Skip navigation
1 2 3 4 Previous Next

Design Challenges

116 posts

DCWklyGnrcHdr.png

 

Welcome to another installment in the Design Challenge Weekly Summary series here at Element14! It’s week eighteen of the Safe and Sound Wearables Design Challenge which means we have about a week before the project deadline. We had four update post this week, so let's just jump into it!

 

Safe & Sound Design Challenge

 

Featured as the first design challenge of 2017, the Safe & Sound Wearables challenge tasks its participants to conceive and build a 'safe and sound’ wearable that protects a person from personal and environmental risks, or monitors personal health or protects personal property from theft.

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Texas-Instruments-logo-design.png                        DJI_Innovations_logo.svg.png

 

On February 14th 2017 Element14 announced the list of the official 15 challengers picked to participate in the challenge, and those 15 challengers received a kit of components to use in their design which was sponsored by Texas Instruments. Each kit contains the following items:

 

Participation in this challenge is not limited to the sponsored challengers however. Anyone can enter, and all they have to do is Design with TI - integrating Texas Instruments’ latest microcontroller (MSP-EXP432P401R) MSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPadMSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPad into a wearable that is Safe & Sound.

 

 

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, June 11 - June 17, we have had a total of four updates posted across three projects. Since only three projects were updated, I will select two and highlight them briefly below, but first let's take a quick look at what projects were updated in the past seven days.

 

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

    • Trackable Safety Helmet for Miners #11: Smart Helmet V0.1

 

WhatsApp+Image+2017-06-11+at+18.29.29.jpeg

 

 

In his eleventh update, Mehmet Bozdal (mbozdal) demo’s his trackable safety helmet for miners.“Let's summarise what have done up to now I am using TI-RTOS I stack the Wi-Fi booster pack to MSP432 Connect ADXL345 accelerometer and TMP102 using I2C interface Detect free-fall inactivity and send all the data to Ground Operations Center over Wi-Fi using TCP/IP protocol I coded Ground Operations Center using C and it still needs some modifications  DLP-7970ABPDLP-7970ABP boosterpack is connected to Ground Operations Center via UART interface It controls the gate and doesn't allow unauthorised access and access without the helmet he said. “In this week, I added a buzzer and pressure sensor. The buzzer is driven by PWM and pressure sensor is read using the analogue input. For pressure, I have used FSR 402 Interlink Electronics. Actually, it is force sensing resistor. It is resistance changes based on the applied force and it is not sensitive but it shows the idea.” The full source code can be found in this update at the link above.

 

 

    • Winter Survival Suit Post #12

 

Switches.jpg

 

Dispite waging a battle against the flu, Dale Winhold (dwinhold) has managed to provide us with the 12th update to his project, Winter Survival Suit. This week he worked on wiring in the heaters that will help maintain a safe body temperature, and also managed to address some concerns as to moisture issues that could wreak havoc on the suits electronics. “One of the biggest concerns of mine as well as others is moisture. I have solved this issue with the electronics, I am using a conformal coating to waterproof all electronics and wiring (this is shown in a previous blog),” he said. “I have been testing the heating elements (Made from carbon fiber) to see what happens if they get wet from moisture. There isn't any effect to the element if it gets a bit damp from moisture, no shorting or over heating. Now the element heats up from the positive being hooked to 1 end and the negative hooked to the other. I haven't tested to see what happens if the element gets soaked in water as of yet.”

 

 

That is going to wrap up things for this week. Remember to check back next week for another Design Challenge Weekly Summary post. Until then head over to the official Safe & Sound Wearables Challenge Page, fore more Design Challenge content! As always, remember to hack the world and make awesome!

DCWklyGnrcHdr.png

 

Welcome to another installment in the Design Challenge Weekly Summary series here at Element14! It’s week seventeen of the Safe and Sound Wearables Design Challenge which means we have about two weeks before the project deadline. We don’t have a lot to cover, so let's just jump into it!

 

 

Safe & Sound Design Challenge

 

Featured as the first design challenge of 2017, the Safe & Sound Wearables challenge tasks its participants to conceive and build a 'safe and sound’ wearable that protects a person from personal and environmental risks, or monitors personal health or protects personal property from theft.

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Texas-Instruments-logo-design.png                        DJI_Innovations_logo.svg.png

 

On February 14th 2017 Element14 announced the list of the official 15 challengers picked to participate in the challenge, and those 15 challengers received a kit of components to use in their design which was sponsored by Texas Instruments. Each kit contains the following items:

 

Participation in this challenge is not limited to the sponsored challengers however. Anyone can enter, and all they have to do is Design with TI - integrating Texas Instruments’ latest microcontroller (MSP-EXP432P401R) https://www.element14.com/community/view-product.jspa?fsku=2473128&nsku=41Y9541&COM=noscriptMSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPad into a wearable that is Safe & Sound.

 

 

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, June 4 - June 10, we have had a total of three updates posted across two projects. Since only two projects were updated, I will select an update from each and highlight them briefly below, but first let's take a quick look at what projects were updated in the past seven days. 

 

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

    • T-Shirt for Monitoring Elderly and Physically Challenged Patients #11 : Time to wear it!

 

Screenshot_20170609-160514.png

 

Our first featured update comes from Sakthivigneshwar R’s (sakthi.1260) project, T-Shirt for Monitoring Elderly and Physically Challenged Patients. It’s been a long journey to this point, but this project is finally complete, and as you can see from the image above, the shirt is successfully monitoring vital signs, and exporting that data to a custom mobile app. “So far we tried to sense vitals, struggled capturing the Data learning the launchpad and the buggy Energia IDE and my noise problem, (well found out that was because of Ground Loop We fixed a little but still it exists, had to hold my breath for few seconds to get a proper values),” Sakthivigneshwar said. “Still we made things move forward, well spent sleepless nights trying to connect the BLE Booster pack finally ending up with a alternate solution and pushing data into the cloud.”

 

 

    • Hearing Guard System #13: MSP432 and CC3100 MQTT with Websockets Part 1 & 2

 

 

In updates thirteen and fourteen Jon Morss (jomoenginer) set out to get MQTT up and running on the MSP432 and CC3100, and I must say that both of these post are great resources for anyone wanting to pair MQTT and the MSP432. Head over to both links above for the full rundown.

 

 

That is going to wrap up things for this week. Remember to check back next week for another Design Challenge Weekly Summary post. Until then head over to the official Safe & Sound Wearables Challenge Page, as well as the Upcycle It Challenge’s landing page fore more Design Challenge conten! As always, remember to hack the world and make awesome!

DCWklyGnrcHdr.png

 

Welcome to another installment in the Design Challenge Weekly Summary series here at Element14! It’s week sixteen of the Safe and Sound Wearables Design Challenge and this week also marks the twelfth week of the Upcycle it Design Challenge. We have a couple of new project updates from the Safe and Sound challenge, and quite a few new updates to the UpCycle It challenge as it concludes just one day after our coverage range for this week. We have a lot to cover, so let's just jump right into it.

 

Safe & Sound Design Challenge

 

Featured as the first design challenge of 2017, the Safe & Sound Wearables challenge tasks its participants to conceive and build a 'safe and sound’ wearable that protects a person from personal and environmental risks, or monitors personal health or protects personal property from theft.

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Texas-Instruments-logo-design.png                        DJI_Innovations_logo.svg.png

 

On February 14th 2017 Element14 announced the list of the official 15 challengers picked to participate in the challenge, and those 15 challengers received a kit of components to use in their design which was sponsored by Texas Instruments. Each kit contains the following items:

 

Participation in this challenge is not limited to the sponsored challengers however. Anyone can enter, and all they have to do is Design with TI - integrating Texas Instruments’ latest microcontroller (MSP-EXP432P401R) MSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPad into a wearable that is Safe & Sound.

 

 

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, May 28 - June 3, we have had a total of two updates posted across two individual projects. With just two updates over the last week I have decided to only highlight one post this week. Before we get to that, let's take a quick look at which projects were updated in the past seven days.

 

 

This Week’s Top Update

 

    • Trackable Safety Helmet for Miners #10: Access Control Showcase

 

 

 

In update number ten of Mehmet Bozdal’s (mbozdal) project, he works to implement a near field system that will prevent the mine from granting entrance to a worker who is not wearing their safety helmet. “The idea of this part is not allowing the miner to access mining area without the helmet (or can be any safety clothes) so providing the safety. It also records the access control which makes managing and planning easier," he said.” I like this idea as it ensures that employees entering a dangerous area are fully equipped with the personal safety gear needed to protect them from hazards." Head over to the link above for more info on how the system works, and to check out the source code that has been provided.

 

Upcycle It Design Challenge

 

About The Challenge

 

Featured as the second design challenge of 2017, the Upcycle It design challenge tasks its participants to upcycle an obsolete item, computer, piece of electronic equipment or appliance and make a cool new electronics project built around the Intel® Edison Kit for Arduino.

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Challengers will build their projects using an official assortment of parts from Arduino, Intel, and Element14. Each kit contains the following items:

 

The Upcycle it Design Challenge features 15 official challengers that received a Challenger Kit for FREE, but thereafter anyone can join the Challenge simply by posting in the Upcycle it space (tagging their blogs 'upcycle it') to be in with a chance to win prizes. Anyone completing a project by the June 4th deadline and posting at least 10 times on the Community detailing their project build will be in the running to win some awesome prizes, including a Keithley DMM7510 Digital Multimeter worth almost $4,000.

 

*The official Challengers must build their project in accordance with the challenge's terms and conditions. All projects must include the Intel® Edison.

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, May 28 - June 3, we have had a total of eighteen updates posted across nine projects. With so many projects this week I will be highlighting two that I found helpful, educational, or just interesting in general. Next week I will write a complete wrap up post on this challenge, so stay tuned for that!  Before we get to this week’s highlighted post,let's take a quick look at which projects were updated in the past seven days.

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

    • Washing Machine Hydroponic Grower - #8 Nutrient Solution System

 

pastedImage_6.png

 

In update number eight of project Washing Machine Hydroponic Grower, Fernando Hila (nandohila) walks us through how he added a nutrient resivoir and pumping system to help aid in getting water and nutrients into the plant’s growing medium. As Hila said, “Conventional hydroponic systems consist in a reservoir for the nutrient solution and a pump that delivers this solution to the growing trays as required. For rotary systems, the solution normally doesn't need to be pumped as the growing bed will be partly submerged into the reservoir so every complete turn will deliver nutrient to all plants inside the drum.In our case, we have a limited volume of water we can store on the bottom of the washing machine drum so we have to combine the 2 methods.” The solution to add a reservoir and pump system worked brilliantly, and I am quite impressed at how well this turned out. Check out the link above for the full post.

