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2014

Every second and fourth Thursday of each month, I teach a class at my local makerspace, theClubhou.se that centers on STEM Education. Youth between the ages of 8 and 17 attend the class and we strive to teach them how to create fun projects that will hopefully inspire them to embark onto larger projects in the future.

 

During our November and December sessions this past year, we decided that we would teach the YoungMakers how to index strands of LED Christmas lights using nothing but an Arduino, a few Relays, and some LEDs as a proof of concept. After some research, we decided that the best route to take would be to use a program called Vixen Lights to simplify the sequencing process as much as possible. This was necessary because we only had a total of about six-hours spread out over 2 months to complete everything.

 

While I have documented the process we took for the curriculum we wrote around this project, I have yet to take the time to document it online. That is the purpose of this posting and by the end of this post I hope you will be able to use Vixen Lights to sequence some LEDs of your own. Below is a list of materials you will need to complete this tutorial, and almost everything can be bought from Newark.com. You can find all of the necessary code, and related files in my GitHub Repository for this project.

 

 

So to kick this off, we need to plug our LEDs into the breadboard. To simplify things, I like to plug the cathode of each LED into the GND rail of the breadboard, and place the anode into the five-position strip that is in line with the GND hole you plugged the cathode into.  This will allow us to use a jumper wire to connect the anode to the PWM pins on the Arduino, and let us only utilize a single GND port on the Arduino as well.

 

IMG_3306.jpg

 

Make sure to space the LEDs far enough apart to ensure that the ping pong balls will have enough room to fit. To get an idea of how much room you will need, six ping pong balls will take up the entire surface area of a standard breadboard. Once you have all of your LEDs in place, push the ping pong balls onto the 5mm LEDs.

 

IMG_3292.jpg

 

With the LEDs now in position, we can move on to wiring everything up. Starting from the left, attach the first LED anode to digital pin 11 on the Arduino. Follow this up by attaching the next LED’s anode to digital pin 10. The third LED attaches to digital pin 9, with the fourth, fifth and sixth attaching to digital pins 6, 5, and 3 respectively.

 

IMG_3294.jpg

 

Once everything is attached, we can move on to importing and adjusting the code for this project to our specific needs. Head over to my Github repository to download all of the files used in this tutorial, or you can copy and paste the code I have listed below.

 

IMG_3295.jpg

 

Base Code (Needs Modifying)

/*
The purpose of this code is to allow the Arduino to use the
Generic serial output of vixen lights to control 5 channels of LEDs.
Author: Matthew Strange
Created: 14 October 2010

*/

// Output
int Chan1 = 5; // green LED, connected to digital pin 5
int Chan2 = 6; // white LED, connected to digital pin 6
int Chan3 = 9; // red LED, connected to digital pin 9
int Chan4 = 10; // green LED, connected to digital pin 10
int Chan5 = 11; // red LED, connected to digital pin 11

int i = 0; // Loop counter
int incomingByte[8]; // array to store the 7 values from the serial port

//setup the pins/ inputs & outputs
void setup()
{
  Serial.begin(9600); // set up Serial at 9600 bps

  pinMode(Chan1, OUTPUT); // sets the pins as output
  pinMode(Chan2, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(Chan3, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(Chan4, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(Chan5, OUTPUT);
}

void loop()
{ // 7 channels are coming in to the Arduino
  if (Serial.available() >= 5) {
  // read the oldest byte in the serial buffer:
  for (int i=0; i<8; i++) {
  // read each byte
  incomingByte[i] = Serial.read();
  }

  analogWrite(Chan1, incomingByte[0]); // Write current values to LED pins
  analogWrite(Chan2, incomingByte[1]); // Write current values to LED pins
  analogWrite(Chan3, incomingByte[2]); // Write current values to LED pins
  analogWrite(Chan4, incomingByte[3]); // Write current values to LED pins
  analogWrite(Chan5, incomingByte[4]); // Write current values to LED pins
  }
}




 

With the code now open in the Arduino IDE, we need to make some adjustments to it to better match our setup.  The first thing we need to do is adjust the output to follow the schematic on how we hooked up our LEDs on the breadboard. Edit the output to match the code below. What we are doing is telling the Arduino that channel 1 on the breadboard equals pin 11 and so on. This is important because Vixen will tell the Arduino later which channel to turn on during the sequence.

