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Safe and Sound

15 Posts authored by: dwinhold

Hello everyone,

 

I have received the runner-up prize and I am so excited!! I can't wait to get out and give it a try. Below are pictures of my new toy.

DJI3.jpg

DJI2.jpg

DJI.jpg

 

I want to thank everyone involved with the Safe and Sound design challenge especially our great sponsors!!

 

Dale Winhold

 

p.s. I will upload video of the first flight

Safe and Sound – Winter Survival Suit

Summary – Blog #14 (Final post)

 

This has been a great challenge that I have enjoyed immensely.  Since the start to completion there have been many challenges and accomplishments. I have to say the biggest challenge was getting the temperature sensors to work and the biggest accomplishment was water proofing the electronics. The idea of the suit has been on my mind for years, basically every time I went outside in winter time. I always thought to myself, if there was only a way to bring a heating blanket, that’s always plugged in. When this challenge came along, with the kit that was supplied by Texas Instruments, I could finally make it a reality.

 

In this blog I am showing the completed suit and how it works. I will show the convenience and safety that it provides as well as why I won’t got out in winter without it. I will also do a comparison to similar items on the market.

 

Completed suit and how it works:

 

 

 

 

Comparison:

Here is a side by side comparison to the existing heated clothing on the market at this time.

 

Heated jacket comparison
Winter Survival SuitBoschDewaltMakita

Heat Settings

User set temperature

Computer regulated

High, Medium & LowHigh, Medium, Low & Pre-heat High, Medium & Low
Heat ZonesR Leg, L Leg, R Arm, L Arm, R & L TorsoL Chest, R Chest & Mid-backL Chest, R Chest, Mid-back & CollarL Chest, R Chest & Mid-back
Heat Runtime

Full time all zone heating 3.2 Hrs

6 Hours7.5 Hours6 Hours
Normal use heat as needed 8 - 20 Hours
Pockets2555
Water resistantYesYesYesYes
Voltage7.2V & 14.4V, Computer 5V12V12V / 20V18V
RechargeableYesYesYesYes
Weight4.9 Lbs3.5 Lbs5.4 Lbs3.8 Lbs
MaterialPolyesterPolyesterPolyester94% Polyester / 6% Spandex
WarrantyLong time1 Year1 Year

1 Year
 

 

 

 

 

 

Parts list and cost:

 

TI kit: The parts from the kit that I used were  MSP-EXP432P401RMSP-EXP432P401R and the  430BOOST-SHARP96430BOOST-SHARP96

                Total value: $33.50

 

Carbon Fiber: Ordered online from http://www.carbonheater.us/

                Total: $53.00

 

Sensors: I bought 8 temperature sensors (Twice) since I couldn’t get the first ones to work

                Total cost: $43.00

 

Wire: I bought very little wire since I had so much lying around

                Cost: $12.00

 

Batteries: The batteries and charger were fairly expensive. I am using ICR18650 batteries (8 required) and a 5V rechargeable USB battery to run the computer

                Cost: $102.24

 

Water proof spray: This was used to waterproof the electronics. The product was called “MG Chemicals Acrylic Lacquer Conformal Coating

                Cost: $23.20

 

Power relay module: This is used to switch the power on and off to the heating elements

                Cost: $13.99

 

Switches: These are used for user bypass in case of electronics failure.

                Cost: $29.94

 

Clothing: To make the suit itself I used a jogging suit

                Cost: $32.00

 

 

The total cost to make the suit: $342.87

 

 

 

Final thoughts:

 

After completing the suit, it works better then I had hoped. Unfortunately due to the extreme heat we are having I didn't try the suit on. I can't wait until winter to be using it every day, especially the -20 or colder weather. I want to thank everyone who has read my blogs, helped me with ideas and helped me through issues I encountered. I want to thank our great sponsors Texas Instruments and Element14.

 

Thank you everyone!!

 

Dale Winhold

So where did we leave off, oh yes, finish up the survival suit. In the past week I got a lot accomplished, below is my "to do" list of things to complete from Blog #11. The list has gotten short, the project is almost complete, so little left. Here is my update:

 

 

Things to complete: (Blog #11)
So, what is left to do? Here is my list:

  • Solder the sensors to the leads
  • Attach everything to the suit
  • Add in the carbon fiber power quick disconnects
  • Heater manual over ride
  • Case for computer and switch
  • Make pockets in the suit to hold the power supplies (Ohhhh Chrystal!!!)
  • Water proof the computer and hardware
  • Testing of completed suit

 

So lets start at the top of the list.

 

1) Solder the sensors to the leads: I used CAT5 wire for my leads to the sensors as it is small and light. I have a lot of CAT5 wire laying around so it was put to good use. The wires are connected to the computer and work great. This wasn't until after a long battle with sensors. You can read about that in previous blogs.