 

 

 

    • Embedded Web SDR client on Analog Radio Receiver #10: Making the Web SDR Client work!

 

2017-06-07 21_38_44-[Upcycle it Design Challenge] Embedded Web SDR ... _ element14 _ Upcycle It.png

 

Konstantinos Konstas (konstantinoskonstas) has been hard at work on his project, Embedded Web SDR client on Analog Radio Receiver, and in his latest update, he tackles the task of creating his Web SDR client actually work the way he designed it to. After some advice from the community, he finally decided on which software stacks to go with to make the project finally come together. “At first I saw CEF, Chromium Embedded Framework, and then going down the list with the  many unknown buzzwords, I was caught by the name Headles Chromium. It explained: Chromium feature activated with the --headlesss flag, currently availible in the nightly build of Chromium, not yet released,” he said. “I hit the link and Bingo. What I read sounded very promising to me.” This post is rich with great knowledge, so head over at the link above to check it out.

 

    • Nixie Display #13 - Wrap up

 

IMG_2808.jpg

 

My third and final featured update for this week centers around Gerrit Polder’s (gpolder) project, Nixie Display, and while I will talk more about the projects that made it to the finish line in next week’s post, I wanted to take a moment to acknowledge what an excellent summary post Gerrit wrote about his Nixie Display project. I have written dozens of project summaries here, and this post is exactly what I like to see. I especially like the use of Nixie tube photographs being used as post number markers! I want to thank Gerrit for such a wonderful project, and I can not wait to see what lies int he future for him! Head over to his wrap up post for the full rundown.

 

 

 

 

 

That is going to wrap up things for this week. I want to take a moment to apologize again for this post being late. With the Intel Edison Upcycle It design challenge now over, I will write a full challenge summary post next week, so remember to check back next week for that as well as another Design Challenge Weekly Summary post. Until then head over to the official Safe & Sound Wearables Challenge Page, as well as the Upcycle It Challenge’s landing page fore more Design Challenge content! As always, remember to hack the world and make awesome!

DCWklyGnrcHdr.png

 

Welcome to another installment in the Design Challenge Weekly Summary series here at Element14! It’s week fifteen of the Safe and Sound Wearables Design Challenge and this week also marks the eleventh week of the Upcycle It Design Challenge. Project updates rose a little this week in the Safe and Sound challenge, while the participants in the UpCycle It challenge continued with another solid week of updates across several projects. We have a lot to cover, so let's just jump right into it.

 

Safe & Sound Design Challenge

 

Featured as the first design challenge of 2017, the Safe & Sound Wearables challenge tasks its participants to conceive and build a 'safe and sound’ wearable that protects a person from personal and environmental risks, or monitors personal health or protects personal property from theft.

 

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Texas-Instruments-logo-design.png                        DJI_Innovations_logo.svg.png

 

On February 14th 2017 Element14 announced the list of the official 15 challengers picked to participate in the challenge, and those 15 challengers received a kit of components to use in their design which was sponsored by Texas Instruments. Each kit contains the following items:

 

Participation in this challenge is not limited to the sponsored challengers however. Anyone can enter, and all they have to do is Design with TI - integrating Texas Instruments’ latest microcontroller (MSP-EXP432P401R) MSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPadMSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPad into a wearable that is Safe & Sound.

 

 

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, May 21 - May 27, we have had a total of four updates posted across four individual projects. As with each of my updates,This week I will be highlighting two updates from this challenge. Before we get to that, let's take a quick look at which projects were updated in the past seven days. 

 

 

This Week’s Top Update

 

 

    • Invisible Hazardous Environmental Factors Monitoring System - blog 18

 

IHEF_system1.jpg

 

It appears that Douglas Wong (dougw)is the first challenger to bring his project to completion, and to him I offer my congratulations on a job well done! In update 18 of project Invisible Hazardous Environmental Factors Monitoring System, Douglas shows off the results of months worth of design, engineering, and 3D printing work, and I have to say that I think the end prototype turned out very well, and quite polished. “I've enjoyed experimenting with lots of TI modules in the past but EXP432P401R MCUEXP432P401R MCU is going to be my new favorite for complex micro-controller projects - this project didn't even cause it to break a sweat, either in speed or resources. It is easy to use and the price is attractive for an ARM Cortex M4 module,” he said. “If you are thinking about entering a design challenge like this, I heartily recommend it - there is tremendous satisfaction in completing such a project.”

 

    • Winter/Cold weather survival suit Post 11

 

DSC01123.JPG

 

After recovering from a series of issues involving the temperature sensors he used in the survival suit, Dale Winhold (dwinhold) posted an update that brings us up to speed on the progress he has made in getting the sensors temporarily hooked up to the Launchpad via a custom proto-board he was forced to build after realizing that he was out of blank copper clad. Dale says that he will be etching his own board once he has more copper clad in stock, but for now this will have to do. Head over to the full update for more information, and to see a list of what’s left to do on the Winter/Cold Weather Survival Suit.

 

 

Upcycle It Design Challenge

 

About The Challenge

 

Featured as the second design challenge of 2017, the Upcycle It design challenge tasks its participants to upcycle an obsolete item, computer, piece of electronic equipment or appliance and make a cool new electronics project built around the Intel® Edison Kit for Arduino.

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Challengers will build their projects using an official assortment of parts from Arduino, Intel, and Element14. Each kit contains the following items:

 

The Upcycle it Design Challenge features 15 official challengers that received a Challenger Kit for FREE, but thereafter anyone can join the Challenge simply by posting in the Upcycle it space (tagging their blogs 'upcycle it') to be in with a chance to win prizes. Anyone completing a project by the June 4th deadline and posting at least 10 times on the Community detailing their project build will be in the running to win some awesome prizes, including a Keithley DMM7510 Digital MultimeterKeithley DMM7510 Digital Multimeter worth almost $4,000.

 

*The official Challengers must build their project in accordance with the challenge's terms and conditions. All projects must include the Intel® Edison.

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, April 21 - May 27, we have had a total of thirteen updates posted across eight projects. With so many projects this week I will be highlighting two that I found helpful, educational, or just interesting in general. Before we get to this week’s highlighted post,let's take a quick look at which projects were updated in the past seven days. 

 

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

    • Interactive Race Car Driver - Hooking up the Furby

 

 

 

As I have said previously, one of the creepiest things you could possibly ever hack is a furby, and Andy Clark (Workshopshed) is successfully doing just that. In one of his latest updates, Andy managed to get some of the little animatronic’s movements working, and being controlled by the Intel Edison. There was a bit of an issue with the creature’s eyelids not re-opening once closed, but a little ingenuity, and some careful knife work, and the skinless little robot could once again open its eyes. Head over to the full post for more info on how he accomplished this!

 

 

    • PDU #12 - Details: Home Assistant Integration

 

 

If you have followed my content here at Element14, you might remember me writing about the uncanny timeliness that these challenges have in relation to some of my own projects. I was beginning to think that this streak was broken, but Jason Wier (jasonwier92) has came through and once again proved my theory right. In update number twelve of his project, PDU, Jason begins integrating a home automation software suite called Home Assistant into the custom power distribution unit. What makes this post so much of a coincidence for me is the fact that I was just looking at doing something similar with Home Assistant and a smaller PDU I recently purchased for my home network rack. Cheers Jason, and thanks for the tips! Hit up the link above for the full update!

 

That is going to wrap up things for this week. I want to take a moment to apologize again for this post being late. Remember to check back next week for another Design Challenge Weekly Summary post. Until then head over to the official Safe & Sound Wearables Challenge Page, as well as the Upcycle It Challenge’s landing page fore more Design Challenge content! As always, remember to hack the world and make awesome!

DCWklyGnrcHdr.png

 

Welcome to another installment in the Design Challenge Weekly Summary series here at Element14! It’s week fourteen of the Safe and Sound Wearables Design Challenge and this week also marks the tenth week of the Upcycle it Design Challenge. Project updates were again a little light this week in the Safe and Sound challenge, while the participants in the UpCycle It challenge continued with another solid week of updates across several projects. We have a lot to cover, so let's just jump right into it.

 

Safe & Sound Design Challenge

 

Featured as the first design challenge of 2017, the Safe & Sound Wearables challenge tasks its participants to conceive and build a 'safe and sound’ wearable that protects a person from personal and environmental risks, or monitors personal health or protects personal property from theft.

 

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Texas-Instruments-logo-design.png                        DJI_Innovations_logo.svg.png

 

On February 14th 2017 Element14 announced the list of the official 15 challengers picked to participate in the challenge, and those 15 challengers received a kit of components to use in their design which was sponsored by Texas Instruments. Each kit contains the following items:

 

Participation in this challenge is not limited to the sponsored challengers however. Anyone can enter, and all they have to do is Design with TI - integrating Texas Instruments’ latest microcontroller (MSP-EXP432P401R) MSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPadMSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPad into a wearable that is Safe & Sound.

 

 

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, May 14 - May 20, we have had a total of two updates posted across two  individual projects. As with each of my updates, I like to highlight at least three of the past week’s updates, but with just two updates this week I will be highlighting just one of these projects. Before we get to that, let's take a quick look at which projects were updated in the past seven days.

 

 

This Week’s Top Update

 

    • T-Shirt for Monitoring Elderly and Physically Challenged Patients #9 : Back on Track, Meet Mr.Edison

 

WP_20170514_01_19_47_Pro.jpg

 

After recovering from a PC crash, Sakthivigneshwar R (sakthi.1260) is back on track with his project, T-Shirt for Monitoring Elderly and Physically Challenged Patients after a two week absence. In this weeks update, he works getting the Intel Edison talking to the Texas Instruments Launchpad, so that the Launchpad can relay important sensor data back for processing. To do this Bluetooth was utilized, and after writing a short Arduino sketch, the two boards were successfully talking to each other. Hit the link above for the full rundown, and to view the sketch.

 

Upcycle It Design Challenge

 

About The Challenge

 

Featured as the second design challenge of 2017, the Upcycle It design challenge tasks its participants to upcycle an obsolete item, computer, piece of electronic equipment or appliance and make a cool new electronics project built around the Intel® Edison Kit for Arduino.

