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A batch of beer that brews itself? Water that adjusts its own pH? A completely organic carbon monoxide detector? With bacterial DNA circuitry, such things are now possible.  Bacteria can be programmed to respond to changes in temperature, pH, oxygen level. (via MIT)   After Kosuri et al at Harvard figured out a way to store data within naked DNA in 2012, researchers at MIT have built on that engineering to incorporate such information into biological circuits, programs embedded within ...
Monitoring blood pressure has evolved from expensive, large equipment used only by professionals to something that we can all easily use. Huge advancements thanks to MEMS sensors and microcontrollers now allow for precise readings from much smaller form factors such as a watch, activity monitor or other wearable. Progression of MEMS sensors in the medical field will have increasing sophistication of algorithms that can detect accurate signals from the equipment. More information on h ...
kasba

ECG signal amplication

Posted by kasba May 10, 2014
Good morning. I just received my Raspberry Pi. I am a very very beginner, with some knowledge in programming, trying to learn JAVA but a dummy in electronics. Could someone tell me how to amplify an ECG signal so that it can be "seen" by the GPIO? Between 1 and 5 mV. Thank you very much. ...
lm_anthony

TedCas & Leap Motion

Posted by lm_anthony Apr 29, 2014
TedCas and Leap Motion show the technology which allows getting access to digital information touch less, in an intuitive way that does not imply to leave the sterilize zone and also prevent contact infections. Through the Leap Motion sensor, TedCas has developed this system that tracks the doctor's hands and fingers, and allows him/her controlling the medical software in a touch less way.  ...
here's the video     OrCam is an assistance device for the blind and visually impaired. OrCam can read, recognize faces, identify objects, products and places, locate bus numbers and monitor traffic lights. It does all that with the most intuitive user interface you can imagine. here's more information on the partnership with Freescale and this amazing device (Freescale website) ...
  Freescale i.MX Processor Powers Device That Compensates for Lost Vision   OrCam eyeglass-mounted device for the visually impaired uses processing power from i.MX 6Quad processor. ChallengeCreate a portable solution for the visually impaired that allows them to access activities that most people take for granted but which pose tremendous challenges for them – riding the bus, shopping for groceries, reading the newspaper. SolutionThe OrCam solution employs sophisticated visual c ...
Smart to Future Cites, London, June 11 & 12. Stand 3. Freescale’s Tim Summers, Networking Products Group Manager, EMEA, will be talking about Connected Health on June 11 from 12.15 p.m. Hear all about some real world examples of connected health in action. You can also meet with Freescale’s M2M experts and see the demonstration of CO² Monitoring on our stand. Register for the conference today: http://smarttofuture.com/ ...
Fujitsu, one of Japan’s well-known information and communications technology leaders, has just announced the development of a smartphone and tablet app that will help people monitor their health over time without the need of operating specialized equipment or sitting still for long periods of time. The real-time heart pulse monitors helps users to keep track of their heart rate activity by use of a face imaging technology that utilizes a computer's camera to measure brightness variations i ...
(Left) 3D printing nozzle for living tissue concept (Right) real-world printed tissue samples (via University of Oxford & Science/AAAS)   We have seen 3D printers create many things from dresses and art, to gun models and cars. Now researchers at Oxford University have created a 3D printer that is capable of printing materials with properties of human tissues. Gabriel Villar, the creator of the printer, is a PhD student supervised by Professor Hagan Bayley. His printer creates extremel ...
Layout of a typical epidermal electronic “tattoo” applied to the human skin with all accompanying sensors. (via University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign)   It appears as though stretchable and wearable electronics are beginning to see rapid advancement into the public eye. Professor John Rogers from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign now shows us a new technological application of what he’s coined as “epidermal electronics” devices.   Roger̵ ...
A group of sciences, including lead researchers from EFPL, have developed a tiny, implantable device that can continuously monitor the levels of up to five chemical substances found in the blood simultaneously and transmit the recorded data wirelessly. (via École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne)   Time for some human-aiding medical technology that will get under some people’s skin. A group of scientists from various European education institutions were brought t ...
Cranial Drilling Tool (via Harvard University)   For those of you still ‘on the ropes’ about drilling into your brain (or some else’s for that matter) and are worried about sustaining a pre-frontal lobotomy, your worries are over thanks to some engineers from Harvard University. The engineers, led by graduate student Paul Loschak, designed their portable handheld Cranial Drilling Tool to drill through the skull and retract once it’s through without damaging the soft ...
  MobiSante has revolutionized ultrasound imaging by bringing us a portable, smart phone based device imaging tool. Sailesh Chutani and David M. Zar, co-founders of MobiSante wanted to fulfill the need for an affordable, accessible, and convenient way to to use ultrasound imaging. Currently, the systems are big and expensive making them inaccessible to many people. However, using a smart phone, software, and an ultrasound probe, a safe and easy to use system has been created that may becom ...
  Fear the doctor's needle no more. Injections can be applied without the use of metal penetrating the skin, instead high power jets of the drug can force its way through your skin. The medical industry has had this tech for some time, but due to the limited control over how deep the injected drug is applied, we have yet to see widespread use. MIT has taken the concept to the next logical stage, control how the drug is applied.   George N. Hatsopoulos Professor of Mechanical Engineer ...
(credit: unknown)     Vaccines are an invaluable tool in places where there is little health care like remote communities in Kenya or India. A small requirement to having these vaccines available is that they must be kept from spoiling in a cool environment. To these remote communities with inconsistent power, this simple requirement may be difficult to achieve. As power outages are a common occurrence, Harvey Rubin of the University of Pennsylvania and Alice Conant of Mudd College, h ...