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Design Challenges

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Welcome to another installment in the Design Challenge Weekly Summary series here at Element14! It’s week three of the IoT On Wheels Challenge, and things are getting off to a great start. Before we jump into the challenge, you should take a moment and read my intro post that will fill you in on the full details of the challenge as well as the challengers who are competing to win some amazing prizes. Additionally, there will be a listing at the bottom of this post with links to my previous coverage of this challenge.

 

IoT On Wheels Design Challenge

 

 

About The Challenge

 

 

Featured as the third design challenge of 2017, the IoT On Wheels Design Challenge opened for project idea submissions in June of 2017, which was met with many submissions from community members. As I mentioned earlier, the challenge is based around the NUCLEO-L476RG development boardNUCLEO-L476RG development board which is built on the STM32L4STM32L4 Arm Cortex M4 line of processors. Challengers have ten weeks to develop their project, and share their progress in a series of weekly update post. By posting a minimum of ten update post, challengers become eligible to win several awesome prizes, and the chance to become one of our prestigious design challenge winners.

 

 

Entering the challenge is not limited to just the ten chosen community members though,  anyone can join the Challenge as a non-sponsored Challenger. Here's how: Simply get the low-cost NUCLEO-L476RGNUCLEO-L476RG and integrate it into your project, as well as post 10 blogs about your design journey in the IoT on Wheels space (tagging your blogs 'IoT on Wheels'). All Challengers must build their projects in accordance with the Challenge's terms and conditions and all projects must include the  NUCLEO-L476RGNUCLEO-L476RG

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

 

On September 4th, 2017 Element14 announced which 10 community members were picked to participate in this challenge, and those 10 challengers received a kit of sponsored components to use in their design which was sponsored by STMicroelectronics. Each kit contains the following items:

 

 

To learn more about each of these components or to purchase them to use in your own project, visit the official kit announcement at the links above.

 

Each challenger is competing to win one of three prize packs that feature prizes ranging from a Segway Mini Pro, to an Oculus Rift VR headset, Bicycle GPS system, GoPro Hero 5, and even a radio controlled hobby truck. Other prizes include tools from Duratool, a bench power supply, and even a high end pair of headphones. All challengers who complete ten blog post and finish their project will also receive a prize pack including a tool kit from Duratool, a heat gun, and digital multi-meter. These prizes are open to all who enter the challenge, despite not being an official challenger, with the requirements being the same: Use a STMicro NUCLEO-L47RG and post ten blog post by the challenge’s deadline on November 13th.

 

 

The Past Week In Review

 

Over the past 7 days, September 24 - September 30, we have had a total of thirteen updates posted across eight projects. With so many updates this week, I am going to highlight three project updates that I felt stood out. Before we get to that, let's take a look at which projects received their first updates!

 

 

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

Project: Smart Drive - First Steps with mbed os - Blog #2

 

 

Making his design challenge summary debut, Sergey Vlasov’s (vlasov01) second update to project, Smart Drive, is our first featured blog post this week. With a secure internet connection being major requirement for his project, Serjey decided to utilize our old friend MQTT as the messenger that would relay data from his sensors to his main node. “My project requires a secure connection with Internet to exchange information. I've selected MQTT protocol as it is open, lightweight (low power consumption), supports data confidentiality (TLS) and widely adopted (including client for STM32,” he said. The frequency in which we see projects that use MQTT in design challenges is a true testament to how powerful and easy to use this almost two decade old protocol is. Head over to the link above to check out the full blog post.

 

 

Project Walking-Wheel on Water#4 Coding on Nucleo-STM32L476 with MEMS board  X-NUCLEO-IKS01A2X-NUCLEO-IKS01A2

 

 

F. Yao’s (fyaocn) project, Walking-Wheel on Water saw the most activity this week with a total of five updates. We are going to focus on update number four in which he walks us through his process to interface the X-NUCLEO-IKS01A2X-NUCLEO-IKS01A2 extension board with the nucleo-STM32L476 development boardnucleo-STM32L476 development board. “The  X-NUCLEO-IKS01A2X-NUCLEO-IKS01A2 is a motion MEMS and environmental sensor expansion board for the STM32 Nucleo It is equipped with Arduino UNO R3Arduino UNO R3 connector layout and is designed around the LSM6DSL 3D accelerometerLSM6DSL 3D accelerometer and 3D gyroscope the LSM303AGR 3D accelerometer and 3D magnetometer the  HTS221HTS221 humidity and temperature sensor and the LPS22HB pressure sensor The  X-NUCLEO-IKS01A2X-NUCLEO-IKS01A2 interfaces with the STM32 microcontroller via the I²C pin I the sheme there are two I2C ports I2C1 and I2C2 While the I2C1 and I2C2 share same I/O pins so the I2C1 and I2C2 are same he said. Visit the link above for the full rundown including the source code that was used.

 

 

Project: Traffic Predictor #4 - Finally, the kit arrives

 

 

Our final highlight this week comes from project Traffic Predictor and Auto Pilot by Dixon Selvan (dixon415). This update is a quick, and simple post that demos the ST NUCLEO-L476RGST NUCLEO-L476RG kit. Check out the full post for source code, and a demo video of the board running a blink led program. Dixon also published another update this week that precedes the aforementioned post. Head to this link to check it out.

 

 

That is going to wrap up things for this week, tune in next week for another Design Challenge Summary. If you would like to learn more about this challenge, and to see what progress has already been made, head over to the its official challenge page, and as always, remember to hack the world and make awesome!

 

Weekly Summaries About This Challenge

  1. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: Intro to the IoT On Wheels ChallengeDesign Challenge Weekly Summary: Intro to the IoT On Wheels Challenge
  2. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: September 6 - September 16, 2017
  3. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: September 17 - September 23, 2017
  4. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: September 24 - September 30, 2017
  5. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: October 1 - October 7, 2017
  6. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: October 8 - October 14, 2017
  7. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: October 15 - October 21, 2017
  8. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: October 22 - October 28, 2017
  9. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: October 29 - November 4, 2017
  10. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: November 10 - November 17, 2017
  11. Design Challenge Summary : IoT On Wheels Challenge

Welcome to another installment in the Design Challenge Weekly Summary series here at Element14! It’s week two of the IoT On Wheels Challenge, and things are getting off to a great start. Before we jump into the challenge, you should take a moment and read my intro post that will fill you in on the full details of the challenge as well as the challengers who are competing to win some amazing prizes. Additionally, there will be a listing at the bottom of this post with links to my previous coverage of this challenge.

 

If you are new to the Design Challenge series here at Element14, or my weekly summary series in general, I would like to take a moment to explain what these post are all about. Each week, usually on Monday, I release a new design challenge weekly summary post. I create these post to help those following the challenges better understand what happened within the challenge over the past week. I post a list of each project that got updated, and then highlight between two and three project updates from that week that I felt deserved recognition. This will be my 9th Design Challenge, and as you will see, I truly enjoy watching the challengers and their projects grow over the course of the challenge.

 

I sometimes get asked about my involvement in the judging process, and other than sometimes writing the winners announcements, I have no involvement in the selection, debating, or judging, processes. Early on, I was asked to advise on the Sudden Impact Design Challenge, but I was not writing weekly content for the challenges back then. Furthermore, my opinions have no bearings on the outcome of any of the judging process. Additionally, I wanted to touch on one more topic. I get asked a lot about how projects get featured in this series, and my answer is quite simple. Create a well written, information rich, and visually pleasing project update. Include source code, schematics, design files, and tutorials in your updates. It’s that simple. So, enough with the formalities, let's get on to why you are really here!

 

IoT On Wheels Design Challenge

 

 

About The Challenge

 

 

Featured as the third design challenge of 2017, the IoT On Wheels Design Challenge opened for project idea submissions in June of 2017, which was met with many submissions from community members. As I mentioned earlier, the challenge is based around the NUCLEO-L476RG development boardNUCLEO-L476RG development board which is built on the STM32L4STM32L4 Arm Cortex M4 line of processors. Challengers have ten weeks to develop their project, and share their progress in a series of weekly update post. By posting a minimum of ten update post, challengers become eligible to win several awesome prizes, and the chance to become one of our prestigious design challenge winners.

 

 

Entering the challenge is not limited to just the ten chosen community members though,  anyone can join the Challenge as a non-sponsored Challenger. Here's how: Simply get the low-cost NUCLEO-L476RGNUCLEO-L476RG and integrate it into your project, as well as post 10 blogs about your design journey in the IoT on Wheels space (tagging your blogs 'IoT on Wheels'). All Challengers must build their projects in accordance with the Challenge's terms and conditions and all projects must include the  NUCLEO-L476RGNUCLEO-L476RG

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

 

On September 4th, 2017 Element14 announced which 10 community members were picked to participate in this challenge, and those 10 challengers received a kit of sponsored components to use in their design which was sponsored by STMicroelectronics. Each kit contains the following items:

 

 

To learn more about each of these components or to purchase them to use in your own project, visit the official kit announcement at the links above.

 

Each challenger is competing to win one of three prize packs that feature prizes ranging from a Segway Mini Pro, to an Oculus Rift VR headset, Bicycle GPS system, GoPro Hero 5, and even a radio controlled hobby truck. Other prizes include tools from Duratool, a bench power supply, and even a high end pair of headphones. All challengers who complete ten blog post and finish their project will also receive a prize pack including a tool kit from Duratool, a heat gun, and digital multi-meter. These prizes are open to all who enter the challenge, despite not being an official challenger, with the requirements being the same: Use a STMicro NUCLEO-L47RG and post ten blog post by the challenge’s deadline on November 13th.

 

 

The Past Week In Review

 

Over the past 7 days, September 17 - September 23, we have had a total of seven updates posted across six projects. With so many updates this week, I am going to highlight three project updates that I felt stood out. Before we get to that, let's take a look at which projects received their first updates!

 

 

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

 

Project: Smart Road - Pack Arrives and the fun begins

 

 

In his project’s second post, Grant Colgan (brains93) sits down to and talks about his ideas for this project, and unboxes the official challenger kit.  “My plan is to make the roads safer for all users by giving them more information about the road ahead of them so that they can adjust accordingly…” he said. If you would like the full rundown, head over to the link above for a fifteen-minute video where Grant breaks the project and kit down.

 

 

Project: The Konker Connection - Blog 1

 

 

I was quite excited when I saw that Douglas Wong (dougw) was chosen as a participant in this challenge as his projects never seem to disappoint. I became even more excited when I realized that his project centered around providing current road condition data to his motorcycle using sensor nodes placed along the roadway, with a receiver on the motorcycle. In his project’s first update post, Doug fills us in on his plans to accomplish this, as well as breaking down the modules he will be using to build the sensor nodes and receiver. Check out the full post, and video at the link above.

 

 

Project: CycleOps Blog #2 - Locking Mechanism and More Design Overview

 

 

Parker Ellwanger (rpbruiser) is back for his second weekly highlight of project CycleOps, and this week he became the first challenger to post actual physical progress on his project. With one of the main parts of his project being a smart lock that secures the bicycle’s wheels to its frame, this was the first concept he began working on by designing and 3D printing a prototype of the locking mechanism. If you have read my past summaries, you know that including a 3D printer in your project’s build is the fastest way to catch my attention, and this weeks update did just that. Head over to the link above to find out how Parker designed this neat looking lock concept.

