So this is my 18th and final blogpost for my music tech design challenge project, and for it I have created three new videos talking about and demoing the end result of the project:

  1. A specification overview video, outlining all the features of the synth as well as briefly discussing the overall development of it and how it works
  2. A complete walkthrough video, demoing in detail each control and parameter of the synthesiser
  3. A video on how the device can be used as a MIDI controller

 

I've also included the demo sound video that I posted a couple of weeks back, as that video is a great example of the range of sounds that the synth can produce, as well as some new higher-quality photos of the synth.

 

Specification Overview Video

 

This video briefly goes over the specifications and features of the synth from both a user and development point-of-view.

 

 

Complete Walkthrough Video

 

This video is an extension of the last video, and in detail talks about and demos each control and parameter of the vintage toy synth. I apologise that the video quality isn't great and that you can't quite make out all the text on the panel, however hopefully I explain in enough detail what I am doing as I go along for you to make sense of it. Also it was produced to demo how each control/parameter effects the sound, rather than how to create a great sounding patch, so please don't judge the sound capabilities of the synth based on the fairly average patches that I produce in this video.

 

 

Sound/Patch Demo Video

 

I first posted this video a couple of weeks back, however it is a perfect example of the types and range of sounds that you can create with the final state of the vintage toy synth, so I thought it would make sense to include it here as well. This video also demonstrates the use of the VTS Editor - a desktop/laptop application I developed for the synth for adding patch saving and loading capabilities to the instrument.

 

 

MIDI Controller Video

 

While the previous videos demonstrate the instruments primary function as a standalone synthesiser, this video shows how the device can be used as a MIDI controller. The video demos the synths MIDI capabilities with Logic Pro and Ableton Live, however the device could theoretically be used to control any external MIDI software or hardware.

 

 

Photos

 

Below are some high-quality photos of the final state of the vintage toy synthesiser.

 

vintage toy synth 1

vintage toy synth 2

vintage toy synth 3

vintage toy synth 4

vintage toy synth 5

vintag toy synth 6

vintage toy synth 7

 

 

Final Development Material

 

All the final code, circuit diagrams and design files for the synthesiser can be found in the projects Github repository.

 

Conclusion

 

I've spent the majority of my free time over the past 3 and half months working on this project, and I couldn't be happier with the result. My skills in both software and hardware development have dramatically improved thanks to this project, and even though it's been a lot of hard work and very stressful at times, it has overall been a very fun experience. I hope those of you who have been following the project have enjoyed what I've done, and please feel free to leave any questions below.

 

Thanks!