 

2) Attach everything to the suit: Chrystal wanted to do this part so I left it up to her. The battery packs fit perfectly into the pockets of the top half of the suit **I don't think she wanted to sew more pockets**. She then sewed in tie-off strings to secure the wires in place so they won't get tangled up or caught on each other. This isn't the perfect solution but it does work. Chrystal did her best and I am proud of her.

 

3) Quick disconnects: These work very well and are located in a spot where easy access is.

 

4) Power over ride: I soldered in switches to over-ride the power to the heating elements. This will allow the user to turn on the heat if anything were to fail.

 

5) Sew in pockets: As written above, Chrystal got lazy and used the existing pockets

 

6) Water proof computer: This is now complete, like shown in a previous blog I used an acrylic conforming spray that waterproofs electronics.

 

Below is some update pictures with labels 1-6 for each of the above:

 

DSC01246.JPG

 

DSC01245.JPG

 

So close, things to finish:

  • Enclosure for the computer and switches
  • Final testing and Blog

 

Thank you for reading and following my project:

 

Dale Winhold

Hi Everyone,

 

This will be a short update on how things are coming along. In the past week I have been fighting a bad flu bug so I didn't get as far as I thought.

 

So, I have been wiring the power that goes to the heat elements complete with disconnects. Where the power runs into the 8 switch relay is where I put in the by pass switches. Now there is the ability for the user to heat the suit in case of computer malfunction. Due to the importance of this suit we can't rely 100% on the computer, if the user is out in extreme cold and the computer fails, without a bypass, they would freeze.

 

Switches.jpg

One of the biggest concerns of mine as well as others is moisture. I have solved this issue with the electronics, I am using a conformal coating to waterproof all electronics and wiring (this is shown in a previous blog). I have been testing the heating elements (Made from carbon fiber) to see what happens if they get wet from moisture. There isn't any effect to the element if it gets a bit damp from moisture, no shorting or over heating. Now the element heats up from the positive being hooked to 1 end and the negative hooked to the other. I haven't tested to see what happens if the element gets soaked in water as of yet.

 

I am getting very close to doing the final testing of the suit. My next blog will be of the fully assembled suit and showing the pre-testing of how it works.

 

Thank you for reading this update

 

Dale Winhold

In this post, I will show how everything is coming together and works. After a frustrating 2 ½ weeks with my code not working with the temperature sensors I got that issue solved. I did post the solution but here it is again. There was an error with Energia compiling the code for the MSP432 Red. Before I knew this, an error showed up while compiling saying “analogRead” was not declared. This was odd but I declared it in my code and everything compiled but wouldn’t read the sensors. I searched the internet for solutions and finally found a forum where this issue was brought up. There was a reply saying that 1 week ago Energia released an update to correct this issue.... Really…. So, I did an update and everything compiled and ran exactly as it should have. Now that all is good I can continue with my project!!!

 

 

Code completed and working:

//Winter Survival Suit Temperature
//Dale Winhold
//C = (F - 32)/ 1.8; Convert to celcius
#include "SPI.h"
#include "OneMsTaskTimer.h"
#include "LCD_SharpBoosterPack_SPI.h"
LCD_SharpBoosterPack_SPI myScreen;
int llPin = A14;       //Temperature sensor Left Leg
int rlPin = A13;       //Temperature sensor Right Leg
int laPin = A11;       //Temperature sensor Left Arm
int raPin = A9;        //Temperature sensor Right Arm
int ltPin = A8;        //Temperature sensor Left Torso
int rtPin = A6;        //Temperature sensor Right Torso
int LLegValue = 0;            
int RLegValue = 0;           
int LArmValue = 0;  
int RArmValue = 0;
int LTorsoValue = 0;
int RTorsoValue = 0;
int SettempValue = 25;
String LLegStr;
String RLegStr;
String LArmStr;
String RArmStr;
String LTorsoStr;
String RTorsoStr;
String SettempStr;
// setup 
void setup() {
    Serial.begin(9600);
    myScreen.begin();
   // setup LCD 
    myScreen.clearBuffer();   
    myScreen.setFont(0);
    myScreen.text(3, 1, "Set Temp:   c");
    myScreen.text(3, 14, "L-Leg       c");
    myScreen.text(3, 27, "R-Leg       c");
    myScreen.text(3, 40, "L-Arm       c");
    myScreen.text(3, 53, "R-Arm       c");
    myScreen.text(3, 66, "L-Tor       c");
  
    myScreen.text(3, 79, "R-Tor       c");
  
    myScreen.flush();
}
 
void loop()
{
  LLegValue = analogRead(llPin);    //Reading Temperature
    
  RLegValue = analogRead(rlPin); 
       
  LArmValue = analogRead(laPin);    
    
  RArmValue = analogRead(raPin); 
     
  LTorsoValue = analogRead(ltPin);
  
  RTorsoValue = analogRead(rtPin);
   
  LLegStr = String((LLegValue-32)*5/9);        //Converting F to C
  RLegStr = String((RLegValue-32)*5/9);          
  LArmStr = String((LArmValue-32)*5/9);          
  RArmStr = String((RArmValue-32)*5/9);        
  LTorsoStr = String((LTorsoValue-32)*5/9);       
  RTorsoStr = String((RTorsoValue-32)*5/9);
  
  SettempStr = String(SettempValue);

//Display temperature
    myScreen.setFont(0);
    myScreen.text(60, 1, SettempStr + "");
    myScreen.text(60, 14, LLegStr + ""); 
    myScreen.text(60, 27, RLegStr + "");   
    myScreen.text(60, 40, LArmStr + "");   
    myScreen.text(60, 53, RArmStr + "");  
    myScreen.text(60, 66, LTorsoStr + "");
    myScreen.text(60, 79, RTorsoStr + "");
    myScreen.flush();
//Heat on or off
if (((LLegValue-32)*5/9) < (SettempValue-3)) //Heat On
{
  digitalWrite(40, HIGH); //Power on to Relay Module to open power supply to carbon fiber
  myScreen.setFont(0);
  myScreen.text(85, 14, "H"); //Displays heat on icon
}
if (((LLegValue-32)*5/9) > (SettempValue+3))  //Heat off
{
  digitalWrite(40, LOW);  //Power off to Relay Module to close power supply to carbon fiber
  myScreen.setFont(0);
  myScreen.text(85, 14, "L"); //Displays heat off icon
}
if (((RLegValue-32)*5/9) < (SettempValue-3))
{
  digitalWrite(39, HIGH);
  myScreen.setFont(0);
  myScreen.text(85, 27, "H");
}
if (((RLegValue-32)*5/9) > (SettempValue+3))
{
  digitalWrite(39, LOW);
  myScreen.setFont(0);
  myScreen.text(85, 27, "L");
}
if (((LArmValue-32)*5/9) < (SettempValue-3))
{
  digitalWrite(38, HIGH);
  myScreen.setFont(0);
  myScreen.text(85, 40, "H");
}
if (((LArmValue-32)*5/9) > (SettempValue+3))
{
  digitalWrite(38, LOW);
  myScreen.setFont(0);
  myScreen.text(85, 40, "L");
}
if (((RArmValue-32)*5/9) < (SettempValue-3))
{
  digitalWrite(37, HIGH);
  myScreen.setFont(0);
  myScreen.text(85, 53, "H");
}
if (((RArmValue-32)*5/9) > (SettempValue+3))
{
  digitalWrite(37, LOW);
  myScreen.setFont(0);
  myScreen.text(85, 53, "L");
}
if (((LTorsoValue-32)*5/9) < (SettempValue-3))
{
  digitalWrite(36, HIGH);
  myScreen.setFont(0);
  myScreen.text(85, 66, "H");
}
if (((LTorsoValue-32)*5/9) > (SettempValue+3))
{
  digitalWrite(36, LOW);
  myScreen.setFont(0);
  myScreen.text(85, 66, "L");
}
if (((RTorsoValue-32)*5/9) < (SettempValue-3))
{
  digitalWrite(35, HIGH);
    myScreen.setFont(0);
  myScreen.text(85, 79, "H");
}
if (((RTorsoValue-32)*5/9) > (SettempValue+3))
{
  digitalWrite(35, LOW);
  myScreen.setFont(0);
  myScreen.text(85, 79, "L");
}
delay(100);
}

 

Hope it made sense!!

 

The suit:

All the carbon fiber is sewn into the suit (Thanks to my daughter Chrystal) and I have run tests for how many volts makes the carbon fiber heat up enough, but not to hot. For the legs and torso strips I need to have 14.8v to get me 52 deg C (125 deg F) which I found a very comfortable warmth. For the same result in the arms I required 7.4v, go figure, Chrystal made the carbon fiber ½ the length in the arms!! (Made my life easier). For fun, I ran the 14.8v to the arms to see how hot the carbon fiber would get, I disconnected the power when the temperature reached 86 deg C (187 deg F). Here again as suggested by DAB, I am doing a quick disconnect to all the carbon fiber as well as a manual over ride in case the computer should fail. Being a survival suit, the need to survive can’t rely solely on the computer working so I am putting over ride switches to each area for manual operation of the heater (this is not completed yet). Pictures below:

 

DSC01101.JPG

 

 

 

The wiring:
I ran CAT5e wires to the sensors. I found this was a nice light weight wire that was easy to use. As per DAB’s suggestion, I did a quick disconnect for the sensors in the legs (and the carbon fiber explained later). Since I am using CAT5e I wired in the usual male/female connector as my quick disconnect. It works very well as shown in the pictures:

 

DSC01113.JPG

 

DSC01114.JPG

 

 

I only had the leg sensors attached at this time, as you can see the four real weird temperatures and 2 correct ones!!

DSC01117.JPG

 

All hooked up!!

DSC01123.JPG

 

 

For a bit of a laugh, here is a picture of my home made board I through together that connects to the bottom of the MSP432. I did a PCB layout on AutoCAD, printed out an acid etch transfer and found I didn't have any blank PCB board left. No one in town had any either. I hope to get some in so I can make this a little more prettier.