 

 

That is going to wrap up things for this week, tune in next week for another Design Challenge Summary. If you would like to learn more about this challenge, and to see what progress has already been made, head over to the its official challenge page, and as always, remember to hack the world and make awesome!

 

Weekly Summaries About This Challenge

  1. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: Intro to the IoT On Wheels ChallengeDesign Challenge Weekly Summary: Intro to the IoT On Wheels Challenge
  2. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: September 6 - September 16, 2017
  3. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: September 17 - September 23, 2017
  4. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: September 24 - September 30, 2017
  5. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: October 1 - October 7, 2017
  6. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: October 8 - October 14, 2017
  7. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: October 15 - October 21, 2017
  8. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: October 22 - October 28, 2017
  9. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: October 29 - November 4, 2017
  10. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: November 10 - November 17, 2017
  11. Design Challenge Summary : IoT On Wheels Challenge

Welcome to another installment in the Design Challenge Weekly Summary series here at Element14! It’s week one of the IoT On Wheels Challenge, and things are getting off to a great start. Before we jump into the challenge, you should take a moment and read my intro post that will fill you in on the full details of the challenge as well as the challengers who are competing to win some amazing prizes.

 

 

If you are new to the Design Challenge series here at Element14, or my weekly summary series in general, I would like to take a moment to explain what these post are all about. Each week, usually on Monday, I release a new design challenge weekly summary post. I create these post to help those following the challenges better understand what happened within the challenge over the past week. I post a list of each project that got updated, and then highlight between two and three project updates from that week that I felt deserved recognition. This will be my 9th Design Challenge, and as you will see, I truly enjoy watching the challengers and their projects grow over the course of the challenge.

 

 

I sometimes get asked about my involvement in the judging process, and other than sometimes writing the winners announcements, I have no involvement in the selection, debating, or judging, processes. Early on, I was asked to advise on the Sudden Impact Design Challenge, but I was not writing weekly content for the challenges back then. Furthermore, my opinions have no bearings on the outcome of any of the judging process. Additionally, I wanted to touch on one more topic. I get asked a lot about how projects get featured in this series, and my answer is quite simple. Create a well written, information rich, and visually pleasing project update. Include source code, schematics, design files, and tutorials in your updates. It’s that simple. So, enough with the formalities, let's get on to why you are really here!

 

 

IoT On Wheels Design Challenge

 

 

About The Challenge

 

 

Featured as the third design challenge of 2017, the IoT On Wheels Design Challenge opened for project idea submissions in June of 2017, which was met with many submissions from community members. As I mentioned earlier, the challenge is based around the NUCLEO-L476RG development boardNUCLEO-L476RG development board which is built on the STM32L4STM32L4 Arm Cortex M4 line of processors. Challengers have ten weeks to develop their project, and share their progress in a series of weekly update post. By posting a minimum of ten update post, challengers become eligible to win several awesome prizes, and the chance to become one of our prestigious design challenge winners.

 

 

Entering the challenge is not limited to just the ten chosen community members though,  anyone can join the Challenge as a non-sponsored Challenger. Here's how: Simply get the low-cost NUCLEO-L476RGNUCLEO-L476RG and integrate it into your project, as well as post 10 blogs about your design journey in the IoT on Wheels space (tagging your blogs 'IoT on Wheels'). All Challengers must build their projects in accordance with the Challenge's terms and conditions and all projects must include the  NUCLEO-L476RGNUCLEO-L476RG

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

 

On September 4th, 2017 Element14 announced which 10 community members were picked to participate in this challenge, and those 10 challengers received a kit of sponsored components to use in their design which was sponsored by STMicroelectronics. Each kit contains the following items:

 

 

To learn more about each of these components or to purchase them to use in your own project, visit the official kit announcement at the links above.

 

Each challenger is competing to win one of three prize packs that feature prizes ranging from a Segway Mini Pro, to an Oculus Rift VR headset, Bicycle GPS system, GoPro Hero 5, and even a radio controlled hobby truck. Other prizes include tools from Duratool, a bench power supply, and even a high end pair of headphones. All challengers who complete ten blog post and finish their project will also receive a prize pack including a tool kit from Duratool, a heat gun, and digital multi-meter. These prizes are open to all who enter the challenge, despite not being an official challenger, with the requirements being the same: Use a STMicro NUCLEO-L47RG and post ten blog post by the challenge’s deadline on November 13th.

 

 

The Past Week In Review

 

Over the past 10 days, September 6 - September 16, we have had a total of four updates posted across three projects. Since this is the first “week” of the challenge, I am going to kick off my coverage of it by highlighting all three projects. Before we get to that, let's take a look at which projects received their first updates!

 

 

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

 

Project: Walking-Wheel on Water  #2 - Hardware Parts Nucleo-L476 and IDB04A1-BlueNRG

 

 

In his project’s second update, F. Yao (fyaocn) introduced us to some of the hardware he would be using to build his water takeoff and landing capable glider plane. He plans on using ARM MBed to program the STM32-L476 but mentions that it would be a better option if it was a fully open source solution. He went on to talk about implementing Bluetooth into the project as well. Head over to the link above for the full rundown.

 

 

Project: Fatigue Alert System - Blog #1

 

 

Dale Winhold (dwinhold) kicked off project Fatigue Alert System by giving us a little context on what inspired him to join this challenge. He suffers from a severe sleep disorder that could cause him to fall asleep at the wheel while driving, this situation is exasperated by compounding fatigue factors. Fatigued driving is a major issue worldwide, and Dale wants to create an alert system that will notify drivers that it is not safe for them to drive. His first project blog details how he will monitor driver fatigue, and what his plans are for alerting the driver. Head over to the link above to read his full plan.

 

 

Project: CycleOps Blog #1 - Design Overview

 

 

 

 

 

Inspired to build a device that makes bicycle security safer, smarter, and more technologically advanced, Parker Ellwanger (rpbruiser) introduced us to project CycleOps this week. The concept behind this project is that most bicycle security systems are of the dumb variety, and with the current state of microelectronics and the Internet of Things, there is no reason not to have a fully featured electronic security system for bicycles. He has some pretty good ideas, and will be using a pretty cool framework to power the app that will tie this project together. To find out what that framework is, head over to the link above.

 

 

That is going to wrap up things for this week, tune in next week for another Design Challenge Summary. If you would like to learn more about this challenge, and to see what progress has already been made, head over to the its official challenge page, and as always, remember to hack the world and make awesome!

 

 

Weekly Summaries About This Challenge

  1. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: Intro to the IoT On Wheels ChallengeDesign Challenge Weekly Summary: Intro to the IoT On Wheels Challenge
  2. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: September 6 - September 16, 2017
  3. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: September 17 - September 23, 2017
  4. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: September 24 - September 30, 2017
  5. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: October 1 - October 7, 2017
  6. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: October 8 - October 14, 2017
  7. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: October 15 - October 21, 2017
  8. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: October 22 - October 28, 2017
  9. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: October 29 - November 4, 2017
  10. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: November 10 - November 17, 2017
  11. Design Challenge Summary : IoT On Wheels Challenge

 

After a brief hiatus another design challenge is upon us here at Element14, and that means that my weekly summaries are returning as well. Before we get started with week one, I want to take a moment and fill you in on the details of this new challenge. Dubbed IoT On Wheels, this design challenge is centered around the NUCLEO-L476RGNUCLEO-L476RG development board from STMicroelectronics, and task its challengers to utilize the Internet of Things to make their car, bicycle, or other wheeled transportation smarter, safer, and easier to use. If the previous two design challenges from 2017 are any indication, we are in for a real treat over the next few months, so let’s dive a little deeper in and learn more about this challenge, and its challengers.

 

IoT On Wheels Design Challenge

 

About The Challenge

 

Featured as the third design challenge of 2017, the IoT On Wheels Design Challenge opened for project idea submissions in June of 2017, which was met with many submissions from community members. As I mentioned earlier, the challenge is based around the NUCLEO-L476RG development boardNUCLEO-L476RG development board which is built on the STM32L4STM32L4 Arm Cortex M4 line of processors. Challengers have ten weeks to develop their project, and share their progress in a series of weekly update post. By posting a minimum of ten update post, challengers become eligible to win several awesome prizes, and the chance to become one of our prestigious design challenge winners.

 

 

Entering the challenge is not limited to just the ten chosen community members though,  anyone can join the Challenge as a non-sponsored Challenger. Here's how: Simply get the low-cost NUCLEO-L476RGNUCLEO-L476RG and integrate it into your project, as well as post 10 blogs about your design journey in the IoT on Wheels space (tagging your blogs 'IoT on Wheels'). All Challengers must build their projects in accordance with the Challenge's terms and conditions and all projects must include the  NUCLEO-L476RGNUCLEO-L476RG

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

 

On September 4th, 2017 Element14 announced which 10 community members were picked to participate in this challenge, and those 10 challengers received a kit of sponsored components to use in their design which was sponsored by STMicroelectronics. Each kit contains the following items:

 

 

To learn more about each of these components or to purchase them to use in your own project, visit the official kit announcement at the links above.

 

Each challenger is competing to win one of three prize packs that feature prizes ranging from a Segway Mini Pro, to an Oculus Rift VR headset, Bicycle GPS system, GoPro Hero 5, and even a radio controlled hobby truck. Other prizes include tools from Duratool, a bench power supply, and even a high end pair of headphones. All challengers who complete ten blog post and finish their project will also receive a prize pack including a tool kit from Duratool, a heat gun, and digital multi-meter. These prizes are open to all who enter the challenge, despite not being an official challenger, with the requirements being the same: Use a STMicro NUCLEO-L47RG and post ten blog post by the challenge’s deadline on November 13th.

 

The Judges

 

Judging for the IoT On Wheels Design Challenge will be performed by two representatives from STMicroelectronics: Martin Hubik and Vladimir Janousek (), along side the well respected Dr. Radmehr Monfared of Longborough University, and Rachel Peterson from the Element14 community. .

 

For any general questions about the challenge, judging or anything else, you can post a 'comment' on the About This Challenge page (https://www.element14.com/community/docs/DOC-87015/l/iot-on-wheels-design-challenge-about-this-challenge?ICID=iotwheels-thejudges-doclink). Your fellow Challengers or anyone following the challenge are likely to respond.

 

The Challengers and Their Projects

 

I have listed out each project with a link to its respective challenger’s profile page. Below each project is a brief description of the project in its creator's own words. I will update this info once project names have been set in stone, and their blog pages created.

 

Project: Smart Bike Smart Rider (SbSr) by Gurinder Singh Gill (gsgill112)

Gurinder endeavors to build a smart bike that will detect pot holes advise on weather conditions and grade a cyclists ride based on gradients of hills Safety is another key feature that will get an overhaul with the  X-NUCLEO-IKS01A2X-NUCLEO-IKS01A2 Board

 

Project: Smart drive by Sergey Vlasov (vlasov01)

“I'd like to build a collaborative system, that will connect different participants on the wheels. They will be able to share data collected during their travels, Especially valuable will be data related to events like emergency breaking, collisions, crashes, this data will be linked to the position, speed and other information collected from the sensors."

 

Project: The Konker Connection by Douglas Wong (dougw)

"My Konker motorcycle is a great little machine for exploring the backwoods, overgrown trails, seldom used pathways, dirt trails and back roads. It is street legal but it is designed and built to go off-road. I also use it for commuting to work as it gets great gas mileage. It has only rudimentary instrumentation - in keeping with its rugged purpose, but I would like to outfit it with some useful extra features and this design challenge is a perfect excuse to take a run at implementing them."