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Challengers will build their projects using an official assortment of parts from Arduino, Intel, and Element14. Each kit contains the following items:

 

The Upcycle it Design Challenge features 15 official challengers that received a Challenger Kit for FREE, but thereafter anyone can join the Challenge simply by posting in the Upcycle it space (tagging their blogs 'upcycle it') to be in with a chance to win prizes. Anyone completing a project by the June 4th deadline and posting at least 10 times on the Community detailing their project build will be in the running to win some awesome prizes, including a Keithley DMM7510 Digital MultimeterKeithley DMM7510 Digital Multimeter worth almost $4,000.

 

*The official Challengers must build their project in accordance with the challenge's terms and conditions. All projects must include the Intel® Edison.

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, April 14 - May 20, we have had a total of thirteen updates posted across nine projects. With so many projects this week I will be highlighting three that I found helpful, educational, or just interesting in general. Before we get to this week’s highlighted post,let's take a quick look at which projects were updated in the past seven days.

 

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

    • Washing Machine Hydroponic Grower - #6 Drum Modification

 

IMG_20170512_182715968.jpg

 

It’s been a few weeks since we last heard from Fernando Hila (nandohila), but progress is still moving forward on project Washing Machine Hydroponic Grower. In this week’s update he clued readers in on what type of baskets and growing medium he would be using inside the washing machine’s basket. “I got some small growing baskets measuring around Ø 55mm and 35mm high. Those baskets comes with a foam/sponge that is the growing medium for the plant. I found this basket type the most suitable to this application as other types of growing mediums wouldn't stay in place once the drum start turning,” he said. Check out the full post at the link above!

 

 

    • Stay focused in the sky #4: 3D printed gears and the stepper motor is mounted

 

20170423_140125.jpg

 

Our second featured post this week focuses on yet another project that has been absent as of late. In update number four of Miguel Angel Garcia Fuentes’ (pcmike2099) project Stay Focused In The Sky took a major leap forward with the design and 3D printing of a set of gears that are to be mounted to the telescope mount. While this update is not very information rich, I decided to feature it to remind the challengers that I really like to see the design files for parts such as this shared with the community at home. This allows those wanting to replicate your project, all the necessary things to do so. It’s still a nice update, but it could be even better if the files were available for download. Check out the link above for more!

 

    • Embedded Web SDR client on Analog Radio Receiver #8: Problem with Audio.

 

old+usb.jpg

 

Konstantinos Konstas’ (konstantinoskonstas) project, Embedded Web SDR client on Analog Radio Receiver hit a small snag this past week when the USB Audio dongle he purchased for the project having issued when interfacing with the Intel Edison. “I had tested the card before,in terms of Linux connectivity and I was confident that it was working as I have been using that USB Audio dongle for over a year now in my Amateur Radio activities with a number of programs for decoding/encoding digital data and was quite happy with it,” he said. “It worked under Linux and Win10 as well, so when I probed it from the Edison and saw the dongle's red led blinking, indicating that the card should be working I felt sure that everything was OK. Well not exactly the case. I plugged the headphone output to my amp system but no sound would be produced. I ran my little demo from Yocto bash but again no sound. However, the card was properly selected and the “aplay” command would only blink the dongle's led.” He solved this issue by replacing the audio card with another module. Hit the link above to read the full update!

 

 

That is going to wrap up things for this week. I want to take a moment to apologize again for this post being late. I caught cold last week that morphed into a full blown illness by the weekend, and I am just now beginning to recover. Hopefully I can return to my normal schedule next week, so remember to check back next week for another Design Challenge Weekly Summary post. Until then head over to the official Safe & Sound Wearables Challenge Page, as well as the Upcycle It Challenge’s landing page fore more Design Challenge content! As always, remember to hack the world and make awesome!

DCWklyGnrcHdr.png

 

Welcome to another installment in the Design Challenge Weekly Summary series here at Element14! It’s week thirteen of the Safe and Sound Wearables Design Challenge and this week also marks the ninth week of the Upcycle it Design Challenge. Project updates were again a little light this week in the Safe and Sound challenge, while the participants in the UpCycle It challenge continued with another solid week of updates across several projects. We have a lot to cover, so let's just jump right into it.

 

 

Safe & Sound Design Challenge

 

Featured as the first design challenge of 2017, the Safe & Sound Wearables challenge tasks its participants to conceive and build a 'safe and sound’ wearable that protects a person from personal and environmental risks, or monitors personal health or protects personal property from theft.

 

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Texas-Instruments-logo-design.png                        DJI_Innovations_logo.svg.png

 

On February 14th 2017 Element14 announced the list of the official 15 challengers picked to participate in the challenge, and those 15 challengers received a kit of components to use in their design which was sponsored by Texas Instruments. Each kit contains the following items:

 

Participation in this challenge is not limited to the sponsored challengers however. Anyone can enter, and all they have to do is Design with TI - integrating Texas Instruments’ latest microcontroller (MSP-EXP432P401R) MSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPadMSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPad into a wearable that is Safe & Sound.

 

 

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, May 7 - May 13, we have had a total of three updates posted across three  individual projects. As with each of my updates, I like to highlight at least three of the past week’s updates, but with just three updates this week I will be highlighting just two of these projects. Before we get to that, let's take a quick look at which projects were updated in the past seven days.

 

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

    • Environmental Factors - GAS Sensors - blog 16

 

GasSensorModule.jpg

 

Returning for the second week in a row to this list is project Elemental Factors by Douglas Wong (dougw). This week Doug managed to get an update out despite being sick, and to get his sensor booster pack assembled and stacked with each of the modules that make up the sensor portion of his project. “The black module on the left is the CO2 sensor, at the bottom is the UV sensor, the orange sensor is an MQ3 (alcohol), the red sensor is an MQ7 (carbon monoxide), and the stainless sensor is an MQ135 (air quality). The 3 sensors at the right are in sockets, allowing any MQ sensor to be substituted. The pots allow me to adjust offset and gain of each signal to get the best range out of the A/D,” he said. Head over to the link above to read the full update.

 

 

    • Trackable Safety Helmet for Miners #8: ADXL345 Driver for MSP432

 

pastedImage_4.png

 

Project Trackable Safety Helemt For Miners by Mehmet Bozdal (mbozdal) received its eighth update this week with progress on getting the ADXL345ADXL345 working with the MSP432MSP432 that is the center of his project. “I modified the Sparkfun Arduino library for the MSP432 with the minimum setting. First, we need to wake-up accelerometer and tell it to take measurements. This is done sending commands to POWER_CTL register. Second, we need to set the range of the sensor. The range varies from 2g to 16g,” he said. “The more the range the less the sensitivity. I prefer the sensitivity so set it to 2g which is the default value. I may change this values when I embed the design inside the helmet and take real scenario measurements.” Check out the full post and read over the code examples that Mehmet has provided at the link above!

 

Upcycle It Design Challenge

 

About The Challenge

 

Featured as the second design challenge of 2017, the Upcycle It design challenge tasks its participants to upcycle an obsolete item, computer, piece of electronic equipment or appliance and make a cool new electronics project built around the Intel® Edison Kit for Arduino.

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Challengers will build their projects using an official assortment of parts from Arduino, Intel, and Element14. Each kit contains the following items:

 

The Upcycle it Design Challenge features 15 official challengers that received a Challenger Kit for FREE, but thereafter anyone can join the Challenge simply by posting in the Upcycle it space (tagging their blogs 'upcycle it') to be in with a chance to win prizes. Anyone completing a project by the June 4th deadline and posting at least 10 times on the Community detailing their project build will be in the running to win some awesome prizes, including a Keithley DMM7510 Digital MultimeterKeithley DMM7510 Digital Multimeter worth almost $4,000.

 

*The official Challengers must build their project in accordance with the challenge's terms and conditions. All projects must include the Intel® Edison.

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, April 6 - May 13, we have had a total of nine updates posted across seven projects. With so many projects this week I will be highlighting three that I found helpful, educational, or just interesting in general. Before we get to this week’s highlighted post,let's take a quick look at which projects were updated in the past seven days.

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

 

    • Commute time to work using Google Maps API

 

 

With a long work commute on his mind, Carmelito Andraded (carmelito) showed his readers this week how he planned on using his upcycled clock to give him a visual and audible indication of when he should leave for work to avoid traffic issues in his area. “If you live in California, specifically in Los Angeles and the surrounding counties you soon realize that the area has a huge traffic problem, which meant I had to find a more visual way of identifying, what is the ideal time to leave for work, which is normally a 25 to 30 mins commute on a good day,” he said. “The idea here is that as part of the final setup we are going to replace one of the mirror panels with a 3D printed part which diffuses the LEDs. Here is a quick video that demo’s the setup and I am using eSpeak to read out the time to work.” Check out the full post at the link above!

 

 

    • Nixie Display #9 - Hardware hacking

 

IMG_2787.jpg

 

It’s been a couple of weeks since I featured the progress being made on project Nixie Display, and Gerrit Polder (gpolder)has made some very nice progress! This week he set out to switch over to the smaller Intel Edison module, but ran into some issues with the logic level voltages. To fix this issue, Gerrit hacked in a 5V sparkfun logic level shifter board to bump up the 1.8v signal from the edison. “The GPIO levels of the Mini Breakout Board are 1.8V, instead of 5V like with the Edison Kit for Arduino and GROVE kit. So first action was to select and order logic level converters,” Polder said. “After some digging on the internet I found a couple of links to a Sparkfun bi-directional level converter with four channels which according to the references works for the Edison…” The link above will take you to the full update where you can find more info on using a logic level shifter with the Edison as well as a few other updates to the project.

 

 

    • Interactive Race Car Driver - Hotrodding the Edison

 

IMG_20170508_210647.jpg

 

My final featured update this week comes from Andy Clark (Workshopshed) and his project, Interactive Race Car Driver. While this update was not a very technical one, it just might be the first time in maker history that someone has added some very cool looking hot-rod header pipes to a development board! Using his 3D printer, Andy crafted up a set of faux exhaust pipe headers to give his Edison board a more sporty feel, and to better tie it aesthetically into the project. Head over to the link above to read the full update and to download the printable file for the exhaust headers!

 

 

That is going to wrap up things for this week. Remember to check back next week for another Design Challenge Weekly Summary post. Until then head over to the official Safe & Sound Wearables Challenge Page, as well as the Upcycle It Challenge’s landing page fore more Design Challenge content! As always, remember to hack the world and make awesome!