 

Adjust Output Pin Definitions

// Output
int Chan1 = 11; // green LED, connected to digital pin 11
int Chan2 = 10; // white LED, connected to digital pin 10
int Chan3 = 9; // red LED, connected to digital pin 9
int Chan4 = 6; // green LED, connected to digital pin 6
int Chan5 = 5; // red LED, connected to digital pin 5
int Chan6 = 3; // red LED, connected to digital pin 3




 

Up next we need to adjust the set up to match the settings of our output. Again make the code in your sketch match the code below. Basically this tells the Arduino that all six channels defined above should be treated as outputs.

 

Adjust Setup Code

void setup()
{
  Serial.begin(9600); // set up Serial at 9600 bps

  pinMode(Chan1, OUTPUT); // sets the pins as output
  pinMode(Chan2, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(Chan3, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(Chan4, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(Chan5, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(Chan6, OUTPUT);
}





Vixen will utilize the serial communication port to tell our Arduino which channels to turn on and which to turn off and as such, we need to adjust the number of channels that are coming into the Arduino from the serial port.  The original code specifies 5 channels, but since we are doing 6 channels, we need to adjust this to match.  As we did before, make your code match the code I have pasted below.

 

Adjust Loop Code Part 1

void loop()
{ // 6 channels are coming in to the Arduino
  if (Serial.available() >= 6) {
  // read the oldest byte in the serial buffer:
  for (int i=0; i<7; i++) {
  // read each byte
  incomingByte[i] = Serial.read();
  }




 

Now we are almost finished. We now need to add once analogWrite line to the last part of our code. Since the original code was written for 5 channels, we just need to add one more channel to the loop. The correct code is pasted below. Match your code to this.

 

Adjust Loop Code Part 2

  analogWrite(Chan1, incomingByte[0]); // Write current values to LED pins
  analogWrite(Chan2, incomingByte[1]); // Write current values to LED pins
  analogWrite(Chan3, incomingByte[2]); // Write current values to LED pins
  analogWrite(Chan4, incomingByte[3]); // Write current values to LED pins
  analogWrite(Chan5, incomingByte[4]); // Write current values to LED pins
  analogWrite(Chan6, incomingByte[5]); // Write current values to LED pins




 

With that complete, your code should now look like this. If you see any mistakes, please go back and correct them before continuing on with this tutorial.

 

Final Code

/*
The purpose of this code is to allow the Arduino to use the
generic serial output of vixen lights to control 5 channels of LEDs.
Author: Matthew Strange
Created: 14 October 2010
Adapted for 6-PWM-Channels by Charles Gantt on November 14th 2013.

*/

// Output
int Chan1 = 11; // green LED, connected to digital pin 11
int Chan2 = 10; // white LED, connected to digital pin 10
int Chan3 = 9; // red LED, connected to digital pin 9
int Chan4 = 6; // green LED, connected to digital pin 6
int Chan5 = 5; // red LED, connected to digital pin 5
int Chan6 = 3; // red LED, connected to digital pin 3

int i = 0; // Loop counter
int incomingByte[8]; // array to store the 7 values from the serial port

//setup the pins/ inputs & outputs
void setup()
{
  Serial.begin(9600); // set up Serial at 9600 bps

  pinMode(Chan1, OUTPUT); // sets the pins as output
  pinMode(Chan2, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(Chan3, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(Chan4, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(Chan5, OUTPUT);
  pinMode(Chan6, OUTPUT);
}

void loop()
{ // 7 channels are coming in to the Arduino
  if (Serial.available() >= 6) {
  // read the oldest byte in the serial buffer:
  for (int i=0; i<7; i++) {
  // read each byte
  incomingByte[i] = Serial.read();
  }

  analogWrite(Chan1, incomingByte[0]); // Write current values to LED pins
  analogWrite(Chan2, incomingByte[1]); // Write current values to LED pins
  analogWrite(Chan3, incomingByte[2]); // Write current values to LED pins
  analogWrite(Chan4, incomingByte[3]); // Write current values to LED pins
  analogWrite(Chan5, incomingByte[4]); // Write current values to LED pins
  analogWrite(Chan6, incomingByte[5]); // Write current values to LED pins
  }
}




 

1.jpg

Once the code is complete, its time to verify and upload the code to your Arduino. You can do this by simply clicking the “Play” button which is second from the left at the top of the Arduino window. If everything uploads correctly and no errors arose, it is time to move onto installing and configuring Vixen. Head over to VixenLights.com and grab the latest version of Vixen Lights 2.