 

Project: Avoid the Bump by Abhijit Nathwani (abhijitnathwani)

"The idea is to create a system which tracks the potholes as the vehicles navigate through the city and locate their geographic location so that it is easy for the authorities to fix them. Through the system, I plan to remove one major hurdle/excuse for the authorities claiming they do not know the location of the damaged roads and potholes."

 

Project: Vehicle Temperature Alert System (VeTAS) by Shantimohan Elchuri (shantimohan)

"Now a days we have been hearing about death of children being left inside hot cars. None of the vehicles driven today, old or new, have any way of intimating the drivers that either the car interior is getting hot, left a kid in the car or both. Hence this VeTAS project will enable the drivers to get notification when things are going wrong. "

 

Project: Traffic Predictor and Auto Pilot by Dixon Selvan (dixon415)

"It is everyone who will be annoyed to end up on a busy street with never ending traffic. This made me come up with an idea to machine learn and collect information through the mass storage capability of STM32 Nucleo-64 development board. Using the information collected, we can predict the routes the user use and the traffic he/she will face. We can suggest him/her with the alternative route or time which will save him/her from the traffic."

 

Project: Smart Road by Grant Colgan (brains93)

"I had though, why make a vehicle smarter when you could in theory make all vehicles smarter by making the roads smarter. Using a fabric (or some other means of integrating with the tarmac) you could have smart patches throughout a road with various sensors for measuring temperature, humidity, wind speed and average speed of traffic, the smart road could then broadcast status messages to a console in a car warning of Ice, high winds or even if the traffic is slowing rapidly. This could be made available via a custom made device to pick up the signals or using an app for the consoles which are in built in most cars."

 

Project: Fatigue Alert System by Dale Winhold (dwinhold)

"I have a sleep disorder and this ups the possibility of falling asleep while driving. Fatigue is a factor in up to 21 per cent of motor vehicle collisions, resulting in about 400 deaths and 2,100 serious injuries every year. At 21 per cent, fatigue would rank as the third highest cause of collisions behind impaired driving and speed. This is an issue that needs to be addressed."

 

Project: Walking Wheels on Water by F. Yao (fyaocn)

"Make the wheel walking on the water is to make one plane on floating barrel and passive wheels. The plane can not fly on air, but can float on water and move on road. Driven by propellers."

 

Project: Cycle-Ops Security by Parker Ellwanger (rpbruiser)

"Most people who ride a bicycle on  a regular basis are aware that it is of up most importance to secure your bike, as it is a significant investment, and you would not want it to be gone by the time you get done at work or in the grocery store. Many people are also aware that it isn't as easy to have GPS or use one's phone for navigation on bike as it is in a car or motorcycle. This project interest me as I have seen many bicycles on my college campus stolen and is one of the reasons I have hesitated in bringing one myself. If I can increase security and safety through making a smart bicycle I feel as though it would make it easier for more people to use the bicycle as a mode of transportation."

 

As I mentioned earlier, you do not have to be one of the ten chosen challengers to participate in this challenge and still be able to win a prize. Element14 encourage’ anyone who wishes to participate in this challenge to do so. Simply include a STMicroelectronics NUCLEO-L476RGNUCLEO-L476RG in your project, and then post ten project update blogs across ten weeks.

 

That is going to wrap up things for today, I am a little behind due to power outages and other issues from Hurricane Irma, but I plan on getting out week 1’s update later today. Then you can check back each and every week for the duration of this challenge for a summary post from the previous week’s updates. If you would like to learn more about this challenge, and to see what progress has already been made, head over to the its official challenge page, and as always, remember to hack the world and make awesome!

Weekly Summaries About This Challenge

  1. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: Intro to the IoT On Wheels ChallengeDesign Challenge Weekly Summary: Intro to the IoT On Wheels Challenge
  2. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: September 6 - September 16, 2017
  3. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: September 17 - September 23, 2017
  4. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: September 24 - September 30, 2017
  5. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: October 1 - October 7, 2017
  6. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: October 8 - October 14, 2017
  7. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: October 15 - October 21, 2017
  8. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: October 22 - October 28, 2017
  9. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: October 29 - November 4, 2017
  10. Design Challenge Weekly Summary: November 10 - November 17, 2017
  11. Design Challenge Summary : IoT On Wheels Challenge




Welcome to installment number thirty-one of the Design Challenge Project Summary series here at Element14. For those of you who are new to my content, in this series I chose  a single Design Challenge project from current or past challenges, and write a short summary of the project to date. I am selective about which projects I summarize, as I want to highlight quality content. Unfortunately, projects that stall out, or get abandoned, are not chosen for summaries. Some project creators like to keep their own project summary going, and this series is not meant to overshadow those post, but to highlight each project from an outsider's perspective.

 

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The subject of this installment is project Safety Jacket for the Tolling Industry which was part of the Safe & Sound Design Challenge, by Inderpreet Singh (ipv1). The project began the 20th of February 2017 with Inderpreet giving us a little context, and explanation of why he wants to, and how he plans to improve the safety of tolling station workers. As a former R&D engineer at a tolling company, he was Inspired by a traumatic accident that occurred within the company when a toll booth worker was struck and killed by a car. Inderpreet feels that this incident could have been avoided with better communication between the workers, and to solve the issue, he will build a sensor-rich safety jacket that is connected to the IoT, making communication between workers much faster.

 

 

While waiting on the hardware kit to arrive, Inderpreet took some time to re-familiarize himself with the Launchpad ecosystem, and wrote a quick tutorial on how to interface the MSP430G2553MSP430G2553 with the CC110L BoosterpackCC110L Boosterpack. A week later with the package from Element14 still in transit, he used his third project update to discuss the use of TI RTOS with Code Composer Studio 7 as well as on pThreads for the readers who are familiar with POSIX. The challenger kit finally arrived a few days later, and Inderpreet used his fourth project update to share the unboxing festivities with everyone.

 

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In update five and six, Inderpreet took his time to teach us the basics about writing our own protocol stacks for the MSP432MSP432 and TI RTOS. Tutorials like these are one of the major reasons I love the Design Challenge Series here at Element14. They provide a wealth of knowledge, and help simplify often heavy subjects into something non-engineers can understand too. If you are interested in learning how to write you own protocols, this is definitely a pair of post to check out.

 

 

Update seven marked out first look at Cloud CCS since the project started, and instead of writing a few thousand words, Inderpreet decided to explain Code Composer Studio and the TI Resource Explorer by making a video which can be seen above. He then ended the post by mentioning a few issues he is having which are slowing down progress including: issues with MQTT, an unwritten BLE app, and power issued that need to be resolved by integrating a super capacitor.

 

 

Updates eight and nine were both short, and spanned about three days between the two. In update eight, we got to see some of Inderpreet’s experiments on energy harvesting using the BQ25504 and BQ25570 modules. Update nine focused on a 3D printable enclosure for the CC1310 Launchpad. If you are interested in printing this case for yourself, check out the post for a download link.

 

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With the final week of the challenge now here, Inderpreet used the project’s tenth update to write a long and informative post summarizing what he had completed on the project so far. The first topic he touched on was how the project had evolved overtime, and quickly moved into explaining the project’s first working module. This module featured most of the sensors, and the communications core that would relay data back to a central unit. Ending the post with a update on what is left to be done, as well as some photos of the 3D Printed enclosures, Inderpreet was happy with the progress he had made so far.

 

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Update eleven arrived three days later on July 9, 2017, and more work was done on the energy harvesting portion of the project. After some testing, Inderpreet determined that a small solar panel could be used to charge a super-capacitor which would in turn power the small Sharp LCD screen he mentioned in a previous post. More work on this topic continued into update twelve, with wireless charging being the main focus. Using the TI Fuel Tank booster PackTI Fuel Tank booster Pack, and the Qi Wireless Charging KitQi Wireless Charging Kit, two significant parts of the project were completed and checked off of the list of things to do.

 

 

Inderpreet wrapped things up in the project’s thirteenth update, with a full demonstration of the safety jacket in its current state. Again he felt that while the project needed a written demo, a video would be much better medium to explain how it works. With that said, I am going to let you watch the video above, and when you are finished, head over to the project’s fourteenth and final update for a full rundown of the project in Inderpreet’s own words.

 

That is going to wrap up my project summary coverage of project Safety Jacket for the Tolling Industry.This project ultimately went on to receive an honorable mention from the challenge’s judges, and I felt that this was well deserved. While the project got off to a slow start, Inderpreet made up for it with several tutorials and pieces of semi-related content to fill the gaps. I learned a good bit about the Launchpad ecosystem from this project, as well as some programming knowledge as well. If you have not yet read through the whole project, I highly suggest doing so by visiting its blog page. Tune in later this week for another Design Challenge Project Summary here at Element14. Until then, Hack The World, and Make Awesome!  

Welcome to installment number thirty of the Design Challenge Project Summary series here at Element14. For those of you who are new to my content, in this series I chose  a single Design Challenge project from current or past challenges, and write a short summary of the project to date. I am selective about which projects I summarize, as I want to highlight quality content. Unfortunately, projects that stall out, or get abandoned, are not chosen for summaries. Some project creators like to keep their own project summary going, and this series is not meant to overshadow those post, but to highlight each project from an outsider's perspective.

 

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The subject of this installment is project Invisible Hazardous Environmental Factors Monitoring System which was part of the Safe & Sound Design Challenge. Conceived and built by Douglas Wong (dougw), project Invisible Hazardous Environmental Factors Monitoring System was the grand prize winner of this challenge, and quite frankly, it is one of the best projects I have seen in all of the design challenges I have covered over the last four years. Since this project contained more than twenty updates, I will be skipping some of the shorter updates in this summary.

 

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In the project’s first post Douglas pointed out several invisible, yet potentially dangerous, man made and naturally occurring environmental hazards that could create heath and safety issues for humans living, working, or recreating near them. The list included things like the side effects of RF radiation, radon gas exposure, exposure to UV light, as well as several other scenarios. To help better understand if any of these conditions could be cause for health and safety concerns Doug decided to build system of wearable sensors that would allow researchers to collect data that will be vital to understanding what risk there might be when in these conditions.

 

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In update two, Douglas laid out his plan to build the ultimate wearable, environmental data gathering, system of sensors which would feature several components from Texas Instruments including: the EXP432P401REXP432P401R development board as the main board, 430BOOST-SENSE1430BOOST-SENSE1, LCD Booster PackLCD Booster Pack, Sensor Booster PackSensor Booster Pack, and CC3100MODBOOSTCC3100MODBOOST WiFi Booster Pack, as well as several supporting sensors from other manufacturers. With the hardware list complete, he then went on to explain that his vision is to build several modules that can be mounted to a user's arms and clothing, each featuring an LCD screen, with the overall look being something that is aesthetically pleasing, and comfortable for the end user. Of course the functionality has to be there as well, and this is why Doug also plans on pushing the data to a networked device via the WiFi Booster Pack, which will allow the data to be analyzed later from the comfort of one's office.

