Hello everyone, and welcome back to another weekly design challenge summary. It’s the thirteenth week of the Sixth Sense Design Challenge, and the second week of the PiCasso Design Challenge. Lots of progress has been made over the past week, but before we get to the good stuff, let’s take a few moments to learn more about the challenges, their challengers, and what hardware they are using.

 

Sixth Sense Design Challenge

 

About The Challenge

 

Featured as the final Design Challenge of 2018, this challenge task its participants with upgrading an existing robotic device such as a drone, remote control car, or any other remotely operated robot to give it a so-called sixth sense. This could include adding a fire suppression system to an RC helicopter, thermal imaging to a rescue robot, or any other feature that improves on the effectiveness of its host robot. While ten project proposals were chosen to be the official projects of the challenge, entering the challenge is not limited to just those sixteen community members. Anyone can join the Challenge as a non-sponsored Challenger, and still be eligible win one of the three prizes. If you are a non-sponsored challenger all you need to do is integrate the components from the official challenger kit into your design, and post 10-weekly blogs detailing your project’s build.

 

The Official Kit

 

The Sixth Sense Design Challenge is sponsored by STMicroelectronics, and TE Connectivity. Each challenger will receive all of the components below plus a wide assortment of additional passive, and digital components to build their projects with. If you would like to enter the challenge for yourself, or if you just want to follow along at home, you can purchase all of the components in the kit right here at Element14.

 

From STMicroelectronics

From TE Connectivity

To learn more about each of these components as well as the other components included in the kit, visit the official kit announcement page or click the links above to purchase them for your project.

 

The Prizes

      • Grand Prize:Lulzbot Taz 6 3D Printer
      • Runner Up Prize:Lulzbot Mini 2
      • Finisher Prize:  It’s a surprise! To be eligible, a challenger has to complete their project, use products from the challenger kit, and post at least 10 updates in the Sixth Sense Design Challenge space.

 

The Past Week In Review

 

Over the past several days, March 17th - March 23rd, we have had a total of nine update posted for four projects.This week, I will be highlighting three of my favorite updates from this past week, but before I get to that, let's take a look at which projects were updated. 

 

Project: UAV System for Industrial Inspection - by UAV Research & Design Group (uavr&d)

Project: Automatic Weeding Robot - by Cheah Wei Leowl (weiwei2)

Project: GraffitiBot - by Douglas Wong (dougw)

Project: R2B4 (remote Robot, Builders Bot Banishing BOT) - by Rod (14rhb)

 

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

Project: R2B4 - Sixth Sense Design Challenge Blog  #9 - The TE Connectivity Load Cell

 

 

One of the key skills that every engineer needs in order to be successful in their career is the ability to adapt and overcome when an unexpected challenge presents itself. This week 14rhb was faced with not one but three of those unexpected challenges. In his last post we learned that he had damaged the A4988 motor driver, and the STM32F411RE-Nucleo board. Unfortunately, while a new Nucleo board was on its way from Farnell, a replacement for the motor driver would not arrive until after the challenge was over. With this bad news in mind, 14rhb decided to build his own motor driver using a few transistors and a pair of relays but was quickly convinced by community members that purchasing a pair of quality, off-the-shelf motor drivers would be a better solution. “I ordered a pair of TB6600 - a 4A micro-stepping capable unit, more expensive than the A4988 or LM298 but hopefully better in every way,” he wrote.

 

The next challenge that 14rhb faced was with the wheels of his robots chassis. The back wheels were rotating at ¼ the speed of the front wheels due to an unnoticed flaw in its drivetrain. To find out how he overcame this issue, as well as what the third and final issue was, you will have to head over to the full post by clicking on the link above.

 

 

Project: GraffitiBot - Sixth Sense Design Challenge Blog  #14 - Mechanical Design

 

 

After fighting for free time to work on Project GraffitiBot, Douglas finally was able to start designing the mechanical assembly and chassis. An 8-minute video is included in the post that details the design very well, and it's totally worth the watch. “The design of the front end and the chassis turned out to be quite complex, partly because there are limits to what a 3D printer can do and I always try to print without any support structure.” he wrote.

 

I do believe that it might be the most complex robot chassis ever designed by one of our challengers for a design challenge, and it 3D printed so well that it looks like it was made in a factory somewhere. I’ve said this many times in the past and I am going to say it again. If you are a future design challenge contestant and you want to have the best blog you possibly can, then you should study each of Douglas Wong’s projects from over the years, and take note of how well he documents things. Head over to the full post watch the mechanical design video, as well as a video of him assembling the chassis.

 

 

Project: UAV System For Industrial Inspection - Sixth Sense Design Challenge Blog  #6 - Infrared and Thermal sensors

 

https://www.element14.com/community/servlet/JiveServlet/downloadImage/38-31980-688790/pastedImage_10.png

 

Using Infrared imaging to detect cracked pipes in industrial settings was the focus of the sixth update to project UAV System For Industrial Inspection. “During the gas leak due to significant speed of the gas extension, the temperature of the pipe around the crack is rapidly cooling. Compare to the normal temperature, the drop of temperature of the leak hole is according to expanding of the gas. This is because the frequency of the atomic collision of the gas is decreased,” the UAV Research & Design Group wrote. “The required data for this is obtained by recording using a thermal camera and saving the video in .avi format. After recording the video of the gas situation, the video is converted into an image in JPEG by using some simple Matlab codes. Hence we have a wide set of images now which are treated as a data set. Alternatively, images can be captured on the thermal camera and saved.” To read the full post, and learn how they managed to filter out the noise to isolate just the leak, click on the link above.