DCWklyGnrcHdr.png

 

Welcome to another installment in the Design Challenge Weekly Summary series here at Element14! It’s week twelve of the Safe and Sound Wearables Design Challenge and this week also marks the eighth week of the Upcycle it Design Challenge. Project updates were again a little light this week in the Safe and Sound challenge, while the participants in the UpCycle It challenge continued with another solid week of updates across several projects. We have a lot to cover, so let's just jump right into it.

 

Safe & Sound Design Challenge

 

Featured as the first design challenge of 2017, the Safe & Sound Wearables challenge tasks its participants to conceive and build a 'safe and sound’ wearable that protects a person from personal and environmental risks, or monitors personal health or protects personal property from theft.

 

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Texas-Instruments-logo-design.png                        DJI_Innovations_logo.svg.png

 

On February 14th 2017 Element14 announced the list of the official 15 challengers picked to participate in the challenge, and those 15 challengers received a kit of components to use in their design which was sponsored by Texas Instruments. Each kit contains the following items:

 

Participation in this challenge is not limited to the sponsored challengers however. Anyone can enter, and all they have to do is Design with TI - integrating Texas Instruments’ latest microcontroller (MSP-EXP432P401R) MSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPadMSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPad into a wearable that is Safe & Sound.

 

 

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, April 30 - May 6, we have had a total of four updates posted across four  individual projects. With such few project updates this week, I am going to highlight both projects that received updates. Before we get to that, let's take a quick look at which projects were updated in the past seven days.

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

    • Invisible Hazardous Environmental Factors Monitoring System  - blog 14

 

 

In his first of two updates this week, Douglas Wong (dougw posted a demo video of three of the wearables that are part of his project. Doug says that “the concept is to mount all these devices on my forearm where the displays can easily be viewed and the controls can be easily accessed. This arrangement keeps both hands free for other tasks and eliminates the need to carry a tool box and set it down when taking readings... “The two flip-up modules have five 3D printed pieces each, plus a stretchy strap and some fasteners. The meters have some foam rubber in the caps so that when they are cinched down, everything remains snug with no rattling. The meter caps are held down with wire-ties, which minimizes the complexity and size of the 3D cases, while providing a very secure, snug fit. (obviously designed by an electronics guy) The Wi-Fi enabled gas sensor display uses seven 3D printed parts – covered in an earlier blog. Considering these modules are first prototypes, I am very happy they work so well,” he continued.

 

 

    • Hearing Guard System #10: Creating Graphics

 

 

With the 430BOOST-SHARP96 LCD430BOOST-SHARP96 LCD booster up and running, Jon set out to create some graphics that will eventually display the data that his sensors collect. In his tenth update, Jon details how he used the MSP430 Image Reformer Tool which is found in the MSP GRLIB Graphics Library to create these custom graphics. “The code produced from this tool is compatible with the MSP430 and MSP432 line of Launchpads and devices and the Grlib calls from TI,” he said. “As an example, I downloaded the Element14 Safe & Sound log, and using MS Paint, I made some minor changes and then created a .bmp. file to be used with Image Reformer.” Head over to the link above for the tutorial, sample code, and more!

 

 

Upcycle It Design Challenge

 

About The Challenge

 

Featured as the second design challenge of 2017, the Upcycle It design challenge tasks its participants to upcycle an obsolete item, computer, piece of electronic equipment or appliance and make a cool new electronics project built around the Intel® Edison Kit for Arduino.

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Challengers will build their projects using an official assortment of parts from Arduino, Intel, and Element14. Each kit contains the following items:

 

The Upcycle it Design Challenge features 15 official challengers that received a Challenger Kit for FREE, but thereafter anyone can join the Challenge simply by posting in the Upcycle it space (tagging their blogs 'upcycle it') to be in with a chance to win prizes. Anyone completing a project by the June 4th deadline and posting at least 10 times on the Community detailing their project build will be in the running to win some awesome prizes, including a Keithley DMM7510 Digital MultimeterKeithley DMM7510 Digital Multimeter worth almost $4,000.

 

*The official Challengers must build their project in accordance with the challenge's terms and conditions. All projects must include the Intel® Edison.

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, April 6 - May, we have had a total of ten updates posted across nine projects. With so many projects this week I will be highlighting two that I found helpful, educational, or just interesting in general. Before we get to this week’s highlighted post,let's take a quick look at which projects were updated in the past seven days.

Project: Upcycled Nixie Display - by Gerrit Polder (gpolder)

Project: Embedded Web SDR client on Analog Radio Receiver - by Konstantinos Konstas (konstantinoskonstas)

Project: Funeka - by Sakthivigneshwar R (sakthi.1260)

Project: WiFi Connected Smoke Detector - by Sergey Vlasov (vlasov01)

Project: PDU Upcycle for Automation by Jason Wier (jasonwier92)

Project: Upcycled Clock - by Carmelito Andrade (carmelito)

Project: UpCycle R2I - by John Kutzschebauch (jkutzsch)

Project: Interactive Race Car Driver - by Andy Clark (Workshopshed)

Project: Washing Machine Hydroponic Grower - by Fernando Hila (nandohila)

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

    • Washing Machine Hydroponic Grower - #5 Circuit Design

 

RGS+Sketch_bb.jpg

 

With the bulk of the more complicated portions of the project complete, Fernando Hila (nandohila) used the fifth update to his project to discuss the circuit that will be used to control his hydroponic washing machine. The system’s main component is the Intel Edison which controls the pumping system, lighting system, and takes readings from several sensors. Fernando says that this early system is designed to be simple and easy to implement, and he plans on expanding it in the future for more in-depth control features. Head over to the link above for the full rundown of the system and each of its components.

 

 

    • Embedded Web SDR client on Analog Radio Receiver #6: Changing the Display

 

2017-05-09 16_01_23-[Upcycle it Design Challenge] Embedded Web SDR ... _ element14 _ Upcycle It.png

 

After receiving some helpful advice from a fellow challenger, Konstantinos Konstas (konstantinoskonstas) spent some time working out how to control the Nokia 5110 LCD using Javascrip and MRAA. Unfortunately, it appears that he was unsuccessful and began looking for other screen options such as the display that came with the Grove kit, or an OLED board from Sparkfun. In the end, Konstantinos chose the Sparkfun OLED and has been working on getting it set up. Check out the link above for more information, and if you think you can help getting the LCDs to work with Node.JS, please leave a comment or message Konstantinos.

 

That is going to wrap up things for this week. Remember to check back next week for another Design Challenge Weekly Summary post. Until then head over to the official Safe & Sound Wearables Challenge Page, as well as the Upcycle It Challenge’s landing page fore more Design Challenge content! As always, remember to hack the world and make awesome!

DCWklyGnrcHdr.png

 

Welcome to another installment in the Design Challenge Weekly Summary series here at Element14! It’s week eleven of the Safe and Sound Wearables Design Challenge and this week also marks the seventh week of the Upcycle It Design Challenge. Project updates were a little on the light side this week in the Safe and Sound challenge, while the participants in the UpCycle It challenge produced a stellar thirteen updates across several projects. Additionally, Element14 announced that it has extended the deadline for project submissions for the Safe and Sound challenge to 9AM (GMT) on 26th June 2017. So as you can tell, a lot has happened in the past week, so let's just jump right into it.

 

 

Safe & Sound Design Challenge

 

Featured as the first design challenge of 2017, the Safe & Sound Wearables challenge tasks its participants to conceive and build a 'safe and sound’ wearable that protects a person from personal and environmental risks, or monitors personal health or protects personal property from theft.

 

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Texas-Instruments-logo-design.png                        DJI_Innovations_logo.svg.png

 

On February 14th 2017 Element14 announced the list of the official 15 challengers picked to participate in the challenge, and those 15 challengers received a kit of components to use in their design which was sponsored by Texas Instruments. Each kit contains the following items:

 

Participation in this challenge is not limited to the sponsored challengers however. Anyone can enter, and all they have to do is Design with TI - integrating Texas Instruments’ latest microcontroller (MSP-EXP432P401R) MSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPadMSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPad into a wearable that is Safe & Sound.

 

 

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, April 23 - April 29, we have had a total of two updates posted across two individual projects. With such few project updates this week, I am going to highlight both projects that received updates. Before we get to that, let's take a quick look at which projects were updated in the past seven days. 

 

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

    • Winter/Cold Weather Survival Suit Blog#9

 

 

This week Dale Winhold (dwinhold) fills our first spot with his work on waterproofing the electronics of project Winter Survival Suit. In this update, Dale attempted to waterproof an Arduino using an acrylic-based conformal coating spray. For those who are unfamiliar, a conformal coating is a plastic, rubber, or silicone based coating that can be brushed, sprayed, or applied to an electronic board by a dipping method, and once cured, will add a water-tight layer to the board that in theory should prevent electrical shorts if the board comes in contact with any moisture. Find out if the conformal coating was a success, and if the Arduino survived by watching the final video at the link above!

 

 

    • T-Shirt for Monitoring Elderly and Physically Challenged Patients #8 : Sugar, Spice and Everything Nice....

 

1.jpeg

 

Sakthivigneshwar R (sakthi.1260) is back for his third feature in as many weeks with his project, T-Shirt for Monitoring Elderly and Physically Challenged Patients. This week he began the assembly of the T-Shirt prototype by beginning to adding the sensors to the T-shirt, and making modifications to the pulse sensor. “I've made a change with the pulse sensor, I'm currently using a one based on MAX30100MAX30100, though its an obsolete product I found it to be simple and also capable of giving SpO2 Level too,” he said. Head over to the link above for the full rundown, and to see how the t-shirt turned out.

 

 

Upcycle It Design Challenge

 

About The Challenge

 

Featured as the second design challenge of 2017, the Upcycle It design challenge tasks its participants to upcycle an obsolete item, computer, piece of electronic equipment or appliance and make a cool new electronics project built around the Intel® Edison Kit for Arduino.

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Challengers will build their projects using an official assortment of parts from Arduino, Intel, and Element14. Each kit contains the following items:

 

The Upcycle it Design Challenge features 15 official challengers that received a Challenger Kit for FREE, but thereafter anyone can join the Challenge simply by posting in the Upcycle it space (tagging their blogs 'upcycle it') to be in with a chance to win prizes. Anyone completing a project by the June 4th deadline and posting at least 10 times on the Community detailing their project build will be in the running to win some awesome prizes, including a Keithley  DMM7510 Digital MultimeterKeithley  DMM7510 Digital Multimeter worth almost $4,000.