 

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With the concept committed and the outline for success written, it was time for Douglas to begin the process of bringing this monitoring system to life. To do this, he began by talking about what UV radiation is, how it is harmful to humans, and how he plans on measuring it. Since UVA and UVB wavelengths fall between 280 and 400 nm, the ML8511 photodiode was chosen to serve as the projects UV radiation sensor. This did however create a small issue that Douglas was quick to solve. The issue was that while the sensor was designed to measure these wavelengths, it was not designed to be sensitive at the levels of UVA and UVB that reach the Earth from the sun. To rectify this problem he decided to use a general purpose offset and gain adjustment circuit to amplify the signal so that it can be read by the analog channels on the MSP_EXP432P401RMSP_EXP432P401R.

 

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Update four was dedicated to Air Quality, and all of the common everyday items that can off gas potentially harmful gasses into the air we breathe. Things like air fresheners, dryer sheets, mattresses, and many other things release gasses that in large enough quantities, could cause health issues in humans and pets. While many of these gasses are easy to identify by their noxious smells, some are odorless, and require detection through other means. Three MQ style gas sensors will be used to detect these so-called “odorless” gasses, with these sensors mating to a custom booster pack that Douglas will design and have manufactured. This was quite a long and informative post, so I highly suggest you read through it to get a better grasps on how each of the three gas sensors will be utilized.

 

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With the arrival of week five, Douglas shifted into high-gear and got to work designing what he dubbed to be the “Hazardous Gasses PCB.” This PCB will house the three gas sensors mentioned in his previous update post, and was designed to fit on top of the MSP-EXP432P401RMSP-EXP432P401R just like a normal “booster pack” with its pins carefully selected to avoid interference with other booster packs used in the project. There were however still pin conflicts with certain booster packs, and as such, Douglas created a table showing which pins each booster pack uses. He also advised that one should cross reference this list when using conflicting boards, and adjusting their jumper pins accordingly. Like the last, this update post was incredibly informative, and is a valuable resource to anyone who is mixing and matching booster packs on the MSP EXP432P401RMSP EXP432P401R.

 

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One odorless and quite deadly gas that was not mentioned earlier is Radon Gas, which is a radioactive noble gas that emits an alpha particle when it decays. Update six tackled this issue. These alpha particles are able to penetrate human flesh, killing the cells they penetrate, and sometimes modifying the DNA contained within them, which is what makes them so harmful to humans. While these alpha particles do not penetrate our exterior flesh very far, they are able to penetrate lung tissue quite well, leading to lung cancer and other illnesses when radon gas is inhaled. Unfortunately measuring Radon levels is a time consuming process that involves analog capture methods like charcoal canisters, and laboratory-grade measuring equipment.  In an attempt to somewhat detect the presence of radon gas, Douglas plans on using a Radiascan 701 radiation detector to detect a presence of alpha particles. This device features a USB port for remotely monitoring the data it collects which should allow for that data to be ported to the monitoring system fairly easy.

 

 

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In the project’s seventh update, Douglas posted a short video of himself unboxing the challenger kit, so head to the link above if you want to check that out. Moving on to update eight Doug went about configuring the system to work with the Sharp LCD booster packSharp LCD booster pack, which involved desoldering an SMD resistor and moving it to another location on the booster pack’s PCB. With that done, the next hurdle to overcome was getting the LCD and MSP-EXP432P401RMSP-EXP432P401R to play together nicely in Energia, which culminated in Douglas sharing the source code to make this happen, as well as a short demo video of the project so far.

 

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Update nine was a short one describing Douglas’ struggles with MQTT, some of which caused a lot of stress. If you are having trouble with MQTT and the MSP-EXP432P401R MSP-EXP432P401R, be sure to check out the link above for some links to additional software that might be required to make everything work as it should. His tenth update was quite short as well, with Douglas showcasing the Hazardous Factors Sensor PCB that had arrived. He includes a short demo video in each of these post, so be sure to check them out.

 

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A week later, we saw Douglas walking around his town and around his home checking the levels of extremely low frequency electromagnetic radiation that exist in everyday life. Everything from the power lines feeding our homes, to the electric razors we shave with emit ELF electromagnetic radiation. Measuring these levels at different locations could prove to be useful in studies on how certain technologies can cause harm to humans. Doug ended this post after displaying readings from around his town and home, and said that he would revisit the topic at a later date.

 

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Fast Forward a couple of weeks and Douglas has gotten more work done on the MQTT side of things, as well as finishing up the design and 3D printing of a housing for the various wearable sensor packages. This brings us up to the week fourteen project update post, which starts off with a demo video showing off the progress on the project so far, and ends with a short section on the radiation meter that Douglas purchased for the project.

 

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Week fifteen arrived with another project update post on microwaves, and their dangers to living organisms. Douglas showed off more test he had conducted. Unfortunately there was still no mention as to how he would integrate this data into the project, but he did summarize his findings and offer tips to help those interested reduce their exposure to microwave radiation.

 

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Another week passed which meant that another project update was to come. This time, we got a better look at the booster pack hardware stack fully assembled. Although Douglas was feeling a bit under the weather, he managed to finish assembling the gas sensor board, and showcased an older RF sensing board he built previously for another project. While he still had some of these boards, he opted to go with another pre-built solution that featured an OLED screen to display its data. Unfortunately the pre built unit that he ordered was sensitive in the wrong frequency range, forcing him to order another unit of the proper specifications.

 

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With the end of the challenge almost here, Douglas dedicated the project’s eighteenth update to showcasing what the completed project looked like and was capable of doing. He said that most of the previous week was spent designing and 3D printing more enclosures, and working out all of the mounting options as well as tweaking things to function better. The end result was nothing less than amazing, and what I feel is one of the better design challenge projects we have had here at Element14. The project continued on after this date (and the challenge’s closing) with Douglas running more microwave radiation test, project spin-off’s, and a couple (1, 2) of other update post showcasing more testing that he did after the challenge’s end. Be sure to check them out before you are finished with this summary.

 

That is going to wrap up my project summary coverage of project Invisible Hazardous Environmental Factors Monitoring System. After watching this project develop from the start, I was sure that it would place high with our judges, and my assumptions were correct. Douglas was named the grand prize winner of the Safe and Sound Wearables Design Challenge. While my coverage, opinions, and writings have no weight with the judges, I felt that this project was the clear winner due to its in depth updates, and how educational nearly all of its blog post were. Douglas tackled many issues head first, and instead of abandoning the project, or removing features, he found solutions to them, even if that solution took days to figure out. Douglas has always had very well written and very technical yet easy to follow project updates, so I expected nothing less from him, and he did just that. Future challengers would be wise to study his past projects, and take note of how they flow, and the level of detail they feature. This post is getting quite long, so I am going to end it here. If you have not yet read through the whole project, I highly suggest doing so by visiting its blog page. Tune in later this week for another Design Challenge Project Summary here at Element14. Until then, Hack The World, and Make Awesome!  

Welcome to installment number twenty eight  of the Design Challenge Project Summary series here at Element14. For those of you who are new to my content, in this series I chose  a single Design Challenge project from current or past challenges, and write a short summary of the project to date. I am selective about which projects I summarize, as I want to highlight quality content. Unfortunately, projects that stall out, or get abandoned, are not chosen for summaries. Some project creators like to keep their own project summary going, and this series is not meant to overshadow those post, but to highlight each project from an outsider's perspective.

 

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The subject of this installment is project Trackable Safety Helmet for Miners which was part of the Safe & Sound Design Challenge. The project’s designer, Mehmet Bozdal (mbozdal), said that his idea for a trackable safety helmet came to be after he learned of the extreme dangers and subsequent catastrophic disasters that claim dozens of lives every year for those on the front lines in the coal mining industry. Citing methane gas explosions as being the main cause of these disasters, his trackable safety helmet could help provide an early warning of high-gas levels, and also provide a trackable beacon in the event of an emergency.

 

In the project’s introductory post Mehmet posits that since methane gas is the main cause of the majority of coal mine explosions, he should focus a significant portion of his project on detecting and warning the miners of the pending danger. To do this, he needs to use a gas sensor that is capable of detecting methane concentrations as low as 5%, the minimum amount of the gas that is needed to promote ignition. With this knowledge he decided to use a Methane CNG Gas Sensor which is capable of detecting methane concentrations from 200 parts per million (ppm) to 10,000 ppm.

 

With a gas sensor chosen, Mehmet moved on to identifying more parameters that might alert the miners of worsening conditions within the mine shaft, and settled on building out the helmet to monitor several more factors including temperature, barometric pressure, and relative humidity as each of these metrics can change the point at which the methane gas could ignite. Other talking points covered in his introductory post include the addition of an RFID and IMU tracking systems, and implementation of a wireless communication link between the miners and a centralized system that would be able to aggregate all of the data collected from the miners helmets which could be analyzed to trigger a warning system, as well as reporting each miner’s position in the mine shaft. 

 

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The regulations for electronics in explosive environments was the focus for the project’s second update post, and it really helped bring into focus how dangerous this could really be. Many people believe that a spark is required for ignition, but in a gas-rich environment, something as simple as an overheating voltage regulator could trigger ignition if its temperature rises too high. Since this testing is quite time consuming, and very costly, Mehmet acknowledges that this type of testing is outside the scope of this project, and that he wanted to mention this type of testing anyway because if this project were brought to market, it would have to receive the proper testing.

 

“Simple device is defined 3.12 of the ANSI/ISA-RP 12.6-1987 as any device which will neither generate nor store more than 1.2 volts, 0.1 amps, 25 mW or 20 μJ." Simple devices can be used intrinsically safe and do not need to be approved. Therefore, LEDs, thermocouples may not need an approval. Unfortunately, my design is not in this category because it requires 3.3V or even 5V for sensors This means that this particular design should be tested in accredited testing laboratories. This is way beyond the aim of the contest and my capabilities (at least for now ),” he said.

 

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With the basics of intrinsic safety covered, it was time to move on with the project and start thinking about how the safety helmet will communicate with different systems within the mine and on the surface as well. While wireless communication is the obvious solution here, but Mehmet has to contend with a lot of earth between the miners and the control room on the surface. To combat this, mines generally have two different communication systems (primary and secondary) that help negate this issue. Primary communication systems usually operate in the high frequency and very high frequency ranges while secondary communication systems work in the low frequency range so that its more powerful signal can punch through the earth and make its way to the surface. Visit the project’s 3rd update to learn more about the protocols that drive these systems and to find out which solution Mehmet chose for this project.

 

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In the project’s fourth update, Mehmet gleefully informed us that his challenger kit had arrived after an unexpected trip to Canada. This allowed the project to move from the planning stage, to getting some actual prototyping work done. To get started, he selected the MSP432 and Wi-Fi boosterpack which would allow him to begin the initial configuration in the next update.

 

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Admitting that he had never used a RTOS before, Mehmet moved into update 5 by challenging himself to learn the basics of TI-RTOS instead of taking the easy way out and using Energia, and Arduino-like IDE designed to make programming the MSP432 series easy. To get started he briefly showed readers how to configure a timer within TI-RTOS and how to write and configure a client on the CC3100 module. To finish up the post, Mehmet showed off a small “Ground Operations Center”  program that he wrote to get the project started. He said that while this is just a basic socket program at the moment, he would add more features in the future.

 

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After a two week absence, Mehmet returned with his sixth update post. This update was all about getting some sensors up and running, but as Murphy’s Law states, whatever can go wrong, will go wrong. While working on interfacing the sensor booster pack, Mehmet discovered that the sample code provided with the sensor pack did not work with TI-RTOS, despite the raw sample code working on its own. This was an issue because integrating the raw sensor code with the WiFi code, could cause timing issues which is something he would like to avoid. To remedy this, Mehmet decided to forego the TI sensor booster pack, and move to an Arduino to collect the sensor data he needs.

 

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Update seven was short, but we saw more work completed on the helmet’s sensors, and the methods used to get data from the Arduino and MSP432 boards to the central computer. Mehmet's plans have the project utilizing each boards serial port to transfer data back to the computer, but this meant that he would have to add the UART driver to the WiFi code he wrote previously that connects the MSP432 to his wireless network. He includes this updated code as well as the TCP Echo source code at the end of this post. Finishing things up, mehmet  said that he “has ordered a MSP430 for NFC communication. It will control the gate and send data to the computer via serial port.”

 

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While the idea to use an arduino to capture the data was a good one at the time, Mehmet was not happy with the fact that the arduino’s size created a problem with being able to fit the project neatly into a safety helmet. This forced him to sit down and modify the Sparkfun MSP432 library to add in support for the ADXL345. With this complete, he was able to remove the Arduino completely from the project, and return to the original plan of using the MSP432 as the primary microcontroller for this project. This post was by far the most informative and well written so far, and I would highly suggest reading through it to learn more, and don’t forget to check out the source code Mehmet has included while you are there.

 

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Update nine was not very long but it confirmed a major milestone had been completed Utilizing the helmet for access control was always a part of what this project set out to accomplish and this is what Mehmet focused on for this update Using a passive RFID tag in combination with the  DLP-7970ABPDLP-7970ABP NFC Transceiver Boosterpack was able to write code that will send user IDs that have accessed a locked portion of the mine in an effort to generate accurate and up to date reports of which miner is at which location in the mine “It will read the tag and send the data over the serial port (the msp430 board convert serial to USB) to the Ground Operations Centre. The Ground Operations Centre will decide to doors open,” Mehmet said. “It registers the users who access the mining side so if multiple access occurred from a single tag it will deny the access.”

 

 

Mehmet continued work on the access control portion of the project in update ten, and showcased the system working with some new features in the video above. “The system is consist of NFC reader and NFC tag. In reality, short range RFDI system will be suitable hence NFC allows a few cms which is very short distance. However, the implementation of the system and how it works is completely the same,” he said. Mehmet included sample code, and a more thorough explanation of how this works in the body of the post, and I highly suggest checking it out, as it is quite informative, especially if you are trying to integrate NFC in your own MSP432 project.

 

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One of the best moments in a design challenge project is when everything comes together and the first working prototype is debuted. In update eleven was dedicated to just this milestone, with Mehmet demonstrating the Smart Helemt V0.1. “I will demonstrate the Smart Helmet v0.1  I am always on the move so I struggle to find time but slowly going further. Let's summarise what have done up to now. I am using TI-RTOS. I stack the Wi-Fi booster pack to MSP432. Connect ADXL345 accelerometer and TMP102 using I2C interface. Detect free-fall, inactivity, and send all the data to Ground Operations Center over Wi-Fi using TCP/IP protocol,” he explained. “I coded Ground Operations Center using C and it still needs some modifications  DLP-7970ABPDLP-7970ABP boosterpack is connected to Ground Operations Center via UART interface It controls the gate and doesn't allow unauthorised access and access without the helmet

 

 

Update twelve continued the demonstration, this time giving us a video walk through of what the helmet is capable of. Unfortunately, this is the point in the project in which we find out that the original plan to include a methane sensor was scrapped due to the fact that a portable version of the methane sensor that is required simply does not exist. This is because all of the small methane sensors utilize a heating element for analysis, and that heating element would cause the helmet to fail intrinsic safety testing, and would likely cause an explosion in a gas-rich environment. While this is a bummer, Mehmet did not let this bump in the road stop progress on the project. In the video above you can see the helmet and its electronics working and sending data back to the Ground Operations Center.

 

That is going to wrap up my project summary coverage of project Trackable Safety Helmet for Miners. While this project was not as rich with knowledge as some of the others in the Safe and Sound Wearables Challenge, I chose to include it here because it illustrates what a complete project can be. All too often we see many projects that hit a major bump in the road, which causes progress to stall, if not die out completely. Despite several large hurdles, Mehmet continued to press forward with the project, and in the end, this perseverance led to him receiving an honorable mention from the judges.  If you have not yet read through the whole project, I highly suggest doing so by visiting its blog page. Tune in later this week for another Design Challenge Project Summary here at Element14. Until then, Hack The World, and Make Awesome!  

 

The Upcycle It Design Challenge achieved liftoff in March of 2017 and marked our second challenge of the year, and what a challenge it would become! The challenge tasked its participants to up-cycle an obsolete item, computer, piece of electronic equipment or appliance and make a cool new electronics project built around the Intel® Edison Kit for Arduino. The participants did just that, as this challenge saw record numbers of updates being posted each week, and the resulting projects were nothing short of amazing.

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Featured as the second design challenge of 2017, the Upcycle It design challenge tasks its participants to upcycle an obsolete item, computer, piece of electronic equipment or appliance and make a cool new electronics project built around the Intel® Edison Kit for Arduino.

 

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Challengers will build their projects using an official assortment of parts from Arduino, Intel, and Element14. Each kit contains the following items:

 

The Upcycle it Design Challenge features 15 official challengers that received a Challenger Kit for FREE, but thereafter anyone can join the Challenge simply by posting in the Upcycle it space (tagging their blogs 'upcycle it') to be in with a chance to win prizes. Anyone completing a project by the June 4th deadline and posting at least 10 times on the Community detailing their project build will be in the running to win some awesome prizes, including a Keithley DMM7510 Digital MultimeterKeithley DMM7510 Digital Multimeter worth almost $4,000.

 

*The official Challengers must build their project in accordance with the challenge's terms and conditions. All projects must include the Intel® Edison.

 

 

The Challengers and Their Projects

 

 

The Winners

 

 

 

 

 

My Top Projects

 

 

There were a few projects that I considered quite exceptional during this challenge. I do not have any set criteria that I use to determine what makes a great project, but I do look at a few key factors when determining which projects I feel are awesome. I also want to note that my opinion on which projects were the best have no bearing on the judge’s decisions, and my opinion is my own and is not the opinion of Element14. So I am going to list my three favorite projects from this challenge, and highlight my favorite update from its timeline. I would love to hear from all of my readers on which project was their favorite, and why that particular project stood out for them.

 

 

Nixie Display #8 - Controlling the nixie tubes

 

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Nixie tubes have always held a certain curiosity for me, and I think that my interest in them go back to the cold war era scifi movies I would watch as a kid that had these huge computers and control panels filled with the tubes. Im sure that it also has something to do with the ominous glow that they omit, and the retro feel they ad to an environment, but my love of Nixies is not what I am here to write about. Gerrit’s nixie display is nothing short of gorgeous and is quite ingenious in how he merged such a dated piece of technology into modern times. More importantly though, each of Gerrit’s post were very informative and full of photos, diagrams, and source code so that others could follow along at home easily. I chose his eighth update for this feature because it is a prime example of how well written Gerrit’s post are. The entire project is worth reading from beginning to end, but if you only have time to check out one of the many entries, this one is the one you should read.

 

 

Upcycled Clock – Summary

 

 

Clocks have long been one of the household items that I felt needed an update to bring them into something more than a single function role. There are companies making smart clocks that can answer your questions via a voice assistant, and others that can mimic the rising sun with RGB LED technology, but there has been a serious lack of innovation around clocks in the DIY / Maker scene. This is why Carmelito’s project was such a wonderful breath of fresh air to me. With integration such as weather and traffic monitoring, email and twitter notifications, and adding a voice assistant made this project really stand out, and ultimately is why this project was chosen as the grand prize winner. Much like Gerrit Polder’s project, every update was on point, and featured all of the elements that make a great update. I have spent almost an hour trying to decide which post from this project to feature, and in the end, I am not able to come to a conclusion, so I decided to share it’s summary post, so check it out!

 

 

Interactive Race Car Driver - Furby Hacking

 

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[Image Credit: Kelly Heaton]

 

Furby’s are one of the coolest and creepiest consumer toys that has been released in the last two decades, and Andy Clark (workshopshed) has shared his autopsy of one of the creepy little mechatronic creatures in one of his updates to project Interactive Race Car Driver. If any of the current, or future challengers are wondering how to structure their project, Andy has done an excellent job with this project. His post are informative, and filled with information, as well as research sources, something that I absolutely love seeing! I must say though, I am a little envious of Andy, as I would love to get my hands on one of these little guys to hack on a bit. Before losing my home to a fire in 2012, I had been collecting Furby’s with the intent of hacking them to small X-Mod RC Cars and trying to make them swarm when near each other. Unfortunately that project died with the rest of my lab in the fire. I may return to it someday still though. Head over to the link above for Andy’s full autopsy of the Furby!

 

 

A Complete List Of My Content On This Design Challenge

 

Below are links to each piece of content I wrote that pertained to this challenge.

 

 

 

Final Thoughts

 

I have been writing about DIY electronics, electrical engineering, makers, and DIYers for over a decade now, and the projects that appear in these design challenges always seem to amaze me. It’s not just the actual projects themselves, but it's also the people who make the projects that make them so intriguing. As a content creator, and someone who builds projects just to document their build, I understand how daunting of a task it can be to produce a weekly update to that project that includes photos, code, and thorough explanations of what you accomplished over the last several days. Its not an easy thing to do, and Murphy’s law is always present when trying to build a project from scratch. This is why I have so much respect for each challenger who completes their project, or at least attempts to post weekly updates.

 

I want to take a moment and thank everyone who participated in this challenge. Logging in every week and seeing that there were 10+ updates posted was an amazing feeling, and it let me know that these challenges are so much more than just a list of cool projects. They are filled with amazing people who are part of a wonderful community, and are also a source of inspiration, education, and entertainment for so many. So with that, I tip my hat to all of the challengers who left me absolutely astonished at the level of talent and intelligence we have here at Element14 who are willing to share their knowledge and tackle fairly large projects with ease.

 

With that said, I am going to end my coverage of the Up-Cycle It Design Challenge here. Thank you for returning every week to read my updates, and for cheering on the challenger's time and time again! We truly are a community here at Element14, and these challenges and their participants are proof of that. I’ll be back in a few weeks when the next challenge kicks off, so until then, remember to Hack The World and Make Awesome!

Safe and Sound Wearables Design Challenge Summary

 

 

Back in February the Safe and Sound Wearables design challenge officially kicked off, marking the beginning the 2017 Design Challenge Series her at Element14, and what an interesting challenge it was. Originally slated for a fifteen week run, the Safe and Sound Wearables challenge was extended by an additional ten weeks to give some challengers who had issues receiving their official hardware kits some time to catch up.

 

Fourteen projects were chosen to participate, with their creators receiving an official challenger kit that contains the sponsored hardware that must be used to create their projects. The challenge was not limited to these fourteen people though, and anyone could enter their project into the challenge as long as they included Texas Instruments’ latest micro-controller (MSP-EXP432P401RMSP-EXP432P401R) into a wearable that is Safe & Sound.

Safe & Sound Design Challenge

 

 

About The Challenge

 

 

Featured as the first design challenge of 2017, the Safe & Sound Wearables challenge tasks its participants to conceive and build a 'safe and sound’ wearable that protects a person from personal and environmental risks, or monitors personal health or protects personal property from theft.