DSC01126.JPG

 

 

 

Things to complete:
So, what is left to do? Here is my list:

  • Solder the sensors to the leads
  • Attach everything to the suit
  • Add in the carbon fiber power quick disconnects
  • Heater manual over ride
  • Case for computer and switch
  • Make pockets in the suit to hold the power supplies (Ohhhh Chrystal!!!)
  • Water proof the computer and hardware
  • Testing of completed suit

 

I want to thank everyone (dougw balearicdynamics jancumps mbozdal mcb1 DAB **Sorry if I missed anyone**) for their help these past few weeks with my frustrations. I'm so happy those issues are out of the way!!

 

I also want to send an extra special thank you to DAB for the excellent suggestions he gave me to add into the suit. I'm using them all!! I truly can't thank you enough!!

 

Dale Winhold

I'm not sure how much of an update this is considered. I am having issues with the temperature sensors (DS18B20 Temperature Sensors) which are OneWire. Now the issue is that they don't work on the MSP432P401R. I have tried everything in the past 2 weeks and a lot of different coding to no avail. I copied and pasted code and even used the code in Energia for the OneWire temperature sensors and nothing worked. I found some information on line saying all the coding for the sensor works on the MSP430. When I used the sample code and compiled it for the MSP430 it worked, but it crashes for the MSP432. Since this is what I require to finish my project I require help on finding the correct sensors. I have the suit complete with the heat elements sewn in. The power supply is ready and wires are run throughout the suit, I just need working sensors.

 

A quick update on the waterproofing of the board with the acrylic conformal coating. I filled a tray with water and added salt (quite a bit of salt), powered up the test Arduino and set it into the salt water for 2 hours. (I kept the plugged-in end out of the water). I then took it out and let it dry off (It kept working and I didn't wash it off). A week later (2 days ago) I plugged it in and it is still working so I put it into another tray full of salt water for 1 more hour (It still is working). I did wash it off with clean water and it is no worse for wear, I am very impressed with the coating, giving me different use ideas for the future.

 

So, I require any help or advice available

 

My question to everyone, what temperature sensors work on the MSP432? Since I already spent money on sensors that don't work, I need to get the correct ones (Quickly).

 

Thank you for any help you can give

 

Dale Winhold

This update is about water proofing my project. Everything done here is the first time I ever worked with this product and it was done live, so if it fails we will all see it go wrong. There are 3 videos attached, the first is showing the product, second is applying it to the board and third is putting the powered board under running water.

 

I use an Arduino Uno as a test so if this doesn't work I don't wreck the MSP432.

 

So, what do you think? Will it work? Fail? Here is the challenge, post below before you watch the last video and say weather you think it worked or if I ruined my Arduino Uno. Don't give it away (at least for a couple of days) after you watch.

 

Video #1 (The Acrylic Conformal Coating)

 

 

 

Video #2 (Spraying it on the board) **As a note - Take every safety precaution when using this, it is poisonous**

 

 

Video #3 (Water testing)

 

 

Hope you enjoyed watching.

 

Dale Winhold

This week’s update is about the temperature sensors and dealing with the possibility of moisture issues.

 

First is the temperature sensors:

 

I finally received the temperature sensors yesterday!! I have been working most of today with Energia to get them working. At the time of writing this blog I am still working on the script. I will post an update blog when it’s up and running. The sensors are the DS18B20 Temperature Sensors. OneWire requires a single 4.7K pullup resistor, connected between the pin and +5 volts. Then just connect each 1-wire device to the pin and ground. Some 1-wire devices can also connect to power, or get their power from the signal wire. It looks like I made a bit more work for myself ordering this type of sensor. This Maxim series temperature sensor works on the Maxim OneWire protocol which needs a single contact serial interface. I downloaded the libraries “OneWire-master” and “Dallas Temperature” then transferred them into the libraries folder in Energia. It looks like I will be doing some re-programming of my script to get the MSP432 to read the sensors. At least I can move forward on my project!!

 

 

This information was copied from https://www.pjrc.com/teensy/td_libs_OneWire.html

 

 

Basic Usage

OneWire myWire(pin)

Create the OneWire object, using a specific pin. Even though you
can connect many 1 wire devices to the same pin, if you have a large number,
smaller groups each on their own pin can help isolate wiring problems. You can
create multiple OneWire objects, one for each pin.

 

myWire.search(addrArray)

Search for the next device. The addrArray is an 8 byte array. If
a device is found, addrArray is filled with the device's address and true is
returned. If no more devices are found, false is returned.

 

myWire.reset_search()

Begin a new search. The next use of search will begin at the
first device.

 

myWire.reset()

Reset the 1-wire bus. Usually this is needed before communicating
with any device.

 

myWire.select(addrArray)

Select a device based on its address. After a reset, this is
needed to choose which device you will use, and then all communication will be
with that device, until another reset.

 

myWire.skip()

Skip the device selection. This only works if you have a single
device, but you can avoid searching and use this to immediatly access your
device.

 

myWire.write(num);

Write a byte.

 

myWire.write(num, 1);

Write a byte, and leave power applied to the 1 wire bus.

 

myWire.read()

Read a byte.

 

myWire.crc8(dataArray, length)

Compute a CRC check on an array of data.

 

 

 

Second is the moisture issue:

 

I have purchased a liquid that can be applied to the electronic circuits that protects them against moisture and other environmental concerns. I added the product description below. The cost was $23 cdn through Amazon.

 

MG Chemicals Acrylic Lacquer Conformal Coating

 

  • 419C Acrylic Conformal Coating is an IPC 830 certified, fast drying, xylene and toluene free product that provides an excellent finish. It is easy to use and does not require special or costly equipment to apply
  • It is ideal for high moisture environments and applications requiring easy repair and rework
  • The 419C coating protects electric circuit against moisture, dirt, dust, thermal shocks, and scratches that could corrode, short circuit, or otherwise damage the electric component
  • It insulate against high-voltage arcing, shorts and static discharges; this coating provides high dielectric withstand voltage allows traces to be put closer together helping with miniaturization

 

Product description

419C Acrylic Conformal Coating is an IPC 830 certified, fast drying, xylene and toluene free product that provides an excellent finish. It is easy to use and does not require special or costly equipment to apply. It is ideal for high moisture environments and applications requiring easy repair and rework. The 419C coating protects electric circuit against moisture, dirt, dust, thermal shocks, and scratches that could corrode, short circuit, or otherwise damage the electric component. It insulates against high-voltage arcing, shorts, and static discharges. As well as, this coating provides a high dielectric withstand voltage that allows traces to be put closer together helping with miniaturization. Super fast cure - reduces production and maintenance bottlenecks. No hazardous air pollutants - free of toluene and xylene. Externally qualified to IPC-CC-830B by Pacific Testing Laboratories, Inc. Meets UL 94V-0. UL Recognized. Excellent finish - smooth, homogeneous, and durable crystal clear coat. Protects electronics from moisture, corrosion, fungus, and static discharges. Easy to inspect - fluoresces under UV. Easy rework and repairs - can solder through coat; remove with MG Chemicals Thinner/Cleaner or Conformal Coating Stripper. Visual crystal clear color. Excellent solderability, weather resistance, fungus resistance, flexibility, moisture and insulation resistance and thermal shock. 94V-0 Flammability. Ether-like, gasoline and minty odor. 3-5 minutes tack free. 2 minutes recoat time. 24 hours full cure (at room temperature). 30 minutes full cure (at 65 degree C /149 degreee F). -65 to 125 degree C service temperature. Less than 12 800 sq cm (less than 13.7 sq ft) maximum coverage for 25 micrometer (1 mil). ROHS Compliant.

 

Thank you

 

Dale Winhold

Safe and Sound Post#7 (Let there be power)

 

Unfortunately I still haven't received my temperature sensors, so I am unable to fully assemble the suit. I have the carbon fiber sewn into the suit and ready to be tested. This past week I have wired the computer to the power switch and ran all the wires required to power the suit. I used alligator clips to connect the wires to the carbon fiber, this will also act as a quick connect/disconnect. It will also act as a safety if something should go wrong. I am also going to wire in an override, so if the computer should fail the suit will be useable. This is an absolute requirement, if the suit shuts down it could be the difference of life and death.

 

Below are pictures of the computer hooked up to the switch and powered:

 

DSC01071.JPG

 

DSC01074.JPG

 

 

In the picture below the temperature has a negative number, this is due to not being connected to the temperature sensors. It does show the switch has power on to all 6 connections trying to send power to the carbon fiber.

 

DSC01073.JPG

 

Thank you

 

Dale W

For this weeks update I will be discussing the power requirements to heat the suit. I have finished sewing in the carbon fiber heating tape into the suit. I used 750mm lengths of tape to keep my power consumption consistent (It also worked out that way). For each leg I used 2 lengths, for the arms I used 1 length each and for the torso I used 4 lengths. If I would have thought this out when I ordered the carbon fiber I would have ordered more, I bought just enough for my suit but the wife and kids are now wanting more apparel made with the heating ability; I guess I will be ordering more shortly.

 

So, with 750mm (29 ½”) carbon fiber tape, using 7.4v @ .53 amps uses 3.56 Watts of power. This will give me a temperature of 42.2c (107.96F). This temperature isn’t to hot (It may even be to low) but this can
be adjusted by the power supply.

 

Note:

Heating pads – Low: 43c (110F) Med: 59c (138F) High: 71c (160F)

 

My power supply is made up of 10 – 18650 Batteries. Each battery is 3.7V 2600mAH, this will allow 50% of the suit to be heated at the same time. With my experience in Search and Rescue and outdoor survival this
should be adequate to keep you warm and safe. If for unforeseen reasons all elements of the suit need to be on all elements would reach a temperature of 33.2c (91.76F)

 

Power supply layout:

Power layout.png

 

 

I am still waiting for my temperature sensors to arrive, hopefully this week so I can give a more in depth report next week.

 

Dale Winhold

Safe and Sound – Winter Survival Suit Post 5

 

Here is where I am at so far. I am waiting for my temperature sensors to arrive (Taking a lot longer then expected). I do have everything else required to complete the project. For the past week, I have
been working on sewing the carbon fiber into the suit as well as programming the  MSP-EXP432P401RMSP-EXP432P401R to regulate the suits temperature I will be using an 8 Relay Module to control the power going to the carbon fiber

 

For those of you interested in the Carbon Fiber, here is the link: http://www.carbonheater.us/

 

Below is the code I am using for the suit (Still more to add). I am using Energia 1.6.10E18 to program the EXP432.

 

 

 

 

//Winter Survival Suit Temperature
//Dale Winhold
//Deg C = (F – 32) / 1.8; Convert to celcius


#include "SPI.h"

#include "OneMsTaskTimer.h"

#include "LCD_SharpBoosterPack_SPI.h"

#define analogRead



LCD_SharpBoosterPack_SPI myScreen;

int llPin = A14;      //Temperature sensor Left Leg
int rlPin = A13;      //Temperature sensor Right Leg
int laPin = A11;     //Temperature sensor Left Arm
int raPin = A9;      //Temperature sensor Right Arm
int ltPin = A8;       //Temperature sensor Left Torso
int rtPin = A6;       //Temperature sensor Right Torso

int LLegValue = 0;            
int RLegValue = 0;           
int LArmValue = 0; 
int RArmValue = 0;
int LTorsoValue = 0;
int RTorsoValue = 0;
int Settemp = 37;

String LLegStr;
String RLegStr;
String LArmStr;
String RArmStr;
String LTorsoStr;
String RTorsoStr;
String SettempStr;


 // setup 

void setup() {

   
Serial.begin(9600);

   
myScreen.begin();



 // setup LCD 

   
myScreen.clearBuffer();

      
myScreen.setFont(0);

   
myScreen.text(3, 1, "Set Temp:  c");

   
myScreen.text(3, 14, "L-Leg      c");

   
myScreen.text(3, 27, "R-Leg      c");

   
myScreen.text(3, 40, "L-Arm      c");

   
myScreen.text(3, 53, "R-Arm      c");

   
myScreen.text(3, 66, "L-Tor      c");
  
   
myScreen.text(3, 79, "R-Tor      c");
  


   
myScreen.flush();

}



void loop()

{

  LLegValue = analogRead(llPin);  
    
  RLegValue = analogRead(rlPin); 
       
  LArmValue = analogRead(laPin);    
    
  RArmValue = analogRead(raPin); 
     
  LTorsoValue = analogRead(ltPin);
  
  RTorsoValue = analogRead(rtPin);

  
//Convert to celcius
  LLegValue = (LLegValue - 32)/ 1.8;       

  RLegValue = (RLegValue - 32)/ 1.8;          

  LArmValue = (LArmValue - 32)/ 1.8;          

  RArmValue = (RArmValue - 32)/ 1.8;        

  LTorsoValue = (LTorsoValue - 32)/ 1.8;       

  RTorsoValue = (RTorsoValue - 32)/ 1.8;

  
  LLegStr = String(LLegValue);        

  RLegStr = String(RLegValue);          

  LArmStr = String(LArmValue);          

  RArmStr = String(RArmValue);        

  LTorsoStr = String(LTorsoValue);       

  RTorsoStr = String(RTorsoValue);
  
  SettempStr = String(Settemp);



   
myScreen.setFont(0);

   
myScreen.text(60, 1, SettempStr + "");

   
myScreen.text(60, 14, LLegStr + ""); 

   
myScreen.text(60, 27, RLegStr + "");   

   
myScreen.text(60, 40, LArmStr + "");   

   
myScreen.text(60, 53, RArmStr + "");  

   
myScreen.text(60, 66, LTorsoStr + "");

   
myScreen.text(60, 79, RTorsoStr + "");
  

   
myScreen.flush();



//Heat on or off
if (LLegValue < 32)
{
  digitalWrite(40, HIGH);
  myScreen.setFont(0);
  myScreen.text(85, 14, "H"); //Displays heat on icon
}

if (LLegValue > 39)
{
  digitalWrite(40, LOW);
  myScreen.setFont(0);
  myScreen.text(85, 14, "L"); //Displays heat off icon
}


if (RLegValue < 32)
{
  digitalWrite(41, HIGH);
  myScreen.setFont(0);
  myScreen.text(85, 27, "H");
}

if (RLegValue > 39)
{
  digitalWrite(41, LOW);
  myScreen.setFont(0);
  myScreen.text(85, 27, "L");
}


if (LArmValue < 32)
{
  digitalWrite(42, HIGH);
  myScreen.setFont(0);
  myScreen.text(85, 40, "H");
}

if (LArmValue > 39)
{
  digitalWrite(42, LOW);
  myScreen.setFont(0);
  myScreen.text(85, 40, "L");
}

if (RArmValue < 32)
{
  digitalWrite(43, HIGH);
  myScreen.setFont(0);
  myScreen.text(85, 53, "H");
}


if (RArmValue > 39)
{
  digitalWrite(43, LOW);
  myScreen.setFont(0);
  myScreen.text(85, 53, "L");
}

if (LTorsoValue < 32)
{
  digitalWrite(44, HIGH);
  myScreen.setFont(0);
  myScreen.text(85, 66, "H");
}


if (LTorsoValue > 39)
{
  digitalWrite(44, LOW);
  myScreen.setFont(0);
  myScreen.text(85, 66, "L");
}

if (RTorsoValue < 32)
{
  digitalWrite(45, HIGH);
  myScreen.setFont(0);
  myScreen.text(85, 79, "H");
}


if (RTorsoValue > 39)
{
  digitalWrite(45, LOW);
  myScreen.setFont(0);
  myScreen.text(85, 79, "L");
}



    

  delay(100);

} 

 

 

 

 

Below is a picture of the code running on the MSP432 with the SHARP96 (ignore the suit temperatures as I don’t have the temperature sensors as of yet)

 

DSC01070.JPG

Hello everyone, this post is about carbon fiber tape and how it will be used.

 

The carbon fiber tape has arrived!! This update is showing how well the carbon fiber works as a heating element. Below are pictures of the carbon fiber. In them you can see that it is like fabric, it feels like silk. I am using 18650 3.7v 2600mAH batteries, I have purchased 8 of them hoping that will be enough for the entire suit to operate; they are rechargeable!!

 

Here is some interesting fact about carbon fiber:

 

It’s very soft, thin and flexible which enables it to be used in a wide range of textile applications where it may be subjected to continual movement and bending. The carbon fiber tape has similar characteristics to other heating elements available on the market however it is unique because of its flexibility and softness. In addition, another crucial factor with carbon fiber tape is that, unlike conventional heaters, it emits infrared heat that not only warms the top layer of the body but can also penetrate up to 5cm deep into the body making it far superior to other heating solutions currently on the market.

 

The maximum temperature is 400 degrees Celsius (752 degrees Fahrenheit). When over 400 degrees Celsius the carbon starts to oxidise into carbon dioxide and will start to evaporate. At 1200 degrees Celsius it'll last for a few hours but this decreases to just minutes when exceeding 1250 degrees Celsius. In a vacuum with no oxygen present it can generate more than 3000 degrees Celsius. When connecting the carbon tape, it is very important to ensure good contact between
the carbon fiber tape and the wires. The surface of the carbon tape will always be a reliable electrical conductor due to the surface oxidation turning into a gas and dispersing. This is unlike the surface of metals, for example copper, where because of oxidation the copper is coated with copper oxide which hinders a good electrical contact because copper oxide does not conduct electricity. Overtime this eventually results in contact failure which leads to power loss and potentially the overheating of contact points.

 

How to decide on what batteries to use for power. Under laboratory conditions there are batteries with and energy density of 200 (400)Wh/kg, but commercially available batteries are no more than 250 h/kg. Knowing the weight of your battery will give you a rough estimation of the maximum amount of energy it can supply. For example, an 18650 battery weighs about 50 grams so we can estimate that for a good quality, high capacity cell the battery could provide 12 watts of power. (0.25 x 50 = 12.5 watts). This theoretical calculation corresponds to the declared parameters of the Panasonic 3400 which is one of the most expense 18650 batteries commercially available. When selecting a battery, you should choose one that has a greater capacity than the amount of power you expect your heated clothing to use. For example, if your heated vest uses 30 watts it should be able to function for up to 1 hour from three 18650 batteries.

 

Carbon fiber tape can be washed in the washing machine, but for this application it’s not recommended due to the wiring.

 

Here are the specs for the tape I am using:

 

Carbon fiber tape

Specifications:

Material:

Carbon   fiber 100%

Type:

Heating element

Resistance:

18±2 Ohm/m ( 5.5±0.5 Ohm/ft )

Weight

5±0.5 g/m (1.5±0.15 g/ft)

Width:

17±2 mm (0.67±0.08 in)

Thickness:

0.6±0.1 mm (0.024±0.004 in)

Tensile  strength:

50±10 kg

 

 

Pictures of the carbon fiber:

 

DSC01056.JPG

 

DSC01057.JPG

 

 

Set up for the temperature test. I wanted to see how hot an 8" length piece of tape would get with 2 - 3.7v 2600mAH batteries for power.

DSC01058.JPG

 

Watch the video to see the results (3.5 minutes long). Sorry for it being dark (and me babbling on and on).

 

 

Thank you for reading and watching

 

Dale Winhold

 

Hi everyone!!

