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Upcycle It

14 Posts authored by: gpolder
<< Previous Blog Index It's been a tough, although certainly fun three months competing in the Upcycle It challenge. In this last blog I will present a wrap up of the Upcycled Nixie Display project. First of all I would like to thank Element14 and Intel® for organising and sponsoring another great challenge. For a long time I already had the plan to upgrade the nixie counter found on my attic by adding some kind of Arduino board. Due to this challenge my plans came to existence in a ...
<< Previous Blog Index Next >> Inspired on blog posts from my fellow challengers sakthi.1260, carmelito and Workshopshed, as well as mcb1's comment on my first blog: When I saw the application, my first thought is how does someone know what the numbers represent ... they are numbers. I'm sure as you progress that will be sorted. I decided to let my display speak the different functions when changed with the button. The problem mcb1 mentioned was already solved by the menu system and ...
<< Previous Blog Index Next >> Time is going fast, and the project submission deadline approaches quickly. In order to finish the project as complete as possible I had a quick look at what the original plan was in my application: to add the Intel® Edison to this display, in order to display a six digit number using Intel® Edison's wifi connection connected to the internet. An IoT nixie display so to say. The number displayed can be anything, of course it can be the curren ...
<< Previous Blog Index Next >> Last week I more or less finished the hardware, time to work on the software. In this post I will explain the bits and pieces, the complete software source including the XDK project can be cloned from GitHub (https://github.com/AgriVision
ixie_display ).   Also mcb1 brought up the question how to know which function is displayed on the six digits when displaying all the different information like time, date, weather etc.  To be honest I did ...
<< Previous Blog Index Next >> Last week I told you my plan to switch to the other Edison with the Mini Breakout Board and mount this board inside the display case. This weeks blog has a lot of images, to show the process of putting it all together. Updating and installing the Edison was not a big issue, but then I came at a point that I completely overlooked. The GPIO levels of the Mini Breakout Board are 1.8V, instead of 5V like with the Edison Kit for Arduino and GROVE kit. So ...
<< Previous Blog Index Next >> Last week I promised to add an I2C node to Node-RED in order to control the PCF8574AN IO expander. Unfortunately I lost a lot of time in trying all kind of different options, got stuck in version differences and didn't have much progress. In the mean time I came across Johnny-Five: The JavaScript Robotics & IoT Platform. Luckily this platform brought me again on track. I will very briefly mention my actions regarding Node-RED, and then explain how ...
<< Previous Blog Index Next >> The blog of this week is completely about hardware.   PCBs arrived Last  week the PCBs arrived. As a student 30 years ago I made my own PCBs with rub-down symbols and black tape on transparencies. The transparencies were transferred to photosensitive print material using an UV light-box whereafter the print material was etched using dirty toxic chemicals. For this challenge it was the first time I made a PCB the clean way, by drawing in Eag ...
<< Previous Blog Index Next >> This week I played a lot with the Edison software tools. In my fourth blog I described my first steps using the Arduino SDK. As I was not completely happy with that, I switched to XDK, Node.js and Node-RED. I also detected that my firmware wasn't updated by then. This is also fixed now. Node-RED is a visual programming environment. To be honest normally my preference does not ly with visual programming, I rather prefer Matlab for instance above LabVi ...
<< Previous Blog Index Next >> In blog post [Upcycle It] Nixie Display #2 - Investigations I explained my plan to replace the 7490's with a small circuit board with an I/O extender in order to drive the BCD inputs on the 74141 display drivers. Member COMPACT suggested to use a PSoC. I did a nice project in the past on a 5LP (PSoC 5LP usage for Software defined radio receiver.) from which experience I'm sure PSoC is a good candidate. Nevertheless, I decided to solve it the easy way, ...
<< Previous Blog Index Next >> As mentioned in my previous blog the kit arrived this week. I couldn't resist to start playing. In this post I briefly mention my experience. Intel has a sound startup guide: https://software.intel.com/en-us/iot/hardware/edison. Also mcb1 wrote a very thorough introductory guide for the Edison (First Steps - Intel Edison ). It is not my intention to repeat what others already wrote, instead I focus on the aspects which differ in my case. I don't know fo ...
<< Previous Blog Index Next >> Got my kit yesterday.  I'm very happy it was here so soon.  Got it all out and made an unboxing video. Great that we got two Edison modules.   ...
Index for my Upcycle It design challenge project, in which I'm using the Intel® Edison to upcycle an old Nixie Display found in my attic.   Blog postsBlog Number Blog Link 1 [Upcycle It] Nixie Display #1 - Introduction 2 [Upcycle It] Nixie Display #2 - Investigations 3 [Upcycle It] Nixie Display #3 - Unboxing 4 [Upcycle It] Nixie Display #4 - Got Started with the Intel® Edison Development Board on macOS 5 [Upcycle It] Nixie Display #5 - I2C Interface to display drivers 6 [Upcycl ...
<< Previous Blog Index Next >>   In my first blog post I  described the idea and plan of converting my old nixie pulse counter to a versatile number display. My plan was based only on visual investigation of the hardware. In this post I will describe some test and measurements in order to get a solid plan for the conversion.   Nixie power Member mads391i asked for the power rating of the nixie tubes. