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Smarter Life

21 Posts authored by: ciorga Top Member
Here is the latest update on my work on the brainwaves appliance controller. Last update I showed how I designed a new prototype board, which probably will be the last prototype until I design the final product.   In the meantime the board came back from fabrication and I have soldered all the components.  Here is a picture of the assembled prototype board.       In my last blog post I also described a weird problem I encountered with Cypress PSoC Creator ...
Last update I discussed the problems I ran into when I combined the infrared remote control code learner with the brainwave appliance controller.  As a refresher, previously I built a brainwaves appliance controller in a PSoC5LP chip  part of a Schmartboard prototype board and an infrared remote control code learner in a Cypress CY8CKIT-001 evaluation kit.  While they both worked well separately, when I combined them in the same PSoC5LP chip I ran into some problems.  In my p ...
This is update number nine of my brainwaves appliance controller project.  To summarize this work, first I want to mention that I started this project as part of Element14’s PSoC4 Smarter Life Challenge.  After the challenge ended I continued to work on the project by first porting the design from Cypress PSoC4 to a PSoC5LP chip.  The PSoC5LP has more analog resources than PSoC4, which allows me to simplify the front end electrodes amplifier circuits.   In the firs ...
This is the fourth blog update after I started to build the infrared remote control code learner in a Cypress PSoC5LP chip.  I am happy to see it working now.  It was a quite difficult job, much harder than I expected.  In my previous three blog posts I showed how I built a circuit and algorithm that captures the infrared signal from a remote control and stores the raw symbols in an array.  Then the raw symbols are decoded and compressed/encoded into a format that can fit in ...
  This is the third blog update after I started to build the infrared remote control code learner (here are links to the previous posts: 1, 2, 3 ) .  I thought it would go faster, but it turned out to be a quite difficult task, which I am still working on.  So far, as I showed in my previous blog, I built a circuit and algorithm that captures the infrared signal from a remote control, decodes it, measures the infrared carrier frequency (which can have various values typically bet ...
In my previous two blog posts I showed how I started to build a “code learner" for infrared remote controls in a PSoC5LP chip.  This code learner captures the infrared signal from a remote control, decodes the signal, and compresses it in a format that can be stored in a nonvolatile memory location inside the PSoC5LP chip.  The stored code is then retrieved from memory and used to reconstruct the modulated signal, which is sent off-chip to drive an infrared transmitter LED.  ...
In my previous blog post  I showed how I started to build a “code learner" for infrared remote controls that I would then implement in my brainwaves appliance controller project.  This way users can “teach” the brainwaves appliance controller the specific codes needed to turn on/off their television sets, to change channels, and to turn the volume up and down.   The first step was to measure the infrared carrier frequency, which typically has values between ...
I thought building a “code learner" for infrared remote controls is an easy job; well, it is not.  I started by constructing a code learner function in my brainwave appliance controller project that I built using the PSoC5LP  as I described in my previous blog post.  That project uses a PSoC5LP on a Schmartboard, which is a small evaluation board very self-contained, comes with a boot loader application, and has almost all I/O pins routed to connectors.  I really like t ...
I have found a way to solve the technical issues described in my previous blog  and now my brainwaves appliance controller implemented in PSoC5LP works.   To get around the noise problem I implemented the front-end amplifier using a INA121 instrumentation amplifier as I am showing in the schematic below.  I set the gain to about 25 through a 2kOhm resistor made of R4 and R5 in series.  The center node is at the common mode voltage of the two inputs.  This common vol ...
In my previous update ( Smarter Life Challenge - Brainwaves based appliance controller - Update 9) I wanted to implement the brainwave appliance controller in a single chip using the PSoC5LP on the Cypress Pioneer kit. I got stuck because the operational amplifier dedicated input ports were not accessible on that board. Since then I got two other evaluation boards containing PSoC5LP chips: a Cypress CY8CKIT-001 PSoC evaluation kit and a Schmartboard PSoC module. Both these kits have operational ...
After Smarter Life Challenge ended I took a break and now I’m back working on my Brainwave Appliance Controller.  My plan is first to try to implement the project into a PSoC5LP chip and then to expand the project by adding two more electrodes one above the eyes and one below to sense vertical movements.  Cypress PSoC5LP has more analog front end resources and I think I might be able to eliminate the discrete amplifiers that I am using now in PSoC4 implementation and thus make th ...
So here I am at the end of the Smarter Life Challenge, and I am happy to say that I had a lot of fun and satisfaction along this time.  Starting from a "crazy" idea to control appliances by brainwaves, things became more and more realistic up to the point of building a prototype that worked.  As I showed in the last update videos I was able to turn on and off a television set, a cable box, and I was able to change channels by only moving my eyes.  It all happens from the brain dec ...
I'VE GOT IT TO WORK!!! I am so happy!!!  After two months of working every weekend, now I have a brainwaves appliance controller that works.  Here is a picture of how it looks like on my head and below it’s a more detailed picture of the project itself:   So there is my custom amplifier board plugged into J2 connector of the Pioneer PSoC4 kit and a battery pack connected to the USB port (that type of battery pack that provides 5V dc through a USB port).     I ...
Here I am with the 8th update on my smart life challenge project, and I would first want to thank everyone who commented or emailed me about my previous update messages.  Seeing that someone is out there watching my progress (and struggle with various issues) gives me a wonderful feeling and energy to work on this project.     This weekend I spent some time finalizing the front-end amplifier PCB design and I submitted it for fabrication. I have designed this PCB to be plugged int ...
First, thank you DAB and cy.gul for your comments on my last week's update.  It turned out that the Manchester encoder that I built last weekend is not used in the infrared protocol of my TV remote.  After more reading I actually found out that there are various other encoding standards used in home appliances (like TVs, Cable boxes, satellite receivers, audio equipment …).  So first thing I looked into was how to transform the Manchester encoder into a more universal encod ...