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Texas-Instruments-logo-design.png                        DJI_Innovations_logo.svg.png

 

On February 14th 2017 Element14 announced the list of the official 15 challengers picked to participate in the challenge, and those 15 challengers received a kit of components to use in their design which was sponsored by Texas Instruments. Each kit contains the following items:

 

Participation in this challenge is not limited to the sponsored challengers however. Anyone can enter, and all they have to do is Design with TI - integrating Texas Instruments’ latest microcontroller (MSP-EXP432P401R) MSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPadMSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPad into a wearable that is Safe & Sound.

 

The Challengers and Their Projects

 

 

The Winners

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First Prize Winner: dougw

Invisible Hazardous Environmental Factors Monitoring System

 

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Runner Up Prize Winner: dwinhold

Cold Weather Survival Suit

Honorable Mentions:

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    Featured from left to right: Trackable Safety Helmet for Miners, T-Shirt for Monitoring Elderly and Physically Challenged Patients, Wearable Tracking Device for Miners and Safety Jacket for the Tolling Industry

 

My Top Projects

 

There were a few projects that I considered quite exceptional during this challenge. I do not have any set criteria that I use to determine what makes a great project, but I do look at a few key factors when determining which projects I feel are awesome. I also want to note that my opinion on which projects were the best have no bearing on the judge’s decisions, and my opinion is my own and is not the opinion of Element14. So I am going to list my three favorite projects from this challenge, and highlight my favorite update from its timeline. I would love to hear from all of my readers on which project was their favorite, and why that particular project stood out for them.

 

Project : Safety Jacket For the Tolling Industry - By Inderpreet Singh

 

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First off, if you are not familiar with Inderpreet Singh (ipv1) you need to stop reading this article and head over to his profile to check out some of his content. A familiar face to the design challenge series, and someone I admire and respect quite a good bit, Inderpreet is the real deal when it comes to encompassing what a maker and engineer truly is. His project for this challenge embodied what a true wearable is, and quite frankly should be. From designing his own power pack PCB for the project, to summiting every mountain-like issue that arose, this project earned the top spot in my favorite’s for its ingenuity, engineering, and well written update post.

 

It’s a well known fact that when people are passionate about the things they create, those things become better overall. This is evident in Steve Jobs and his drive for form, function, and user experience in designing the iPhone, iPad, and MacBook products early on in their life. I attribute this same type of passion and drive for how well Inderpreet’s Companion Jacket turned out. If you are curious about why he was so driven to create a jacket that would help to better protect those in the tolling industry, head over to the project’s introduction post. When you are finished there, check out the project in its entirety on its blog page.

 

 

Project : Invisible Hazardous Environmental Factors Monitoring System - By Douglas Wong

 

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Douglas Wong (dougw) is yet another Design Challenge veteran who always seems to impress not only me, but many members in the community who follow his projects with vigor. The story was no different with project Invisible Hazardous Environmental Factors Monitoring System, and personally, I feel that he knocked this one out of the park. I actually had a tough time deciding between this project, and Inderpreet Singh’s because they are both so good. While Inderpreet definitely created an amazing set of wearable devices that are part of clothing, Doug’s monitoring system is a completely independent wearable that can be placed over existing clothing. Additionally, it provides a wealth of information that is instantly visible to the wearer due to the LCD screens that accompany each of the four modules. This project, like the aforementioned sensor filled shirt was perfectly detailed throughout its construction, and I would expect nothing less from Doug.

 

Project : Winter Survival Suit - By Dale Winhold

 

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This project brought back the young kid who played with “learning electronics” kits from Radio Shack in me. All those years ago, I would tinker with my spring board kit building AM Radios from schematics designed by Forrest Mimms III, and then dream about one day building a mechatronic suit that would allow me to record environmental data and relay it back to the secret base while battling an army of evil robots. (Im not kidding, I really use to daydream about stuff like that.) Dale Winhold’s (dwinhold) suit brought back a lot of memories for me, especially the wiring diagrams I use to draw showing how all of the suits sensors and weapons would connect to a central computer.

 

Like the other two challengers I featured in this wrap-up, Dale is no amateur when it comes to the Design Challenge series, and once again he rose to the challenge and conquered its objectives like a true professional. His update post were informative, media rich, and full of valuable information. If you have not followed Dale’s journey down the Safe & Sound path over its 25 week journey, head over to the project’s blog for the full rundown.

 

 

Complete List Of My Content On This Design Challenge

 

Below are links to each piece of content I wrote that pertained to this challenge.

 

Weekly Summaries

 

 

 

Final Thoughts

For many years I have all but wrote off the wearables industry as just a passing fad that will not survive without some true innovation taking place before 2020. The concept of things like smart watches, smart jewelry, and hoodies with speakers in the hood’s feel too much like novelties to me, and I have only seen a few concepts so far that really give me the WOW factor. Even the wearables projects in the maker community have been a bit bland with a few exceptions here and there. When I learned that Element14 would be hosting a wearables themed Design Challenge, my initial thought was “Yay, more blinking LEDs sewn into hats, dresses, and shoes.” but then I learned that the concept would be to challenge people to build a wearable that makes their daily life more safe and sound, which made me slightly more energetic about the idea.

 

I read over a few of the proposals early on and I was quite impressed and embarrassed at the same time. The embarrassment was because I was so quick to discount the original concept to blinking LEDs and trinkets. I have never been more wrong in my life. Several of the challengers who were chosen to participate in this challenge simply blew me away with the projects they conceived and then brought to fruition over those 25-weeks. I will say that some of the challengers who did not take their project’s serious enough, or abandoned them all together, truly missed out on an opportunity to show skeptics like me, that wearables can be a viable part of everyday life, and that the category is not just limited to smart watches, blinking LED wristbands at theme parks, or novelty trinkets that are limited in function.

 

So with that, I tip my hat to all of the challengers who left me absolutely astonished at the level of talent and intelligence we have here at Element14 who are willing to share their knowledge and tackle fairly large projects with ease. While participation slowed in the last several weeks, I want to thank those who stuck with it, and pushed through to see their project finished, or very close to finished. I look forward to reading everyone’s updates each week, and being allowed to sort of MC these challenges is truly an honor that I cherish.  With that said, I am going to end my coverage of the Safe & Sound Wearables Design Challenge here. Thank you for returning every week to read my updates, and for cheering on the challenger's time and time again! We truly are a community here at Element14, and these challenges and their participants are proof of that. I’ll be back in a few weeks when the next challenge kicks off, so until then, remember to Hack The World and Make Awesome!

DCWklyGnrcHdr.png

 

Welcome to another installment in the Design Challenge Weekly Summary series here at Element14! It’s week Nineteen of the Safe and Sound Wearables Design Challenge which means we have came to the end of this challenge. Additionally, the winners of the Upcycle It Challenge have been announced. I decided to wait an extra week to finish up my coverage of the first two design challenges of this year so that I could cover any projects that finished up shortly after the deadline, so we have a lot to cover so let's just jump into it!

 

 

Safe & Sound Design Challenge

 

Featured as the first design challenge of 2017, the Safe & Sound Wearables challenge tasks its participants to conceive and build a 'safe and sound’ wearable that protects a person from personal and environmental risks, or monitors personal health or protects personal property from theft.

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Texas-Instruments-logo-design.png                        DJI_Innovations_logo.svg.png

 

On February 14th 2017 Element14 announced the list of the official 15 challengers picked to participate in the challenge, and those 15 challengers received a kit of components to use in their design which was sponsored by Texas Instruments. Each kit contains the following items:

 

Participation in this challenge is not limited to the sponsored challengers however. Anyone can enter, and all they have to do is Design with TI - integrating Texas Instruments’ latest microcontroller (MSP-EXP432P401R) MSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPadMSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPad into a wearable that is Safe & Sound.

 

 

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past two weeks, June 18 - June 30, we have had a total of five updates posted across three projects. With this being my final weekly update that covers the Safe and Sound Wearables Challenge, I will highlight each project that received an update for this timeperiod.  

 

 

 

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

 

    • Gas Sensor Demo - blog 21

 

 

In his 21st update to project Invisible Hazardous Environmental Factors Monitoring System Douglas Wong (dougw) demonstrates the alcohol sensor, the CO2 sensor and the UV sensors used in the wearable pack. Check out the video above to see the test results, and head over the full update to find out how well the sensor pack worked in the field when Douglas wore it to work to monitor the air quality throughout his workday.

 

 

    • Trackable Safety Helmet for Miners #12: Smart Helmet Video Demonstration

 

 

After moving components from the breadboard to a PCB, Mehmet Bozdal (mbozdal)attempted to find a methane sensor for his project, Trackable Safety Helmet for Miners but decided to exclude that element from the final design as gas sensors require a heating element, which could spark an explosion deep inside a mine. Nevertheless Mehmet pushed forward and posted an impressive demo video of the helmet in action. Check it out in the video above, and then head over to the full update post for to review his source code, and some other data.

 

    • Flood early-warning Alarm Pack #7: Capacity Touch Sensor

 

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Flooding early-warning Alarm Pack by Feng Yao (fyaocn) earns the final spot in my featured updates list for this challenge. After being absent for a few weeks, Feng Yao is back and informed us of some issues that he was having with getting the capacitive sensor portion of his project up and running. In the end he did manage to get the capacitive sensors somewhat working, but he will change things up a little in the final design. Head over to his 7th, 8th, and 9th updates for more info.

 

 

Before I wrap things up I want to give a big congratulations to the winners of the Upcycyle It With Intel Edison Design Challenge! This challenge was one of my all time favorites, and it was filled with a wealth of information, and had record breaking participation almost every week of its run. I have listed the winners below, so be sure to check out their projects if you have not already!

 

    1. Grand Prize Winner - Project: Wake up to the Upcycled Clock By Carmelito Andrade (carmelito)
    2. Runner Up - Project: PDU Upcycle for Automation by Jason Wier (jasonwier92)
    3. Third Place - Project: Nixie Display by Gerrit Polder (gpolder)

 

 

That is going to wrap up my coverage of both the Safe & Sound Wearables Design Challenge and the Upcycle It Design Challenge. Remember to keep your eyes peeled for our next design challenge and my weekly update series! Until then, you can find me hanging out in the Arduino Projects section as I will be posting a series of projects over the summer and possibly into the fall, and as always, remember to hack the world and make awesome!

DCWklyGnrcHdr.png

 

Welcome to another installment in the Design Challenge Weekly Summary series here at Element14! It’s week eighteen of the Safe and Sound Wearables Design Challenge which means we have about a week before the project deadline. We had four update post this week, so let's just jump into it!

 

Safe & Sound Design Challenge

 

Featured as the first design challenge of 2017, the Safe & Sound Wearables challenge tasks its participants to conceive and build a 'safe and sound’ wearable that protects a person from personal and environmental risks, or monitors personal health or protects personal property from theft.

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Texas-Instruments-logo-design.png                        DJI_Innovations_logo.svg.png

 

On February 14th 2017 Element14 announced the list of the official 15 challengers picked to participate in the challenge, and those 15 challengers received a kit of components to use in their design which was sponsored by Texas Instruments. Each kit contains the following items:

 

Participation in this challenge is not limited to the sponsored challengers however. Anyone can enter, and all they have to do is Design with TI - integrating Texas Instruments’ latest microcontroller (MSP-EXP432P401R) MSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPadMSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPad into a wearable that is Safe & Sound.