 

2.jpg

 

Installing Vixen is fairly simple as it comes already unpacked into its directory. Make sure to place it somewhere you will remember to find it such as the desktop, or in your documents folder. To begin, launch Vixen and let’s set up a sequence. This is a very important step and very close attention should be paid and every step should be followed exactly for things to work properly. To start, click on the sequence tab and navigate to New Event Sequence > Vixen Standard Sequence.

 

3.jpg

 

Once you click on Vixen Standard Sequence the New Sequence Wizard will pop up and prompt you with a few configurable options. The first major thing you will need to set up is the Event Period. This value determines the period of time that each LED will stay lit. You can adjust this time down to 25-miliseconds and up as high as 1 second. For the purpose of this tutorial, we are going to keep it simple at 100-miliseconds, giving us 10 events per channel, per second.

 

4.jpg

 

Up next is where most of the configuration happens. To make things simple, we are going to create a profile that we can save and re-use in the future.  Click Profile Manager and then click the Add icon that is highlighted in the image above.

 

5.jpg

 

Give the new profile a name and then click OK. At this point the Edit Profile screen will pop up, and you need to add six channels.

 

6.jpg

 

Once the six channels have been added click the Output Plugins button and you will see the Sequence Plugin Mapping configuration window pop up. Under Available Plugins, select Generic Serial, and click the Use button. Set the channels from 1 to 6, and click the Plugin Setup button.

 

7.jpg

 

Set the Com Port to 4 (also make sure your Arduino is set to Com Port 4) and set the Baud Rate to 9600 and then click OK.

 

8.jpg

 

The Profile window will once again pop up, and you will need to select the profile you just created, and then click next. Since we are not adding any audio to this sequence, click next on the Audio and Event Patterns window.

 

9.jpg

 

Finally we are presented with the Sequence Time configuration window. For this tutorial I have set it to 1-minute, but you can set this to any length you desire. Once you have your time set, click the Create It button and you will be prompted to save this sequence. Give it a name, and click Save.

 

16.jpg

 

The PC will take a few moments to process and create your sequence, but when finished, a sequence configuration window will open and the sequence will be represented in a timeline that is sectioned into a grid-like pattern. Each one of these little blocks represents a single event period, and can be used to turn that channel on, off, or set a brightness value.

 

17.jpg

 

To keep things organized and easy to configure we need to assign a color to each channel. To do this we must right click on the channel list, and select Channel Properties.

 

18.jpg19.jpg

 

When you click Channel Properties, a small window will pop up and will have several configurable options. For the purpose of this tutorial, we will just be changing each channels color. Set the first one to red, and then click the channel dropdown and select channel two.

20.jpg


Continue doing this until each channel has a unique color. I color coded the channels in my sequence to reflect the LED colors on my breadboard.

 

21.jpg

 

So let’s begin building the sequence. Click and highlight the event periods you wish to enable, and then click the solid square button in the control bar as seen highlighted in the image above. You can also enable the event periods by pressing the spacebar. Play around with the rest of the buttons on that row for some cool effects. I don’t want to dive too deep into building advanced sequences as that is an entire article on its own, and this tutorial is already long enough.

 

 

Now we can run the sequence. Make sure the Arduino is plugged in and is set to Com Port 4 in the Device Manager. If everything is correct, click the play button located at the top left of the Vixen Sequence. You should see the LEDs begin to light up and follow the sequence you just built. If you get a router / com port error, simply save your sequence, close Vixen and Arduino and reopen Vixen and load your sequence. Things should work now.

 

You can adapt this same setup to trigger relays to control 110v circuits that can activate LED Christmas Lights, Halloween Lighting, or pretty much anything that runs on mains voltage. Below is a video of a 4-christmas tree setup I built with my Makerspace that sequenced 32 channels of LED Christmas Lights.

 

I recently picked up a new hobby that involves custom building muti-rotor helicopters and during this journey I have found a strong desire to map the flights of my quad copter. Unfortunately, a full sized handheld GPS is much too heavy to add to the payload of the quad copter and still retain respectable flight times. So I began searching for a small, lightweight GPS data logging solution that I could build myself with readily available, off the shelf components.