 

*The official Challengers must build their project in accordance with the challenge's terms and conditions. All projects must include the Intel® Edison.

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, April 23 - April 29, we have had a total of sixteen updates posted across ten projects. With so many projects this week I will be highlighting three that I found helpful, educational, or just interesting in general. Before we get to this week’s highlighted post,let's take a quick look at which projects were updated in the past seven days. 

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

    • Interactive Race Car Driver - Furby Hacking

 

minor_Furby_anatomy_HQ.png

Image Credit: Kelly Heaton

 

Furby’s are one of the coolest and creepiest consumer toys that has been released in the last two decades, and Andy Clark (Workshopshed) has shared his autopsy of one of the creepy little mechatronic creatures in his latest update to project Interactive Race Car Driver. If any of the current, or future challengers are wondering how to structure their project, Andy has done an excellent job with this project. His post are informative, and filled with information, as well as research sources, something that I absolutely love seeing! I must say though, I am a little envious of Andy, as I would love to get my hands on one of these little guys to hack on a bit. Before losing my home to a fire in 2012, I had been collecting Furby’s with the intent of hacking them to small X-Mod RC Cars and trying to make them swarm when near each other. Unfortunately that project died with the rest of my lab in the fire. I may return to it someday still though. Head over to the link above for Andy’s full autopsy of a Furby!

 

 

    • Reading out the weather using eSpeak

 

IMG_20170429_165335.jpg

 

If you follow my YouTube channel, you know that I love adding voice feedback and speech recognition to my projects, and this week, Carmelito Andrade (carmelito) has done the same to project Upcycled Clock. "As part of this blog post, we am going to set up eSpeak on the Intel Edison and have it read out today's weather condition via a speaker connected to the USB port of Edison Arduino breakout,” he said. “eSpeak is a compact open source software speech synthesizer for English and other languages, for Linux and Windows and it runs perfectly on Yacto linux.” The end result turned out well, and I recommend heading to the update at the link above to watch the demo video that Carmelito posted.

 

 

    • Nixie Display #7 - Interface PCBs

 

IMG_2740.JPG

 

My final project update highlight for this week comes from Gerrit Polder’s (gpolder) project, Nixie Display. With the arrival of his custom PCB’s Gerrit got started with the assembly process, and finished up with a teaser photo of the board installed into his project. Follow along at the first link above to check out the full build, and more information on the PCBs. Gerrit has offered to share a few boards to another challenger if they have a need for them as well.

 

 

That is going to wrap up things for this week. Remember to check back next week for another Design Challenge Weekly Summary post. Until then head over to the official Safe & Sound Wearables Challenge Page, as well as the Upcycle It Challenge’s landing page fore more Design Challenge content! As always, remember to hack the world and make awesome!

DCWklyGnrcHdr.png

Welcome to another installment in the Design Challenge Weekly Summary series here at Element14! It’s week ten of the Safe and Sound Wearables Design Challenge and this week also marks the sixth week of the Upcycle it Design Challenge. Both challenges have seen several project updates over the last week, which means we have a lot to cover, so let's just jump into it!

 

 

Safe & Sound Design Challenge

 

Featured as the first design challenge of 2017, the Safe & Sound Wearables challenge tasks its participants to conceive and build a 'safe and sound’ wearable that protects a person from personal and environmental risks, or monitors personal health or protects personal property from theft.

 

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Texas-Instruments-logo-design.png                        DJI_Innovations_logo.svg.png

 

On February 14th 2017 Element14 announced the list of the official 15 challengers picked to participate in the challenge, and those 15 challengers received a kit of components to use in their design which was sponsored by Texas Instruments. Each kit contains the following items:

 

Participation in this challenge is not limited to the sponsored challengers however. Anyone can enter, and all they have to do is Design with TI - integrating Texas Instruments’ latest microcontroller (MSP-EXP432P401R) MSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPadMSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPad into a wearable that is Safe & Sound.

 

 

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, April 16 - April 22, we have had a total of six updates posted across six individual projects. As with all of my weekly summary post, I will select a three of my favorite updates from the week and highlight them briefly below, but first let's take a quick look at what projects were updated in the past seven days.

 

Project: Hearing Guard System - by Jon Morss (jomoenginer)

Project: T-Shirt for Monitoring Elderly and Physically Challenged Patients - by Sakthivigneshwar R (sakthi.1260)

Project: Trackable Safety Helmet for Miners - by Mehmet Bozdal (mbozdal)

Project: Safety Jacket for the Tolling Industry - by Inderpreet Singh (ipv1)

Project: Flooding early-warning Alarm Pack - by Feng Yao (fyaocn)

Project: Winter Survival Suit Post - by Dale Winhold (dwinhold)

 

 

This Week’s Top Updates

Safety Jacket for the Tolling Industry #9: Keeping the Launchpads Safe

 

 

Inderpreet Singh (ipv1) takes our first spot this week with his ninth update to project Safety Jacket For The Trolling Industry. In this installment he showcases a simple 3D Printed case that he designed to fit the TI Launchpad. The case is designed to add a layer of protection to the Launchpad, and to keep water and other liquids from entering through the bottom, while recessed side buttons allow for ease of access while keeping solids out. Inderpreet included link to the .STL files in the event that one of the project's followers would like to print their own case.

 

 

T-Shirt for Monitoring Elderly and Physically Challenged Patients #7 : Its Dark and I'm Falling...

 

Optical.jpg

 

Sakthivigneshwar R (sakthi.1260) is back this week with his T-Shirt for Monitoring Elderly and Physically Challenged Patients with his progress on the IMU and light sensing portions of the project. However, he is experiencing issues with the Sensors booster pack BMI160 and Energia, so for the time being he is using the MPU6050 instead. Head over to the link above to see his preliminary results!

 

 

Hearing Guard System #9: TI-RTOS Enable Button HWI Part II - Debouncin'

 

 

Our last featured update from the Safe and Sound Wearables challenge for this week is the ninth update to project Hearing Guard System. This week Jon Morss (jomoenginer)showed us an easy way to add a mechanism to reduce the debounce occurrences when a Button is pressed on the MSP432. Jon walks us through the code needed to help filter out button bounces using code step by step. If you are unfamiliar with what “bounce” is and why you need to “debounce” buttons when interfacing them with microcontrollers, this post will help clarify things a little, so head over to the link above for more info!

 

 

Upcycle It Design Challenge

 

About The Challenge

 

Featured as the second design challenge of 2017, the Upcycle It design challenge tasks its participants to upcycle an obsolete item, computer, piece of electronic equipment or appliance and make a cool new electronics project built around the Intel® Edison Kit for Arduino.

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Challengers will build their projects using an official assortment of parts from Arduino, Intel, and Element14. Each kit contains the following items:

 

The Upcycle it Design Challenge features 15 official challengers that received a Challenger Kit for FREE, but thereafter anyone can join the Challenge simply by posting in the Upcycle it space (tagging their blogs 'upcycle it') to be in with a chance to win prizes. Anyone completing a project by the June 4th deadline and posting at least 10 times on the Community detailing their project build will be in the running to win some awesome prizes, including a Keithley  DMM7510 Digital MultimeterKeithley  DMM7510 Digital Multimeter worth almost $4,000.

 

*The official Challengers must build their project in accordance with the challenge's terms and conditions. All projects must include the Intel® Edison.

 

 

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, April 16 - April 22, we have had a total of ten updates posted across ten projects. With so many projects this week I will be highlighting three that I found helpful, educational, or just interesting in general. Before we get to this week’s highlighted post,let's take a quick look at which projects were updated in the past seven days.

 

 

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

Sockets In Sockets For My Sockets

 

NodeRed1.png

 

Jason Wier’s (jasonwier92) fourth update to project, PDU Upcycle for Automation holds the top seat this week in the Intel Upcycle It Challenge, and rightfully so. In this weeks update, Jason sets out to force himself to use NodeRed by writing a module that would serve as the gobetween for the various software components of his project. The post is full of useful information, and lots of source code, so head over and check it out!

 

 

WiFi Connected Smoke Detector #5: Monitor The Monitor

 

cronitor-integration.JPG

 

One question that comes to mind when designing a system that could potentially save lives is what happens when the system, or components thereof fail? To tackle this question, Sergey Vlasov (vlasov01) decided to utilize the Cronitor Service in conjunction with a heartbeat to check for internal processing errors, and then send out a message to alert the end user of the system’s failure. This alert will come via a message in Sergey’s custom Slack channel notifying the user that there is an issue. If the heartbeat resumes, another message will be sent notifying the user that things are working again. Check out the full update for more info!

 

 

Hermes 3000 - Post #3

 

test_circuit_in-use.jpg

 

This week I saved one of the best for last, and while every update we have seen from both challenges over the last seven days has been impressive, Joey Brock’s (jofas) third update to Hermes 3000 takes the cake for what had to have been a very high frustration factor. Continuing on from his last update where he attached 44 wires to each of the keys on his typewriter, Joey wired each of those leads into a breadboard filled with LED circuits. The theory here is that each LED will illuminate when its specific key is pressed. Source code and a more thorough explanation of what's going on can be found at the first link above.

 

 

That is going to wrap up things for this week. Remember to check back next week for another Design Challenge Weekly Summary post. Until then head over to the official Safe & Sound Wearables Challenge Page, as well as the Upcycle It Challenge’s landing page fore more Design Challenge content! As always, remember to hack the world and make awesome!

DCWklyGnrcHdr.png

 

Welcome to another installment in the Design Challenge Weekly Summary series here at Element14! It’s week nine of the Safe and Sound Wearables Design Challenge and this week also marks the fifth week of the Upcycle it Design Challenge. Both challenges have seen a lot of project updates over the last week, which means we have a lot to cover, so let's just jump into it!

 

 

Safe & Sound Design Challenge

 

Featured as the first design challenge of 2017, the Safe & Sound Wearables challenge tasks its participants to conceive and build a 'safe and sound’ wearable that protects a person from personal and environmental risks, or monitors personal health or protects personal property from theft.