 

 

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, June 11 - June 17, we have had a total of four updates posted across three projects. Since only three projects were updated, I will select two and highlight them briefly below, but first let's take a quick look at what projects were updated in the past seven days.

 

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

    • Trackable Safety Helmet for Miners #11: Smart Helmet V0.1

 

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In his eleventh update, Mehmet Bozdal (mbozdal) demo’s his trackable safety helmet for miners.“Let's summarise what have done up to now I am using TI-RTOS I stack the Wi-Fi booster pack to MSP432 Connect ADXL345 accelerometer and TMP102 using I2C interface Detect free-fall inactivity and send all the data to Ground Operations Center over Wi-Fi using TCP/IP protocol I coded Ground Operations Center using C and it still needs some modifications  DLP-7970ABPDLP-7970ABP boosterpack is connected to Ground Operations Center via UART interface It controls the gate and doesn't allow unauthorised access and access without the helmet he said. “In this week, I added a buzzer and pressure sensor. The buzzer is driven by PWM and pressure sensor is read using the analogue input. For pressure, I have used FSR 402 Interlink Electronics. Actually, it is force sensing resistor. It is resistance changes based on the applied force and it is not sensitive but it shows the idea.” The full source code can be found in this update at the link above.

 

 

    • Winter Survival Suit Post #12

 

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Dispite waging a battle against the flu, Dale Winhold (dwinhold) has managed to provide us with the 12th update to his project, Winter Survival Suit. This week he worked on wiring in the heaters that will help maintain a safe body temperature, and also managed to address some concerns as to moisture issues that could wreak havoc on the suits electronics. “One of the biggest concerns of mine as well as others is moisture. I have solved this issue with the electronics, I am using a conformal coating to waterproof all electronics and wiring (this is shown in a previous blog),” he said. “I have been testing the heating elements (Made from carbon fiber) to see what happens if they get wet from moisture. There isn't any effect to the element if it gets a bit damp from moisture, no shorting or over heating. Now the element heats up from the positive being hooked to 1 end and the negative hooked to the other. I haven't tested to see what happens if the element gets soaked in water as of yet.”

 

 

That is going to wrap up things for this week. Remember to check back next week for another Design Challenge Weekly Summary post. Until then head over to the official Safe & Sound Wearables Challenge Page, fore more Design Challenge content! As always, remember to hack the world and make awesome!

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Welcome to another installment in the Design Challenge Weekly Summary series here at Element14! It’s week seventeen of the Safe and Sound Wearables Design Challenge which means we have about two weeks before the project deadline. We don’t have a lot to cover, so let's just jump into it!

 

 

Safe & Sound Design Challenge

 

Featured as the first design challenge of 2017, the Safe & Sound Wearables challenge tasks its participants to conceive and build a 'safe and sound’ wearable that protects a person from personal and environmental risks, or monitors personal health or protects personal property from theft.

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Texas-Instruments-logo-design.png                        DJI_Innovations_logo.svg.png

 

On February 14th 2017 Element14 announced the list of the official 15 challengers picked to participate in the challenge, and those 15 challengers received a kit of components to use in their design which was sponsored by Texas Instruments. Each kit contains the following items:

 

Participation in this challenge is not limited to the sponsored challengers however. Anyone can enter, and all they have to do is Design with TI - integrating Texas Instruments’ latest microcontroller (MSP-EXP432P401R) https://www.element14.com/community/view-product.jspa?fsku=2473128&nsku=41Y9541&COM=noscriptMSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPad into a wearable that is Safe & Sound.

 

 

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, June 4 - June 10, we have had a total of three updates posted across two projects. Since only two projects were updated, I will select an update from each and highlight them briefly below, but first let's take a quick look at what projects were updated in the past seven days. 

 

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

    • T-Shirt for Monitoring Elderly and Physically Challenged Patients #11 : Time to wear it!

 

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Our first featured update comes from Sakthivigneshwar R’s (sakthi.1260) project, T-Shirt for Monitoring Elderly and Physically Challenged Patients. It’s been a long journey to this point, but this project is finally complete, and as you can see from the image above, the shirt is successfully monitoring vital signs, and exporting that data to a custom mobile app. “So far we tried to sense vitals, struggled capturing the Data learning the launchpad and the buggy Energia IDE and my noise problem, (well found out that was because of Ground Loop We fixed a little but still it exists, had to hold my breath for few seconds to get a proper values),” Sakthivigneshwar said. “Still we made things move forward, well spent sleepless nights trying to connect the BLE Booster pack finally ending up with a alternate solution and pushing data into the cloud.”

 

 

    • Hearing Guard System #13: MSP432 and CC3100 MQTT with Websockets Part 1 & 2

 

 

In updates thirteen and fourteen Jon Morss (jomoenginer) set out to get MQTT up and running on the MSP432 and CC3100, and I must say that both of these post are great resources for anyone wanting to pair MQTT and the MSP432. Head over to both links above for the full rundown.

 

 

That is going to wrap up things for this week. Remember to check back next week for another Design Challenge Weekly Summary post. Until then head over to the official Safe & Sound Wearables Challenge Page, as well as the Upcycle It Challenge’s landing page fore more Design Challenge conten! As always, remember to hack the world and make awesome!

DCWklyGnrcHdr.png

 

Welcome to another installment in the Design Challenge Weekly Summary series here at Element14! It’s week sixteen of the Safe and Sound Wearables Design Challenge and this week also marks the twelfth week of the Upcycle it Design Challenge. We have a couple of new project updates from the Safe and Sound challenge, and quite a few new updates to the UpCycle It challenge as it concludes just one day after our coverage range for this week. We have a lot to cover, so let's just jump right into it.

 

Safe & Sound Design Challenge

 

Featured as the first design challenge of 2017, the Safe & Sound Wearables challenge tasks its participants to conceive and build a 'safe and sound’ wearable that protects a person from personal and environmental risks, or monitors personal health or protects personal property from theft.

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Texas-Instruments-logo-design.png                        DJI_Innovations_logo.svg.png

 

On February 14th 2017 Element14 announced the list of the official 15 challengers picked to participate in the challenge, and those 15 challengers received a kit of components to use in their design which was sponsored by Texas Instruments. Each kit contains the following items:

 

Participation in this challenge is not limited to the sponsored challengers however. Anyone can enter, and all they have to do is Design with TI - integrating Texas Instruments’ latest microcontroller (MSP-EXP432P401R) MSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPad into a wearable that is Safe & Sound.

 

 

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, May 28 - June 3, we have had a total of two updates posted across two individual projects. With just two updates over the last week I have decided to only highlight one post this week. Before we get to that, let's take a quick look at which projects were updated in the past seven days.

 

 

This Week’s Top Update

 

    • Trackable Safety Helmet for Miners #10: Access Control Showcase

 

 

 

In update number ten of Mehmet Bozdal’s (mbozdal) project, he works to implement a near field system that will prevent the mine from granting entrance to a worker who is not wearing their safety helmet. “The idea of this part is not allowing the miner to access mining area without the helmet (or can be any safety clothes) so providing the safety. It also records the access control which makes managing and planning easier," he said.” I like this idea as it ensures that employees entering a dangerous area are fully equipped with the personal safety gear needed to protect them from hazards." Head over to the link above for more info on how the system works, and to check out the source code that has been provided.

 

Upcycle It Design Challenge

 

About The Challenge

 

Featured as the second design challenge of 2017, the Upcycle It design challenge tasks its participants to upcycle an obsolete item, computer, piece of electronic equipment or appliance and make a cool new electronics project built around the Intel® Edison Kit for Arduino.

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Challengers will build their projects using an official assortment of parts from Arduino, Intel, and Element14. Each kit contains the following items:

 

The Upcycle it Design Challenge features 15 official challengers that received a Challenger Kit for FREE, but thereafter anyone can join the Challenge simply by posting in the Upcycle it space (tagging their blogs 'upcycle it') to be in with a chance to win prizes. Anyone completing a project by the June 4th deadline and posting at least 10 times on the Community detailing their project build will be in the running to win some awesome prizes, including a Keithley DMM7510 Digital Multimeter worth almost $4,000.

 

*The official Challengers must build their project in accordance with the challenge's terms and conditions. All projects must include the Intel® Edison.

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, May 28 - June 3, we have had a total of eighteen updates posted across nine projects. With so many projects this week I will be highlighting two that I found helpful, educational, or just interesting in general. Next week I will write a complete wrap up post on this challenge, so stay tuned for that!  Before we get to this week’s highlighted post,let's take a quick look at which projects were updated in the past seven days.

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

    • Washing Machine Hydroponic Grower - #8 Nutrient Solution System

 

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In update number eight of project Washing Machine Hydroponic Grower, Fernando Hila (nandohila) walks us through how he added a nutrient resivoir and pumping system to help aid in getting water and nutrients into the plant’s growing medium. As Hila said, “Conventional hydroponic systems consist in a reservoir for the nutrient solution and a pump that delivers this solution to the growing trays as required. For rotary systems, the solution normally doesn't need to be pumped as the growing bed will be partly submerged into the reservoir so every complete turn will deliver nutrient to all plants inside the drum.In our case, we have a limited volume of water we can store on the bottom of the washing machine drum so we have to combine the 2 methods.” The solution to add a reservoir and pump system worked brilliantly, and I am quite impressed at how well this turned out. Check out the link above for the full post.

 

 

 

    • Embedded Web SDR client on Analog Radio Receiver #10: Making the Web SDR Client work!

 

2017-06-07 21_38_44-[Upcycle it Design Challenge] Embedded Web SDR ... _ element14 _ Upcycle It.png

 

Konstantinos Konstas (konstantinoskonstas) has been hard at work on his project, Embedded Web SDR client on Analog Radio Receiver, and in his latest update, he tackles the task of creating his Web SDR client actually work the way he designed it to. After some advice from the community, he finally decided on which software stacks to go with to make the project finally come together. “At first I saw CEF, Chromium Embedded Framework, and then going down the list with the  many unknown buzzwords, I was caught by the name Headles Chromium. It explained: Chromium feature activated with the --headlesss flag, currently availible in the nightly build of Chromium, not yet released,” he said. “I hit the link and Bingo. What I read sounded very promising to me.” This post is rich with great knowledge, so head over at the link above to check it out.

 

    • Nixie Display #13 - Wrap up

 

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My third and final featured update for this week centers around Gerrit Polder’s (gpolder) project, Nixie Display, and while I will talk more about the projects that made it to the finish line in next week’s post, I wanted to take a moment to acknowledge what an excellent summary post Gerrit wrote about his Nixie Display project. I have written dozens of project summaries here, and this post is exactly what I like to see. I especially like the use of Nixie tube photographs being used as post number markers! I want to thank Gerrit for such a wonderful project, and I can not wait to see what lies int he future for him! Head over to his wrap up post for the full rundown.

 

 

 

 

 

That is going to wrap up things for this week. I want to take a moment to apologize again for this post being late. With the Intel Edison Upcycle It design challenge now over, I will write a full challenge summary post next week, so remember to check back next week for that as well as another Design Challenge Weekly Summary post. Until then head over to the official Safe & Sound Wearables Challenge Page, as well as the Upcycle It Challenge’s landing page fore more Design Challenge content! As always, remember to hack the world and make awesome!

