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Arduino

6 Posts authored by: organtin
In one of my last posts I have shown how to drive a servo motor. Servo motors comes in two flavours: the standard servo motors can be set such that they reach a given position and maintain it; the continuous rotation servo can rotate continuously at a given speed.   DC motors are very similar to continuous rotation servo motors, in fact. With respect to the latter, DC motor technology is much simpler and, as a consequence, these motors are cheaper than servos. As suggested by their name, D ...
During the past days I was busy with the preparation of a scientific exhibition that opened on September 25 for the European Research Night. The year 2015 is the International Year of the Light, as declared by the UN, hence the theme of the exhibition is the Light and its scientific applications. We were working on a Newton's disc, when I came to the idea that one can easily build an electronic version of such a device. A Newton's disc is a disc divided in segments, each of which has a differen ...
My last post was about the usage of a digital compass. The topic of that post was on the usage of the compass together with an Arduino to obtain the values of the components of the magnetic field vector measured by the sensor.   The values obtained with the technique illustrated there are, in fact, just a digitalisation of the "real" values. In other words, what you read with Arduino is just an 11-bits binary number whose value is proportional to the magnetic field sensed in each direction ...
This time I'm going to introduce the usage of a kind of magnetic sensors called digital magnetoresistive sensors. Magnetoresistive sensors are based on a property of several materials called magnetoresistance, consisting in the variation of their electrical resistivity when placed in a magnetic field. In practice, the current flow through a magnetoresistive wire depends on the strength and on the orientation of an external magnetic field. The adjective "digital" in the name of these sensors refe ...
In my previous post on the subject I showed how to configure the Arduino Ethernet shield, in such a way you can save a lot of memory. Now it's time to use the shield for something useful. Arduino is mostly used to take data from sensors and to drive actuators to perform actions (such as motors, servos, relays, etc.). In this post we are going to use Arduino to collect some data (e.g. temperatures) and store them on a computer disk for subsequent analysis. As a physics teacher, in fact, I am inte ...
This is the first of a series of posts devoted to the (clever) usage of Arduino, with particular emphasis to scientific tasks. The content of these posts will also be available on my free publications on using Arduino for scientific purposes: Scientific Arduino Programming. With respect to other similar posts, mine will not only show how to do something using Arduino: as a physics teacher I will explain why you are required to do that. In order to use any tool at its best, it is important to und ...

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