 

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Texas-Instruments-logo-design.png                        DJI_Innovations_logo.svg.png

 

On February 14th 2017 Element14 announced the list of the official 15 challengers picked to participate in the challenge, and those 15 challengers received a kit of components to use in their design which was sponsored by Texas Instruments. Each kit contains the following items:

 

Participation in this challenge is not limited to the sponsored challengers however. Anyone can enter, and all they have to do is Design with TI - integrating Texas Instruments’ latest microcontroller (MSP-EXP432P401R) MSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPadMSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPad into a wearable that is Safe & Sound.

 

 

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, April 9 - April 15, we have had a total of eleven updates posted across nine projects. As with all of my weekly summary post, Since only four projects were updated, I will select a two of my favorite updates from the week and highlight them briefly below, but first let's take a quick look at what projects were updated in the past seven days.

 

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

 

E14-CLEWE Blog #7

 

SUNP0083b.jpg

 

After losing access to the PC that he worked hard to get set up for his project, E14-CLEWE, John Kutzschebauch (jkutzsch) has managed to recover, and has moved forward and is now experimenting to find the best way to interface different portions of his project. More specifically, the Ultimate GPS Data Logger shield,TI MCU, BoostXL Sensors, LCD Booster and Energia. Unfortunately, John has uncovered some issues that he will need to overcome. Head over to the link above for the full scoop!

 

 

Invisible Hazardous Environmental Factors Monitoring System MQTT Subscriber & Publisher - blog 12

 

MQTT_IHEF.jpg

 

Project Invisible Hazardous Environmental Factors Monitoring System took a major leap forward this week with the addition of a second WiFi Booster pack that Douglas Wong (dougw) purchased from Texas Instruments to serve as an MQTT client subscribing to the IHEF data being published by his sensor platform being served from his custom sensor booster pack. As demonstrated in the video attached to his update, he shows us how he is using the boards to relay data using MQTT, and as a bonus, he has included the subscriber program that he wrote for this demo. Check out the video at the link above.

 

 

T-Shirt for Monitoring Elderly and Physically Challenged Patients #6 : Breathe and Heat

 

1.jpg

 

My last featured project update for this week might be one of the most impressive concepts I have seen in any of the design challenges that I have followed over the years. In his sixth update to project T-Shirt for Monitoring Elderly and Physically Challenged Patients, Sakthivigneshwar R (sakthi.1260) uses a conductive elastic cord to devise an ingenious way to detect if a patient is breathing. The concept did work, but the resulting data was very noisy, and he has asked the community if they have any ideas as to how he could filter out much of that noise. Head over to the link above to check it out, and if you have any ideas, please get in touch with him.

 

 

 

 

Upcycle It Design Challenge

 

 

About The Challenge

 

Featured as the second design challenge of 2017, the Upcycle It design challenge tasks its participants to upcycle an obsolete item, computer, piece of electronic equipment or appliance and make a cool new electronics project built around the Intel® Edison Kit for Arduino.

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Challengers will build their projects using an official assortment of parts from Arduino, Intel, and Element14. Each kit contains the following items:

 

 

The Upcycle it Design Challenge features 15 official challengers that received a Challenger Kit for FREE, but thereafter anyone can join the Challenge simply by posting in the Upcycle it space (tagging their blogs 'upcycle it') to be in with a chance to win prizes. Anyone completing a project by the June 4th deadline and posting at least 10 times on the Community detailing their project build will be in the running to win some awesome prizes, including a Keithley  DMM7510 Digital MultimeterKeithley  DMM7510 Digital Multimeter worth almost $4,000.

 

*The official Challengers must build their project in accordance with the challenge's terms and conditions. All projects must include the Intel® Edison.

 

 

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, April 9 - April 15, we have had a total of twelve updates posted across twelve projects. With so many projects this week I will be highlighting three that I found helpful, educational, or just interesting in general. Before we get to this week’s highlighted post,let's take a quick look at which projects were updated in the past seven days.

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

 

Washing Machine Hydroponic Grower - #3 Preparation II

 

IMG_20170408_181537639.jpg

 

Our first featured project update this week for the Upcycle It challenge comes from project Washing Machine Hydroponic Grower by Fernando Hila (nandohila). After discovering that the washing machine’s motor operates at a set RPM, he scavenged a stepper motor from an old printer to use as the drive motor for the project instead. Additionally, Fernando set to work removing the front of the washing machine to give the project a more industrial look, and that is exactly why I chose this post to be first this week. I mean seriously, when do you ever get to see someone hacking apart a home appliance with a hacksaw here at element14. Check out more photos of the carnage (I mean that in a good way) at the link above.

 

 

Embedded Web SDR client on Analog Radio Receiver #3: Meeting with Edison

 

edison1_bb.png

 

Project Embedded Web SDR client on Analog Radio Receiver from Konstantinos Konstas (konstantinoskonstas is the focus of my second featured post this week, and got to work after receiving his Intel Edison board. Deciding to ditch the version of the Arduino IDE that he had been using in favor of the latest version which is compatible with Intel Edison. As he mentions, this could cause issues as all of his code was written in the 1.6.5 version of the IDE. He also talks about setting up  Eclipse to test the Intel Edison SDK as well as reporting on some issues that have arose with the Nokia 5110 LCD display. Head over to the link above to read the full post, and to see the example code he originally wrote for LCD display.

 

 

Upcycled Clock - 3D printing parts to hold buttons, pot, and LCD

 

IMG_3662.jpg

 

My final featured update this week is one that I am sure everyone knew I would like. While waiting on a package full of goodies to arrive, Carmelito Andrade (carmelito) got to work on project Upcycled Clock by 3D printing some mock up panels in PLA to test his designs fit before printing the final versions in a wood-based 3D printing filament. These panels serve as the mounting locations for the clocks new electronics, and as you can tell from the image above, the fit is very nice! I can’t wait to see how this turns out once the “wood” panels are in place and finished with stain! Check out the slideshow Carmelito put together to show how the process went at the link above!

 

 

That is going to wrap up things for this week. Remember to check back next week for another Design Challenge Weekly Summary post. Until then head over to the official Safe & Sound Wearables Challenge Page, as well as the Upcycle It Challenge’s landing page fore more Design Challenge content! As always, remember to hack the world and make awesome!

DCWklyGnrcHdr.png

 

Welcome to another installment in the Design Challenge Weekly Summary series here at Element14! It’s week eight of the Safe and Sound Wearables Design Challenge which puts us just over half way through. Additionally, we are just wrapping up the fourth week of the Upcycle It Design Challenge which means we have a lot to cover, so let's just jump into it!

 

 

Safe & Sound Design Challenge

 

Featured as the first design challenge of 2017, the Safe & Sound Wearables challenge tasks its participants to conceive and build a 'safe and sound’ wearable that protects a person from personal and environmental risks, or monitors personal health or protects personal property from theft.

 

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Texas-Instruments-logo-design.png                        DJI_Innovations_logo.svg.png

 

On February 14th 2017 Element14 announced the list of the official 15 challengers picked to participate in the challenge, and those 15 challengers received a kit of components to use in their design which was sponsored by Texas Instruments. Each kit contains the following items:

 

Participation in this challenge is not limited to the sponsored challengers however. Anyone can enter, and all they have to do is Design with TI - integrating Texas Instruments’ latest microcontroller (MSP-EXP432P401R) MSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPadMSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPad into a wearable that is Safe & Sound.

 

 

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, April 2 - April 8, we have had a total of five updates posted across four projects. As with all of my weekly summary post, Since only four projects were updated, I will select a two of my favorite updates from the week and highlight them briefly below, but first let's take a quick look at what projects were updated in the past seven days.

 

Project: Hearing Guard System - by Jon Morss (jomoenginer)

Project: Winter Survival Suit Post - by Dale Winhold (dwinhold)

Project: Flooding early-warning Alarm Pack by Feng Yao (fyaocn)

Project: Invisible Hazardous Environmental Factors Monitoring System - by Douglas Wong (dougw)

 

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

Hearing Guard System #7 CCS and TI-RTOS with Class code

 

2017-04-11 06_09_10-Start.png

 

Our first featured update this week is once again from project Hearing Guard System by Jon Morss (jomoenginer). After teaching us how to set up Code Composer Studio to support C++11 in TI-RTOS, Jon moved on to writing a few code examples to help us better understand how to use C++ Classes in a TI-RTOS project. For readers who are not very familiar with TI-RTOS and CCS, this post is definitely a must read, and is worthy of a bookmark for future reference. As many of you know, I love post like this that are educational and sample code rich. Check out the full post at the link above.

 

 

Flood early-warning Alarm Pack #4: Understanding BQ25570 EVM board

 

%E6%8D%95%E8%8E%B7.JPG

 

Project Flood early-warning Alarm Pack by Feng Yao (fyaocn once again claims the second featured update of the week. This we were provided with a very informative post that detailed the features of the BQ25570 EVM boardBQ25570 EVM board. “The bq25570 device is specifically designed to efficiently extract microwatts (µW) to milliwatts (mW) of power generated from a variety of high output impedance DC sources like photovoltaic (solar) or thermal electric generators (TEG) without collapsing those sources.The battery management features ensure that a rechargeable battery is not overcharged by this extracted power, with voltage boosted, or depleted beyond safe limits by a system load,” he said. “In addition to the highly efficient boosting charger, the bq25570 integrates a highly efficient, nano- power buck converter for providing a second power rail to systems such as wireless sensor networks (WSN) which have stringent power and operational demands.”

 

 

Upcycle It Design Challenge

 

 

About The Challenge

 

Featured as the second design challenge of 2017, the Upcycle It design challenge tasks its participants to upcycle an obsolete item, computer, piece of electronic equipment or appliance and make a cool new electronics project built around the Intel® Edison Kit for Arduino.

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Challengers will build their projects using an official assortment of parts from Arduino, Intel, and Element14. Each kit contains the following items:

 

 

The Upcycle it Design Challenge features 15 official challengers that received a Challenger Kit for FREE, but thereafter anyone can join the Challenge simply by posting in the Upcycle it space (tagging their blogs 'upcycle it') to be in with a chance to win prizes. Anyone completing a project by the June 4th deadline and posting at least 10 times on the Community detailing their project build will be in the running to win some awesome prizes, including a Keithley  DMM7510 Digital MultimeterKeithley  DMM7510 Digital Multimeter worth almost $4,000.

 

*The official Challengers must build their project in accordance with the challenge's terms and conditions. All projects must include the Intel® Edison.