DCWklyGnrcHdr.png

 

Welcome to another installment in the Design Challenge Weekly Summary series here at Element14! It’s week fifteen of the Safe and Sound Wearables Design Challenge and this week also marks the eleventh week of the Upcycle It Design Challenge. Project updates rose a little this week in the Safe and Sound challenge, while the participants in the UpCycle It challenge continued with another solid week of updates across several projects. We have a lot to cover, so let's just jump right into it.

 

Safe & Sound Design Challenge

 

Featured as the first design challenge of 2017, the Safe & Sound Wearables challenge tasks its participants to conceive and build a 'safe and sound’ wearable that protects a person from personal and environmental risks, or monitors personal health or protects personal property from theft.

 

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Texas-Instruments-logo-design.png                        DJI_Innovations_logo.svg.png

 

On February 14th 2017 Element14 announced the list of the official 15 challengers picked to participate in the challenge, and those 15 challengers received a kit of components to use in their design which was sponsored by Texas Instruments. Each kit contains the following items:

 

Participation in this challenge is not limited to the sponsored challengers however. Anyone can enter, and all they have to do is Design with TI - integrating Texas Instruments’ latest microcontroller (MSP-EXP432P401R) MSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPadMSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPad into a wearable that is Safe & Sound.

 

 

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, May 21 - May 27, we have had a total of four updates posted across four individual projects. As with each of my updates,This week I will be highlighting two updates from this challenge. Before we get to that, let's take a quick look at which projects were updated in the past seven days. 

 

 

This Week’s Top Update

 

 

    • Invisible Hazardous Environmental Factors Monitoring System - blog 18

 

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It appears that Douglas Wong (dougw)is the first challenger to bring his project to completion, and to him I offer my congratulations on a job well done! In update 18 of project Invisible Hazardous Environmental Factors Monitoring System, Douglas shows off the results of months worth of design, engineering, and 3D printing work, and I have to say that I think the end prototype turned out very well, and quite polished. “I've enjoyed experimenting with lots of TI modules in the past but EXP432P401R MCUEXP432P401R MCU is going to be my new favorite for complex micro-controller projects - this project didn't even cause it to break a sweat, either in speed or resources. It is easy to use and the price is attractive for an ARM Cortex M4 module,” he said. “If you are thinking about entering a design challenge like this, I heartily recommend it - there is tremendous satisfaction in completing such a project.”

 

    • Winter/Cold weather survival suit Post 11

 

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After recovering from a series of issues involving the temperature sensors he used in the survival suit, Dale Winhold (dwinhold) posted an update that brings us up to speed on the progress he has made in getting the sensors temporarily hooked up to the Launchpad via a custom proto-board he was forced to build after realizing that he was out of blank copper clad. Dale says that he will be etching his own board once he has more copper clad in stock, but for now this will have to do. Head over to the full update for more information, and to see a list of what’s left to do on the Winter/Cold Weather Survival Suit.

 

 

Upcycle It Design Challenge

 

About The Challenge

 

Featured as the second design challenge of 2017, the Upcycle It design challenge tasks its participants to upcycle an obsolete item, computer, piece of electronic equipment or appliance and make a cool new electronics project built around the Intel® Edison Kit for Arduino.

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Challengers will build their projects using an official assortment of parts from Arduino, Intel, and Element14. Each kit contains the following items:

 

The Upcycle it Design Challenge features 15 official challengers that received a Challenger Kit for FREE, but thereafter anyone can join the Challenge simply by posting in the Upcycle it space (tagging their blogs 'upcycle it') to be in with a chance to win prizes. Anyone completing a project by the June 4th deadline and posting at least 10 times on the Community detailing their project build will be in the running to win some awesome prizes, including a Keithley DMM7510 Digital MultimeterKeithley DMM7510 Digital Multimeter worth almost $4,000.

 

*The official Challengers must build their project in accordance with the challenge's terms and conditions. All projects must include the Intel® Edison.

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, April 21 - May 27, we have had a total of thirteen updates posted across eight projects. With so many projects this week I will be highlighting two that I found helpful, educational, or just interesting in general. Before we get to this week’s highlighted post,let's take a quick look at which projects were updated in the past seven days. 

 

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

    • Interactive Race Car Driver - Hooking up the Furby

 

 

 

As I have said previously, one of the creepiest things you could possibly ever hack is a furby, and Andy Clark (Workshopshed) is successfully doing just that. In one of his latest updates, Andy managed to get some of the little animatronic’s movements working, and being controlled by the Intel Edison. There was a bit of an issue with the creature’s eyelids not re-opening once closed, but a little ingenuity, and some careful knife work, and the skinless little robot could once again open its eyes. Head over to the full post for more info on how he accomplished this!

 

 

    • PDU #12 - Details: Home Assistant Integration

 

 

If you have followed my content here at Element14, you might remember me writing about the uncanny timeliness that these challenges have in relation to some of my own projects. I was beginning to think that this streak was broken, but Jason Wier (jasonwier92) has came through and once again proved my theory right. In update number twelve of his project, PDU, Jason begins integrating a home automation software suite called Home Assistant into the custom power distribution unit. What makes this post so much of a coincidence for me is the fact that I was just looking at doing something similar with Home Assistant and a smaller PDU I recently purchased for my home network rack. Cheers Jason, and thanks for the tips! Hit up the link above for the full update!

 

That is going to wrap up things for this week. I want to take a moment to apologize again for this post being late. Remember to check back next week for another Design Challenge Weekly Summary post. Until then head over to the official Safe & Sound Wearables Challenge Page, as well as the Upcycle It Challenge’s landing page fore more Design Challenge content! As always, remember to hack the world and make awesome!

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Welcome to another installment in the Design Challenge Weekly Summary series here at Element14! It’s week fourteen of the Safe and Sound Wearables Design Challenge and this week also marks the tenth week of the Upcycle it Design Challenge. Project updates were again a little light this week in the Safe and Sound challenge, while the participants in the UpCycle It challenge continued with another solid week of updates across several projects. We have a lot to cover, so let's just jump right into it.

 

Safe & Sound Design Challenge

 

Featured as the first design challenge of 2017, the Safe & Sound Wearables challenge tasks its participants to conceive and build a 'safe and sound’ wearable that protects a person from personal and environmental risks, or monitors personal health or protects personal property from theft.

 

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

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On February 14th 2017 Element14 announced the list of the official 15 challengers picked to participate in the challenge, and those 15 challengers received a kit of components to use in their design which was sponsored by Texas Instruments. Each kit contains the following items:

 

Participation in this challenge is not limited to the sponsored challengers however. Anyone can enter, and all they have to do is Design with TI - integrating Texas Instruments’ latest microcontroller (MSP-EXP432P401R) MSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPadMSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPad into a wearable that is Safe & Sound.

 

 

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, May 14 - May 20, we have had a total of two updates posted across two  individual projects. As with each of my updates, I like to highlight at least three of the past week’s updates, but with just two updates this week I will be highlighting just one of these projects. Before we get to that, let's take a quick look at which projects were updated in the past seven days.

 

 

This Week’s Top Update

 

    • T-Shirt for Monitoring Elderly and Physically Challenged Patients #9 : Back on Track, Meet Mr.Edison

 

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After recovering from a PC crash, Sakthivigneshwar R (sakthi.1260) is back on track with his project, T-Shirt for Monitoring Elderly and Physically Challenged Patients after a two week absence. In this weeks update, he works getting the Intel Edison talking to the Texas Instruments Launchpad, so that the Launchpad can relay important sensor data back for processing. To do this Bluetooth was utilized, and after writing a short Arduino sketch, the two boards were successfully talking to each other. Hit the link above for the full rundown, and to view the sketch.

 

Upcycle It Design Challenge

 

About The Challenge

 

Featured as the second design challenge of 2017, the Upcycle It design challenge tasks its participants to upcycle an obsolete item, computer, piece of electronic equipment or appliance and make a cool new electronics project built around the Intel® Edison Kit for Arduino.

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Challengers will build their projects using an official assortment of parts from Arduino, Intel, and Element14. Each kit contains the following items:

 

The Upcycle it Design Challenge features 15 official challengers that received a Challenger Kit for FREE, but thereafter anyone can join the Challenge simply by posting in the Upcycle it space (tagging their blogs 'upcycle it') to be in with a chance to win prizes. Anyone completing a project by the June 4th deadline and posting at least 10 times on the Community detailing their project build will be in the running to win some awesome prizes, including a Keithley DMM7510 Digital MultimeterKeithley DMM7510 Digital Multimeter worth almost $4,000.

 

*The official Challengers must build their project in accordance with the challenge's terms and conditions. All projects must include the Intel® Edison.

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, April 14 - May 20, we have had a total of thirteen updates posted across nine projects. With so many projects this week I will be highlighting three that I found helpful, educational, or just interesting in general. Before we get to this week’s highlighted post,let's take a quick look at which projects were updated in the past seven days.

 

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

    • Washing Machine Hydroponic Grower - #6 Drum Modification

 

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It’s been a few weeks since we last heard from Fernando Hila (nandohila), but progress is still moving forward on project Washing Machine Hydroponic Grower. In this week’s update he clued readers in on what type of baskets and growing medium he would be using inside the washing machine’s basket. “I got some small growing baskets measuring around Ø 55mm and 35mm high. Those baskets comes with a foam/sponge that is the growing medium for the plant. I found this basket type the most suitable to this application as other types of growing mediums wouldn't stay in place once the drum start turning,” he said. Check out the full post at the link above!

 

 

    • Stay focused in the sky #4: 3D printed gears and the stepper motor is mounted

 

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Our second featured post this week focuses on yet another project that has been absent as of late. In update number four of Miguel Angel Garcia Fuentes’ (pcmike2099) project Stay Focused In The Sky took a major leap forward with the design and 3D printing of a set of gears that are to be mounted to the telescope mount. While this update is not very information rich, I decided to feature it to remind the challengers that I really like to see the design files for parts such as this shared with the community at home. This allows those wanting to replicate your project, all the necessary things to do so. It’s still a nice update, but it could be even better if the files were available for download. Check out the link above for more!

 

    • Embedded Web SDR client on Analog Radio Receiver #8: Problem with Audio.

 

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Konstantinos Konstas’ (konstantinoskonstas) project, Embedded Web SDR client on Analog Radio Receiver hit a small snag this past week when the USB Audio dongle he purchased for the project having issued when interfacing with the Intel Edison. “I had tested the card before,in terms of Linux connectivity and I was confident that it was working as I have been using that USB Audio dongle for over a year now in my Amateur Radio activities with a number of programs for decoding/encoding digital data and was quite happy with it,” he said. “It worked under Linux and Win10 as well, so when I probed it from the Edison and saw the dongle's red led blinking, indicating that the card should be working I felt sure that everything was OK. Well not exactly the case. I plugged the headphone output to my amp system but no sound would be produced. I ran my little demo from Yocto bash but again no sound. However, the card was properly selected and the “aplay” command would only blink the dongle's led.” He solved this issue by replacing the audio card with another module. Hit the link above to read the full update!

 

 

That is going to wrap up things for this week. I want to take a moment to apologize again for this post being late. I caught cold last week that morphed into a full blown illness by the weekend, and I am just now beginning to recover. Hopefully I can return to my normal schedule next week, so remember to check back next week for another Design Challenge Weekly Summary post. Until then head over to the official Safe & Sound Wearables Challenge Page, as well as the Upcycle It Challenge’s landing page fore more Design Challenge content! As always, remember to hack the world and make awesome!