 

Today there was a delightful surprise waiting for me when I got home!! The Safe and Sound Texas Instruments kit arrived. Attached are pictures of the opening and everything that arrived.

 

DSC01038.JPG

 

Waiting to be opened!!

 

DSC01039.JPG

 

Look what is inside...

 

DSC01040.JPG

 

Out of the box, really nice!! Thank you Texas Instruments & Element14. Now the fun begins

 

DSC01041.JPG

 

DSC01044.JPG

 

DSC01045.JPG

 

DSC01047.JPG

 

DSC01048.JPG

 

The main part of the project!!

 

DSC01049.JPG

 

DSC01050.JPG

 

That is the complete kit, quite a selection of hardware to use. I am going to use most of the kit for the suit (just need to receive the carbon fiber and power supply). Now the fun begins!!

 

Dale Winhold

In this posting I will show how the heating will work.

 

I haven't received the Carbon Fiber (It has been shipped from Russia) so this will be my backup. I have taken apart a 12v heated seat cushion for the element wire. Below are photos of how I set it up and used 4 C-cell batteries to supply the power (C-cell batteries are bulky so they won't be used in the suit. I used 12 feet of heating element (A lot longer then what I will be using in the suit). From the start temperature to full temperature it took 3.5 minutes, this time will be cut down when I shorten the length for the element. I ran this test in the basement which was fairly cool (18 deg C/65 deg F), the wire was (20 deg C/68 deg F) when I started the test. As you can see in the photos the temperature topped out at (41 deg C/108 deg F). Once at full temperature it took 2 minutes to cool down, this is once I covered it up with a towel to simulate clothing. I understand that carbon fiber reaches temperature within 20 seconds, this will be what I want in order for the suit to work effectively.

 

DSC01035.JPG

4 C-cell batteries to power the test

 

DSC01009.JPG

The heating element wire (The white wire). I wrapped it in tape so I could insert the thermometer

 

DSC01010.JPG

All set up for the test

 

DSC01014.JPG

Start temperature

 

DSC01017.JPG

45 second mark

 

DSC01019.JPG

2 min 15 second mark

 

DSC01023.JPG

3 minute mark, almost to temperature

 

DSC01029.JPG

Up to temperature, this did take longer then I expected, but it was 12 feet of element.

 

 

I have also been working with Texas Instruments Code Composer to start programming the MSP432P401R. This will hopefully be ready for running trial code when the hardware is received!!

 

Dale Winhold

Safe and Sound – Cold Weather Survival Suit Post #1

 

Reason why:

This is a news report from January 11th, 2017:

 

On Tuesday, the warnings covered northeastern Alberta, almost all of Saskatchewan and much of western Manitoba. All people
in those regions are being warned of extreme conditions into Wednesday morning that feel like -45 to -52 with the wind.

 

Attached is another Alberta winter weather report from 2 weeks ago.

 

Temperature.jpg

 

As you can see, we get severe cold weather and like it or not we still go out. Either going to work, shopping or recreational the weather
doesn’t get in our way. When I get up to go to work in this cold time of year I always wish there was a better way to stay warm.

 

This is how I came up with the Cold Weather Survival Suit.

 

Explanation of my project

I will take full body thermal underwear and have it computer controlled to:

  • Monitor body temperature at 7 points and outside
    temperature
  • Display information on the LCD screen
  • Display warnings when your temperature drops
    below a set amount
  • Warm the part of you that is getting to cold

 

How this will work

The TI  MSP-EXP432P401RMSP-EXP432P401R will monitor the sensors and control the heat The  430BOOST-SHARP96430BOOST-SHARP96 will display the information to the person
wearing the suit. I will also be using the BOOSTXL-SENSORS to pick-up other important information about the environment.

 

Heating of the suit

I have purchased (and now waiting to arrive) 8 meters of 15mm wide Carbon Fiber Tape. Carbon fiber tape is soft like silk and is 100%
washable. When electricity is put to it, it heats up like a heating blanket. The more electricity, the hotter it gets. Therefore the computer controlling
the carbon fiber will be very efficient for keeping the wearer warm.

 

Below are the carbon fiber specifications:

 

Specifications:

Material:

Carbon
  fiber 100%

Type:

Heating element

Resistance:

18±2
  Ohm/m ( 5.5±0.5 Ohm/ft )

Weight

5±0.5
  g/m (1.5±0.15 g/ft)

Width:

17±2 mm
  (0.67±0.08 in)

Thickness:

0.6±0.1
  mm (0.024±0.004 in)

Tensile
  strength
:

50±10 kg

 

 

15mm%203,7v.jpg

 

Diagram of the suit

 

baselayer-thermal-underwear.jpg

There will be sensors and carbon fiber elements in the back as well the head

 

 

 

Final Thoughts

 

This is a project I have wanted to make for a few years, now is a great opportunity to make create my idea. Something I will definitely use as well !!

 

Dale Winhold