 

 

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, April 2 - April 8, we have had a total of twelve updates posted across ten projects. With so many projects this week I will be highlighting three that I found helpful, educational, or just interesting in general. Before we get to this week’s highlighted post,let's take a quick look at which projects were updated in the past seven days.

 

 

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

UpCycle It - R2I - #3 - The Kit

 

pastedImage_7.png

 

My first featured update for the Upcycle it challenge features none other than John Kutzschebauch (jkutzsch) and his project, UpCycle R2I. This is one of those projects that has stolen my heart and attention as it is very similar to something I have been planning to build for some time now. The idea of recycling old refrigerators into egg incubators is for lack of a better word, brilliant. As a hobby farmer myself, the idea of reusing an old appliance to help expand my flock of chickens is very interesting to me, and I will definitely be keeping a close eye on this project. Click the link above to check out this project from the beginning.

 

 

Interactive Race Car Driver - Edison

 

Edison.jpg

 

Design Challenge veteran Andy Clark (Workshopshed) claims the number two spot this week with his project, Interactive Race Car Driver. In the project’s fifth update, Andy walks us through the process of setting up the Intel Edison board, installing a few prerequisite programs, and running a quick test with MRAA. This post caught my eye due to the list of references that Andy has posted at the bottom of the update. This is something I feel that we all should do more often. Having a list of resources where we gathered our info from could prove invaluable to someone else reading our post, and wanting to further understand why we did specific things in the code, hardware, or design aesthetics. Hit up the link above for more.

 

 

Nixie Display #2 - Investigations

 

IMG_2643.jpg

 

Out final featured update this week comes from Gerrit Polder’s (gpolder) project, Upcycled Nixie Display. After showing us how he measured the power rating of the Nixie tubes used in the project, Gerrit briefly educates us on how the numbers in each tube are indexed, and what is needed to drive the tubes. Nixie tubes are something I have always wanted to work with in a project, so I will be paying close attention to this one for sure. Follow along as well by visiting the link above.

 

 

That is going to wrap up things for this week. Remember to check back next week for another Design Challenge Weekly Summary post. Until then head over to the official Safe & Sound Wearables Challenge Page, as well as the Upcycle It Challenge’s landing page fore more Design Challenge content! As always, remember to hack the world and make awesome!

The UpcycleIt Design Challenge Challengers was announced on Mar 23rd.

 

During my challenges, I always found it useful to have a calendar of sorts as a gentle reminder.

 

Announced23-Mar
Closes 04-Jun
IntroBlog 1Blog 2Blog 3Blog 4Blog 5Blog 6Blog 7Blog 8Blog 9

Blog 10

Summary
23-Mar30-Mar06-Apr13-Apr20-Apr27-Apr04-May11-May18-May25-May01-Jun04-Jun

 

By my calculation we're now at week 3 (give or take a day depending on what time zone you're in).

 

CharlesGantt does a weekly overview of the Design Challenges   Design Challenge Weekly Summary: Week Ending April 1, 2017.

Due to storms and power loss, he had some issues, but no doubt will be in a better place this week to highlight the progress of the competitors in Upcycle It

 

It's a great stage to showcase your efforts every week, and it may get the judges attention which can only help you!

 

 

Progress

There have been some great blogs presented so far.

Some of these come from seasoned challengers, but others have provided very useful and informative blogs on their design.

 

As a Judge I have to be impartial, and my taste in fast cars means any monetary bribe is ... well just too expensive.

So I'm not going to single out any particular blogs.

 

I've also learnt that it's not over until the fat lady sings ... but then I've never been to an Opera and have no desire to go.

So while some might be slow off the mark, they can easily catch up and pass fellow challengers.

 

The journey to the finish line means that the challengers need to heed the Terms and Conditions, so a reminder here is appropriate as I'd like to see everyone in the running for the awesome prizes.

 

The T&C's state:

Post to the Competition Site blogs on the progress of their Project (Blogs) not less frequently than once per week during the Competition Period.

One or two weekly omissions are permissible as long as the total number of Blogs is at least 10.

 

The competition period is stated as  ... Competition Period: Challengers’ Announcement to Project Submission Close

 

Since the challenge only runs 11 weeks plus three days, there isn't a lot of room to miss many dates.

Any you do miss, will mean extra work in one of those weeks to make sure you post 10X.

 

 

Nothing to write

In my guide Design Challenge Blogs I gave an example of how to meet the blogging requirements that form part of the T&C's.

 

The first blog is easy, you put in an application which was chosen, and therefore your Introduction is already formulated and just needs a few tweaks and maybe a picture or two.

Many of the challengers did that within a day or two and the response was great, with ideas flowing between challengers and onlookers.

 

While the challengers wait for that knock on the door or package in the mailbox, you should have fleshed out the parts you need to concentrate on.

There should be some sort of plan about how you're going to implement your idea (i.e. the actual construction and hardware). You don't have to use all the parts in the Kit, just the mandatory component specified, which should help!

 

Your second posts were due on 6 April.

Again some challengers have done exactly that and spelt out how they will implement their designs, or the work they have done on the item they are Upcycling.

 

Sadly 30% are missing that blog, and it's now the start of week three of a program that lasts a little under 11 weeks.

A few people have already finshed their Intro and two blogs about the progress of their project ... well done.

 

 

No progress to write about

When undertaking these challenges, we all face issues where the software doesn't do what we thought, the parts haven't arrived, or we got sick.

All of these are part of the progress on the project.

 

It may not be progress in the right direction, but it is progress.

     Photo source https://momentswithmarsha.com/2015/07/22/serious-moments-dealing-with-disappointment/

 

Your blog about how xyz didn't work, may be answered by another challenger, or someone following the challenge, so don't be afraid to share throughout.

 

Some challengers have already found that others have made some great suggestions to either improve their design, or modify it to achieve what they expect, and with less work.

IMO anything that achieves the same output with less effort is a win.

 

The message here is that the weekly blogs can be very useful to help you progress your design.

The other challengers are not going to change track and copy it, so don't be afraid to share.

 

 

JUDGING

The T&Cs ( Upcycle it Design Challenge: Terms and Conditions  ) state this.

The same page suggests adding the tag "Upcycle it" to the blog

 

Judging Criteria: All of the following which will have equal weighting:

 Originality;

 Innovation;

 Technical merit;

 Meeting the goals and intentions of the Challenge as set forth in these Terms;

 Completeness and clarity of Blogs and supporting media describing the evolution and completion of the Project

 

Your idea may have the first two covered.

Some people may consider they should win a prize simply because their idea is original or innovative and therefore the content they provide is of little consequence.

 

Sadly, someone else may have the last two covered and therefore is in equal standing to be considered for a prize.

 

If you want to increase your profile to the judges, then good blogs are not just important, they are essential.

Have a look at past challenges to see what the difference is, and see if you can add content to make your blog standout.

 

 

Blog Criteria

The T&C's have a good explanation about what is required.

 

The sponsor has provided the goods in exchange for something.

For these challenges they want to see it exposed to Engineers and others that are interested in technology.

It's also a great way for them to see other uses, and any difficulties that you may have experienced.

 

element14 community provides that through the website and their social media channels.

 

The other aspect to this :

If you work for someone and are in charge of a project, the management (or the customer) will be expecting progress reports or updates on how it's going.

It could be the original specification, budget or timeline was impossible (who hasn't had those before), and these reports show that while the work is progressing, it will never meet the expected result.

They may be able to provide more resources to bring it back on track, or they note the 12hr days you're doing to help it, and you will stand out above your peers when the next promotion comes along.

 

So you should be considering these challenges as a practice for the real world.

 

 

Break It Down

Projects, large or small, can seem overwhelming when you look at the whole thing.

Breaking it down into smaller chunks, means you can concentrate on one aspect and then move onto another.

 

You need to be careful that you have the overall picture in mind when you arrange your resources.

It is better to order parts used in week 4 today, so they are waiting when you get to that aspect of the build.

 

I was once told that you need to have a plan.

The plan can change, but without a plan, you can't change it.

 

Some people might challenge that by saying they never have a plan, but the the reality is they do.

They may not write it down, but they do have one somewhere inside their head.

 

In my career I've seen some extremely complex, and IMO not entirely useful project workflows.

They seem to be generated just for the project manager to have a complicated looking timeline.

To add to the uselessness, the individual timeframes bore no relationship to the actual times required, and the whole thing seemed to be a box ticking exercise for bonus or progress payments.

 

For my challenges I had a piece of A4 paper with 10 or 12 subjects, and dates they were due.

It lived in plain view next to the mousemat.

Under each of the subjects I had some notes or single words that related to that part of the plan.

I ended up swapping a couple of subjects due to parts hold-ups, and I recall shifting some words from one subject to another as it fitted better. It doesn't need to be complicated.

 

These challenges have a very short timeframe (approx. 11 weeks), which means delays have a much greater impact.

Using your blogging plan means that should you have a delay in one area, you could skip to the next.

You may run across information that might suit further down, or the slight change in direction has an impact later.

 

The important part here is that while you need to break down a project and concentrate on that aspect, you need to always consider the impact on the overall project.

 

 

DNF

A DNF is "Did Not Finish" and I've seen it used in motor racing.

In that world you either cross the finish line or you don't, and the rules limit what sort of assistance is allowed.

 

          Photo source      Flip Schulke Photography » After running out of gas on the final lap, Jack Brabham pushes his car across the finish line…

 

 

The Design Challenges don't have a finish line as such, and the only way to achieve a DNF is to fail to meet the T&C's.

Under the judging criteria it doesn't say "Must work as designed".

 

Your initial design may not meet it's desired objective, but you've identified the problems, sorted out some solutions, and done just about everything you can to make it a possibility.

This is not an excuse for promising "world peace" in your application, and then saying you couldn't achieve it because of xyz.

It is an accurate reflection of the progress of your project, which due to various reasons was not fully working at the competition close date. That's OK!

 

So my advice is don't give up because it was not going as expected, see it through for the sponsors and more importantly your integrity.

The lesson you learn will be invaluable later, and other members will definitely learn from your efforts!...that's what Community is all about .

 

 

Mark

DCWklyGnrcHdr.png

Welcome to another installment in the Design Challenge Weekly Summary series here at Element14! It’s week seven of the Safe and Sound Wearables Design Challenge which puts us about half way through, and our challengers have been working hard with new updates to several projects. I apologize for the late posting, but bad weather here in SC has caused mass power outages, and unfortunately I have been suffering  through them. That is beside the point though as there have been a lot of good project updates over the last week, so let's just jump into it while I still have electricity!