 

After a few days of research I settled on an Arduino and GPS shield combo with a cusom 3D printed case. Around the time I ordered the hardware I would need, a company called TinyCircuits contacted me and asked me if I would be interested in reviewing their products, and writing a few tutorials around their Tinyduino line of micro-development boards. I agreed and a few days later I had the company’s entire Tinyduino line sitting on my workbench.

 

1.jpg

 

Included in this kit was a fully functional micro-GPS shield that was not much larger than a quarter, an SD card shield, and an ArduinoArduino. When stacked together, the entire package is about 1-inch cubed, which makes the stack the perfect size for attaching to RC aircraft.  With everything I needed to develop my GPS logger I sat down at my bench to get the party started. I began researching and looking for sample code to help me speed up the build process, and during that search, I found a GPS data logger project that was built using the same TinyCircuits hardware I had on hand.


2.jpg

 

The GPS data logging project I found on Make.com was designed to track the author’s cat, but the code I needed to get my project off the ground would do the job whether it was tracking a cat or tracking the flight path of my quad copter. I realized that this project would be the perfect opportunity to write an article on how easy it is to build a project using the Arduino development environment and how easy it is to find, adapt and utilize existing code in your projects.

 

The TinyDuino series is pretty cool in the fact that you have a full Arduino Pro / Pro Mini packed onto a board the size of a quarter. I won’t go into great detail about the boards and what makes them so special, but if you would like further information on them, check out the full overview I wrote on TweakTown.com. Below is a list of everything you need to create a simple GPS Data Logger of your own using the Tiny Circuits hardware.

 

TinyCircuits PartsAlternate Arduino Parts From Newark
  • TinyDuino
  • TinyShield microSD
  • TinyShield GPS
  • TinyShield USB & ICP
  • TinyDuino Mounting Kit
  • 3D Printed Case
  • Code
  • Class 4 or higher 4GB microSD Card

Arduino Uno R3Arduino Uno R3

Arduino GPS ShieldArduino GPS Shield

 

 

IMG_3290.jpg

 

There really is not much to building the GPS Data Logger other than stacking the shields in the correct order, uploading the code to the Arduino, and then getting outside and logging some data. The stack should be built in the following order.  The bottom most board should be the TinyDuino, which should then be followed by the TinyShield microSD board. Up next would be the TinyShield GPS which is followed by the TinyShield USB and ICP.

 

IMG_3287.jpg

 

I chose to power my GPS Logger using a 18650 powered USB cellphone charger instead of the CR2023 or JST methods that the TinyDuino also supports. If you chose to go this route, you will need to arrange your stack with the TinyShield USB & ICP board placed between the TinyDuino and TinyShield GPS, I chose this route because I had several spare USB cellphone chargers laying around.

 

IMG_3288.jpg

 

With everything stacked together, let’s prepare the TinyDuino for coding. Plug a microUSB cable into the TinyShield USB & ICP board, then select the appropriate USB port that the TinyDuino is now connected to. Once the correct port has been selected, we need to set the Arduino IDE to recognize the correct Arduino-compatible board. Since we are using a TinyDuino, we need to select Arduino Pro or Pro Mini (3.3V, 8MHz) w/ ATmega328. Once finished we should be ready to import some test code to the TinyDuino to test that everything is working correctly.

 

Before we upload any code we will need to make a minor change to the SoftwareSerial library in the Arduino IDE. You will need to replace the SoftwareSerial.cpp and SoftwareSerial.h Library files with the ones found in the GitHub repo for this tutorial. Replacing the files is quite easy and you simply need to navigate to Arduino>libraries>SoftwareSerial and rename the existing files to SoftwareSerial_cpp.bak and SoftwareSerial_h.bak and then download the new files into this directory.


Now that that is complete, lets upload some test code to make sure that everything was configured correctly and the TinyShield GPS module is sending raw NMEA data to the Tiny Duino. Upload the code that is embedded below (also found in the Git repo titled GPS_Test_Firmware.ino) and then open the serial terminal in Arduino and set the baud rate to 9600. You should see some weird strings that look like the pasted code below the GPS Test Firmware code.