 

 

PiCasso Design Challenge

 

About The Challenge

 

Featured as the first Design Challenge of 2019, this challenge task its twenty participants with creating their artistic masterpiece using a Raspberry Pi Model 3B+. Challengers can either push their boundaries by using the computing power of Pi as the brains of their artistic work or to improve the aesthetics of their surroundings.

 

While twenty project proposals were chosen to be the official projects of the challenge, entering the challenge is not limited to just those twenty community members. Anyone can join the Challenge as a non-sponsored Challenger, and still be eligible win one of the three prizes. If you are a non-sponsored challenger all you need to do is integrate the components from the official challenger kit into your design, and post 10-weekly blogs detailing your project’s build.

 

 

The Official Kit

 

The PiCasso Design Challenge is sponsored by the Raspberry Pi Foundation. Each challenger will receive all of the components below plus a wide assortment of additional passive, and digital components to build their projects with. If you would like to enter the challenge for yourself, or if you just want to follow along at home, you can purchase all of the components in the kit right here at Element14.

 

 

To learn more about each of these components as well as the other components included in the kit, visit the official kit announcement page or click the links above to purchase them for your project.

 

The Prizes

      • Grand Prize: DJI Mavic 2 Pro Videography Drone
      • Runner Up Prize: Nikon D3500 DSLR & Lens Kit
      • Finisher Prize: Raspberry Pi Arcade Kit. To be eligible, a challenger has to complete their project, use products from the challenger kit, and post at least 10 updates in the Sixth Sense Design Challenge space.

 

To learn more about the prizes, head over to the PiCasso Design Challenge Prize Page.

 

 

The Past Week In Review

 

Over the past several days, March 17th - March 23rd, we have had a total of seventeen updates posted across thirteen projects. This week, I will be highlighting three of my favorite updates from this past week, but before I get to that, let's take a look at which projects were updated. 

 

 

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

Project: AI powered CNC Painting Machine - PiCasso Design Challenge Blog  #1 - Idea

 

 

Given the play on words that is the name of this challenge, it’s only proper that someone builds a robot that is capable of creating a painting from an image taken by a Raspberry Pi camera through the utilization of AI, and that is just what Attila Tőkés plans to do with project Artificial Intelligence powered CNC Painting Machine. The plan is to have a Raspberry Pi camera snap an image of something, then the image would be processed through an algorithm that would translate it into code that would allow the robot to paint that image in the style of a specific famous painter from history. “The output image is sent to a Raspberry Pi controlled CNC painting machine, which will output the image to a piece of paper,” Attila wrote. “I thought to try different approaches, to see which works better: color pen, laser engraving, 3D printing few layers, etc.”

 

I’m quite excited to see this project progress over the coming weeks, and it will be interesting to see how it turns out. Head over to the full post at the link above to find out which CNC platform has been chosen for the project, as well as a break down of the rest of the hardware.

 

 

Project: Kinetic Art Mobile - PiCasso Design Challenge Blog  #2 - The Backbone

 

 

Gene Breniman’s project Kinetic Mobile Art makes the list this week in the second spot with his progress on the moveable joints that will serve as the backbone of his art piece. Utilizing a slip-ring, some blue painters tape, and a small DC brushless fan, he was able to successfully create enough propulsion to overcome the friction of the slip-ring.  “I did a couple of quick tests, using blue painters tape to cobble things together, to see if the fans that I had laying around, could overcome the friction of the slip rings,” he wrote. “So far, even the tiniest fans that I have were quiet sufficient to spin the arms at a fast enough rate.  I went with one of the larger fans, so I should have plenty of airflow to play with.”

 

With the fan theory confirmed, he moved on to designing the first rough draft of the ball that will house a pair of the fans which will be positioned opposite to each other in order to create thrust in either direction. This will allow the art piece to spin in either direction, as well being able to spin each fan at varying rates in order to precisely position the art piece around to a specific location in its orbit. Head over to the link above to read through the entire post.

 

 

Project: Art-a-Tronic - PiCasso Design Challenge Blog  #4 - Rotational Torso

 

 

With so many new posts every week I am trying very hard to highlight everyone’s project, but I had to give our final spot this week to Enrico Miglino because his project’s fourth update was just too good to pass over. As we mentioned in previous coverage of this project, Enrico is building an art exhibit for a larger art exhibit he is hosting. Part of that exhibit is a moveable mannequin, and to make the mannequin move he needed to build a lazy susan bearing for its torso. Unfortunately, Amazon has delayed delivery of the ball bearings he ordered, and Enrico was forced to improvise by hacking a pair of bicycle bearings up with a Dremel tool. “The only problem was finding a way to get fast a considerable number of steel spheres to make the Lazy Susy bearing support; unfortunately the Amazon order of the 3.5 mm diameter 1000 sphere set has been delayed and I can't expect to be delivered before next April, 15,” he wrote. “I thought what is the mechanism that contains this kind of spheres, cheap and easy to disassemble then finally I solved it in a sport mega discount. At the ridiculous price of 7 Euro, I bought two freewheels replacements for bicycles. Not difficult to open it with the Dremel metal cutter and like magic I have found the treasure: some hundred of 3.5 mm diameter steel spheres.”

 

With that problem solved, Enrico was able to continue forward designing the lazy susan and 3D printing it out. A stepper motor, GT2 pulley, and matching timing belt later, and the torso of the Mannequin was able to controlled electronically. As I said previously, I am a big fan of Enrico’s past projects, and this one is shaping up to be just as awesome. You can read Enrico’s full post at the link above.

 

 

That is going to wrap up this weeks coverage of the Sixth Sense Challenge, and the Picasso Design Challenge. If you have not yet done so, please take a moment and check out all of this weeks updates, and show our challengers some love in the comments section of each update post. Check back next week for another weekly design challenge summary.