In light of recent criticism from US members of Congress, search engine giant Google has pledged that its new privacy policy will still give its users control of data sharing.. In a letter to the California-based technology giant, the Congress members expressed concern over the fact that users wouldn't be able to opt-out of the new data sharing system when using Google products.
The Congressmen observed that consumers should have the option of opting out of data collection when "they are not comfortable with a company's terms of service and that the ability to exercise that choice should be simple and straightforward".
Google, meanwhile, has already stated its determination to make privacy across its products easier and clearer when introducing its new policy.
Writing for the firm's official blog, Google explained that the new privacy policy explains that, if you're signed in, "we may combine information you've provided from one service with information from other services. In short, we'll treat you as a single user across all our products, which will mean a simpler, more intuitive Google experience."
It had been feared that Google would simply use the data to target advertising and search results to users. Indeed, the Congressmen expressed fears that some Google products and services are more hidden, meaning that Internet users might be unconscious as to what data was being linked to them.
One of the signatories to the letter, Congressman Ed Markey, expressed particularly strong fears over how the new policy would impact on young people, pointing out that search through Google is like breathing for "millions of kids and teens".
However, he praised the new policy, saying that it should enable consumers to opt-out if they don't want their use of YouTube to "morph into YouTrack".
Google, for its part, pointed out that it is not necessary to log in to use a lot of its products, including its search engine. And when users are logged in, Google said that they can, if they so choose, take advantage of the privacy control options.

In light of recent criticism from US members of Congress, search engine giant Google has pledged that its new privacy policy will still give its users control of data sharing.. In a letter to the California-based technology giant, the Congress members expressed concern over the fact that users wouldn't be able to opt-out of the new data sharing system when using Google products.

 

The Congressmen observed that consumers should have the option of opting out of data collection when "they are not comfortable with a company's terms of service and that the ability to exercise that choice should be simple and straightforward".

 

Google, meanwhile, has already stated its determination to make privacy across its products easier and clearer when introducing its new policy.

 

Writing for the firm's official blog, Google explained that the new privacy policy explains that, if you're signed in, "we may combine information you've provided from one service with information from other services. In short, we'll treat you as a single user across all our products, which will mean a simpler, more intuitive Google experience."

 

It had been feared that Google would simply use the data to target advertising and search results to users. Indeed, the Congressmen expressed fears that some Google products and services are more hidden, meaning that Internet users might be unconscious as to what data was being linked to them.

 

One of the signatories to the letter, Congressman Ed Markey, expressed particularly strong fears over how the new policy would impact on young people, pointing out that search through Google is like breathing for "millions of kids and teens".

 

However, he praised the new policy, saying that it should enable consumers to opt-out if they don't want their use of YouTube to "morph into YouTrack".

 

Google, for its part, pointed out that it is not necessary to log in to use a lot of its products, including its search engine. And when users are logged in, Google said that they can, if they so choose, take advantage of the privacy control options.