 

GPS_Test_Firmware

/**********************************************************
* TinyCircuits Test Procedure
* Tiny-Circuits.com
*
* This is the test program for the GPS TinyShield (ASD2501)
*
**********************************************************/


#include <SoftwareSerial.h>


static const int GPS_ONOFFPin = A3;
static const int GPS_SYSONPin = A2;
static const int GPS_RXPin = A1;
static const int GPS_TXPin = A0;
static const int GPSBaud = 9600;
static const int chipSelect = 10;


// The GPS connection is attached with a software serial port
SoftwareSerial Gps_serial(GPS_RXPin, GPS_TXPin);


int led = 13;


void setup()
{
  // Init the GPS Module to wake mode
  pinMode(GPS_SYSONPin, INPUT);
  pinMode(GPS_ONOFFPin, OUTPUT);
  digitalWrite( GPS_ONOFFPin, LOW );
  delay(5);
  if( digitalRead( GPS_SYSONPin ) == LOW )
  {
     // Need to wake the module
    digitalWrite( GPS_ONOFFPin, HIGH );
    delay(5);
    digitalWrite( GPS_ONOFFPin, LOW );  
  }

  // Open serial communications and wait for port to open:
  Serial.begin(9600);
  pinMode(led, OUTPUT);
  Gps_serial.begin(9600);
}


void loop()
{
  if (Gps_serial.available())
     Serial.write(Gps_serial.read());
}



RAW GPS NMEA DATA

$PSRF150,1*3E
$GPGGA,,,,,,0,00,,,M,0.0,M,,0000*48
$GPGSA,A,1,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,*1E
$GPGSV,3,1,12,01,0error opening gps.txt
0,000,,02,00,000,,03,00,000,,04,00,000,*7C
$GPGSV,3,2,12,05,00,000,,06,00,000,,07,00,000,,08,00,000error opening gps.txt
,*77
$GPGSV,3,3,12,09,00,000,,10,00,000,,11,00,000,,12,00,000,*71
$GPRMC,,V,,,,,,,,,,N*53
$GPGGA,error opening gps.txt
,,,,,0,00,,,M,0.0,M,,0000*48
$GPGSA,A,1,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,*1E
$GPGSV,3,1,12,01,00,000,,02,00,000,,03,0error opening gps.txt
0,000,,04,00,000,*7C
$GPGSV,3,2,12,05,00,000,,06,00,000,,07,00,000,,08,00,000,*77
$GPGSV,3,3,12,09error opening gps.txt
,00,000,,10,00,000,,11,00,000,,12,00,000,*71
$GPRMC,,V,,,,,,,,,,N*53
$GPGGA,,,,,,0,00,,,M,0.0,M,,0error opening gps.txt
000*48
$GPGSA,A,1,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,*1E
$GPGSV,3,1,12,01,00,000,,02,00,000,,03,00,000,,04,00,000,*7C
error opening gps.txt
$GPGSV,3,2,12,05,00,000,,06,00,000,,07,00,000,,08,00,000,*77
$GPGSV,3,3,12,09,00,000,,10,00,000,,11error opening gps.txt
,00,000,,12,00,000,*71
$GPRMC,,V,,,,,,,,,,N*53
$GPGGA,,,,,,0,00,,,M,0.0,M,,0000*48
$GPGSA,A,1,,,,error opening gps.txt
,,,,,,,,,,,*1E


If the data that appears in the serial terminal does not look like this, then you will need to re-upload the SoftwareSerial files and upload the test code again.

 

Now that everything is working fine, we need to upload the actual GPS Data Logging code to the TinyDuino. I have pasted the code below, and remember to insert a properly formatted microSD (Read how to do this here ) card into the TinyShield microSD.

 

GPS Data Logger Code

/*
   This Arduino sketch will log GPS NMEA data to a SD card every second
   This code was written by Ken Burns, founder and CEO of TinyCircuits
*/


#include <SoftwareSerial.h>
#include <SD.h>




// The Arduino pins used by the GPS module
static const int GPS_ONOFFPin = A3;
static const int GPS_SYSONPin = A2;
static const int GPS_RXPin = A1;
static const int GPS_TXPin = A0;
static const int GPSBaud = 9600;
static const int chipSelect = 10;


// The GPS connection is attached with a software serial port
SoftwareSerial Gps_serial(GPS_RXPin, GPS_TXPin);




void setup()
{
  // Init the GPS Module to wake mode
  pinMode(GPS_SYSONPin, INPUT);
  pinMode(GPS_ONOFFPin, OUTPUT);
  digitalWrite( GPS_ONOFFPin, LOW );
  delay(5);
  if( digitalRead( GPS_SYSONPin ) == LOW )
  {
     // Need to wake the module
    digitalWrite( GPS_ONOFFPin, HIGH );
    delay(5);
    digitalWrite( GPS_ONOFFPin, LOW );  
  }