 

Safe & Sound Design Challenge

 

Featured as the first design challenge of 2017, the Safe & Sound Wearables challenge tasks its participants to conceive and build a 'safe and sound’ wearable that protects a person from personal and environmental risks, or monitors personal health or protects personal property from theft.

 

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Texas-Instruments-logo-design.png                        DJI_Innovations_logo.svg.png

 

On February 14th 2017 Element14 announced the list of the official 15 challengers picked to participate in the challenge, and those 15 challengers received a kit of components to use in their design which was sponsored by Texas Instruments. Each kit contains the following items:

 

Participation in this challenge is not limited to the sponsored challengers however. Anyone can enter, and all they have to do is Design with TI - integrating Texas Instruments’ latest microcontroller (MSP-EXP432P401R) MSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPadMSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPad into a wearable that is Safe & Sound.

 

 

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, March 26 - April 1, we have had a total of eight updates posted across four projects. As with all of my weekly summary post, Since only four projects were updated, I will select a two of my favorite updates from the week and highlight them briefly below, but first let's take a quick look at what projects were updated in the past seven days. 

 

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

T-Shirt for Monitoring Elderly and Physically Challenged Patients #5 : Listening to Heart and Beat

 

Setup.jpeg

 

Last week brought us the fifth update of project T-Shirt for Monitoring Elderly and Physically Challenged Patients with Sakthivigneshwar R (sakthi.1260) showing off his success at creating a pulse sensor built from parts supplied in the official challenger kit. I wanted to feature this post because I found the results quite interesting, but I wanted to see the code that was used to achieve the end result. Unfortunately the code was not provided, nor was a schematic of how things were connected. I want to remind the challengers that sharing your project, and its various components such as source code and schematics is what makes these challenges so great.

 

 

Flood early-warning Alarm Pack #3: IDE Tools for Development

 

element1.JPG

 

My second and final featured post for this week is from project Flood early-warning Alarm Pack by Feng Yao (fyaocn). In its third update, Feng details why he chose Code Composer Studio 7.x and Energia1.6.10E18 as the development environments in which he will code the alarm pack. While much of the information provided was from sample code provided by TI, Feng says that the sample code provided by TI has helped him not only become more inspired, but has also helped him understand things better. This is the exact reason that I push so hard for our design challengers to release their source code. It not only helps inspire the project’s followers, but allows those at home to recreate the project themselves.

 

 

That is going to wrap up things for this week, and in the time it took me to write this, our electricity has went out three more times, but this time it is because crews are repairing damaged sections of our grid, not because of storms. Remember to check back next week for another Design Challenge Weekly Summary post. Until then head over to the official Safe & Sound Wearables Challenge Page, and as always, remember to hack the world and make awesome!

DCWklyGnrcHdr.png

Welcome to another installment in the Design Challenge Weekly Summary series here at Element14! It’s week five of the Safe and Sound Wearables Design Challenge. It looks like more of the missing kits are beginning to show up, so we should see more updates this coming week!

Safe & Sound Design Challenge

 

Featured as the first design challenge of 2017, the Safe & Sound Wearables challenge tasks its participants to conceive and build a 'safe and sound’ wearable that protects a person from personal and environmental risks, or monitors personal health or protects personal property from theft.

 

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Texas-Instruments-logo-design.png                        DJI_Innovations_logo.svg.png

 

On February 14th 2017 Element14 announced the list of the official 15 challengers picked to participate in the challenge, and those 15 challengers received a kit of components to use in their design which was sponsored by Texas Instruments. Each kit contains the following items:

 

Participation in this challenge is not limited to the sponsored challengers however. Anyone can enter, and all they have to do is Design with TI - integrating Texas Instruments’ latest microcontroller (MSP-EXP432P401R) MSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPadMSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPad into a wearable that is Safe & Sound.

 

 

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, March 19 - March 25, we have had a total of ten updates posted across nine projects. As with all of my weekly summary post, I will select a few of my favorite updates from the week and highlight them briefly below, but first let's take a quick look at what projects were updated in the past seven days. 

 

 

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

Smart Safety Glasses #4: Establishing a wireless link - Part 2

 

pastedImage_0.png

 

In project Smart Safety Glasses’ fourth update, Alex Kucherov (salexku) shows us how to configure the CC3100 WiFi booster packCC3100 WiFi booster pack as a client that will communicate with the server running on the ESP8266ESP8266. From setting up the hardware and installing the IDE each step is well detailed and includes code examples with explanations as well as the full sketch for those who want to follow along at home. Alex wraps the post up by showing us how to test if the sketch works, and communication with the ESP8266 is successful. 

 

 

Code Composer Studio Woes

 

2017-03-28 04_30_00-Safe and Sound Wearables- Code Composer Studio ... _ element14 _ Safe and Sound.png

 

Week six was not kind to Jon Morss (jomoenginer), and tossed a curve ball at project Hearing Guard System when Jon ran into a trifecta of speed bumps with Code Composer Studio. After recent updates, issues developed involving code importation using the TI Resource Explorer in version 7.0.0.x of the software. Another issue appeared when the .cfg file was left open in the CCS editor window, which caused the program to throw an error when the program is started again. Finally, another error appeared when Jon attempted to add CSS classes to his project. Unlike the other two issues he was able to solve this one by removing the  'iostream' and namespace entries in the file and adding a few likes of code to the header file.

 

 

Rider protection and vehicle safety gear for bikes #1 Introductory blog

 

2017-03-28 04_40_46-Safe & Sound -  Rider protection and vehicl... _ element14 _ Safe and Sound.png

 

In his first blog post ever, Priyanto Deb (priyantodeb) outlines his project and educates us on the growing problem of motorcycle and bicycle accidents in India. “I am from India, belonging to a developing country with such a high volume of bikes and scooters, we witness a lot of accidents and thefts of these vehicles which in general have low security options and even less rider protection systems in place, with other developing countries also facing such problems such as Vietnam and Thailand,” he said. To combat this problem, he will build a special lock system for the vehicles that will improve their safety and security, and will follow up with a second system that will protect the riders during their travels on the bikes and scooters.

 

 

That is going to wrap up things for this week, but check back next week for another Design Challenge Weekly Summary post, as well as my first Project Summary post of this challenge. Until then head over to the official Safe & Sound Wearables Challenge Page, and as always, remember to hack the world and make awesome!

DCWklyGnrcHdr.png

Welcome to another installment in the Design Challenge Weekly Summary series here at Element14! It’s week five of the Safe and Sound Wearables Design Challenge, and this week also marks the return of my project summary series. There have been a lot of good project updates over the last week, so let's just jump into it!


Safe & Sound Design Challenge

 

Featured as the first design challenge of 2017, the Safe & Sound Wearables challenge tasks its participants to conceive and build a 'safe and sound’ wearable that protects a person from personal and environmental risks, or monitors personal health or protects personal property from theft.

 

 

 

The Official Kit, and The Prizes

 

Texas-Instruments-logo-design.png                        DJI_Innovations_logo.svg.png

 

On February 14th 2017 Element14 announced the list of the official 15 challengers picked to participate in the challenge, and those 15 challengers received a kit of components to use in their design which was sponsored by Texas Instruments. Each kit contains the following items:

 

Participation in this challenge is not limited to the sponsored challengers however. Anyone can enter, and all they have to do is Design with TI - integrating Texas Instruments’ latest microcontroller (MSP-EXP432P401R) MSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPadMSP-EXP432P401R LaunchPad into a wearable that is Safe & Sound.

 

The Past Week In Review

 

In the past week, March 12 - March 18, we have had a total of nine updates posted across eight projects. As with all of my weekly summary post, I will select a few of my favorite updates from the week and highlight them briefly below, but first let's take a quick look at what projects were updated in the past seven days.

 

 

This Week’s Top Updates

 

Safety Jacket for the Tolling Industry #5: Writing your own protocol

 

2017-03-21 16_49_08-Safe & Sound - Safety Jacket for the Tollin... _ element14 _ Safe and Sound.png

 

As an engineer there will be times where you have to take matters into your own hands and write your own protocols to get the job done, and with more than a decade of experience Inderpreet Singh (ipv1) is doing just that in the fifth update to his project, Safety Jacket For The Tolling Industry. In this educational yet easy to read update, Inderpreet walks us through each step of the process he uses to create his own protocol stack. From the terminology, to the code, it’s all there. I’m positive that this post holds something inside for everyone from seasoned engineer to home hobbyist, so head over to the link above to check it out.

 

This post actually came at a good time for me as I am actually in the process of learning to write protocols myself, and this update really helped me wrap my head around things a bit more. That is what makes these design challenges so valuable to the community, and why I hold such a high regard for those who join the challenges and share their knowledge. Collaboration and the sharing of knowledge like this is the true driving force behind innovation, and is what makes the Element14 community so special!

 

 

Hearing Guard System #5: Audio Circuit - Part Deux

 

 

My next featured updated this week comes from Jon Morss (jomoenginer) and his project, Hearing Guard System’s fifth update. If you have been following this project, you will remember that Jon recently started work on the project’s audio circuitry. In part two we get our first glimpse of the code that will run on the MSP-EXP432P401RMSP-EXP432P401R to handle the audio task as well as controlling the 430BOOST-SHARP96430BOOST-SHARP96 LCD.

 

 

Telemetry System For Smart Clothes #2: The shirt

 

Wire.jpg

 

Alexander Molnar’s (amolnar) second update to his project, Telemetry System For Smart Clothes, earns the final spot in this week’s summary. It’s not a very large post, but I wanted to feature it because despite still not having received his sponsored kit, Alexander is continuing to push forward by working on the shirt that will hold all of his sensors. Over the course of the design challenge series we have seen many attempts to hide wiring inside of clothing, but I think that Alexander may have just set the new standard for the best way to embed wires inside of clothing. Using a unique weave pattern, he created little channels that will allow the wire to flex and move with the natural movement of the clothes when worn, a problem that has plagued wearables designers for years. Great job Alexander! Hit up the link above to check it out!

 

 

That is going to wrap up things for this week, but check back next week for another Design Challenge Weekly Summary post, as well as my first Project Summary post of this challenge. Until then head over to the official Safe & Sound Wearables Challenge Page, and as always, remember to hack the world and make awesome!