  // Open the debug serial port at 9600
  Serial.begin(9600);

  // Open the GPS serial port
  Gps_serial.begin(GPSBaud);

  Serial.print("Initializing SD card...");
  // make sure that the default chip select pin is set to
  // output, even if you don't use it:
  pinMode(10, OUTPUT);

  // see if the card is present and can be initialized:
  if (!SD.begin(chipSelect)) {
    Serial.println("Card failed, or not present");
    // don't do anything more:
    return;
  }
  Serial.println("card initialized.");
}




int inByte = 0;         // incoming serial byte
byte pbyGpsBuffer[100];
int byBufferIndex = 0;


void loop()
{
  byte byDataByte;

  if (Gps_serial.available())
  {
     byDataByte = Gps_serial.read();

     Serial.write(byDataByte);
     pbyGpsBuffer[ byBufferIndex++ ] = byDataByte;

     if( byBufferIndex >= 100 )
     {
       byBufferIndex = 0;   
       File dataFile = SD.open("gps.txt", FILE_WRITE);

       // if the file is available, write to it:
       if (dataFile) {
        dataFile.write(pbyGpsBuffer, 100);
        dataFile.close();
      }
      // if the file isn't open, pop up an error:
      else {
        Serial.println("error opening gps.txt");
      }    
     }  
  }
}


 

Once the code is finished uploading, you should see the LED on the TinyDuino blink once every second. This is an indication that the TinyShield GPS is doing its job and polling its location every second and writing that point to the microSD Card. Now is the time to venture out unto the world and capture some data. Do this by unplugging the GPS Data Logger stack from your PC, and powering up the board by a CR2023, JST connected battery, or via the TinyShield USB & ICP like I have done. If you placed the TinyShield USB & ISP board on top of the stack you will need to remove it now to ensure that the GPS antenna gets a stong signal. If you need this board to power your stack, then move it to a position between the TinyDuino and TinyShield GPS.



Unfortunately I have not hand a chance to take my TinyCircuits GPS Data Logger outside and gather data yet as we have had some fairly bad weather over the last few weeks. Every chance I get to venture outside on a sunny and nice day, I get caught up with another article, breaking news, or some other task that eats up my free time.  But for you, this tutorial will continue on and I will explain how to take the data that has been written to the SD card and show you how to import it into Google Earth for viewing.

 

When you are finished recording data, head to your nearest PC and open the SD card to view the filed stored inside. If you correctly formatted the SD card then you should only see one file that is titled gps.txt. Make sure you have extensions visible if using Windows, and then rename the file to gps.nmea. The current SD library can only write extensions up to three characters in length and is why the file is saved as a .txt instead of nmea.


Once you have the file renamed, open Google Earth and navigate to Tools>GPS and click GPS. There will be an option to upload a gps file. You can simply browse to the gps.nmea file you renamed, upload that file and Google Earth will plot the exact path that your GPS Logger took when it was gathering data. There are several other programs that can be used to visualize this data, but I will not list them here as a simple Google Search will give you pages of information on them.

 

26.jpg

 

Now that we have the GPS Data Logger working, we need to secure the stack together using the TinyDuino Mounting Kit. This will ensure that the stack stays securely connected during any impacts that might occur during flight.


IMG_3291.jpg

 

With everything secure, we also need to enclose the stack inside the case so that it is safe from static discharges, moisture, and debris. You can head over to Thingiverse , or Github to download the custom enclosure I designed to house this project. It is designed to be affixed to a quad copter or any other ½” surface using nothing but Velcro straps that are commonly used to bind computer cables together. It could also be secured using zipties as well.


Video Here


GPS-Logger-Image.jpg

 

I will update this post with video and tracking data from the first flight as soon as I get the final few parts in for the quad-copter I am currently building. They should be here within a week, so please check back for updates! Not much of any part of this project is of my own design except for the 3D printed case, and that is completely OK. I wrote this tutorial to demonstrate how easy it is to build almost any project with just a little knowledge, some pre-existing code, and a little creative design skills. I hope you enjoyed this project as much as I did, and I can not wait to update it with video and GPS data from some of my first flights with my new scratch-built quad-copter.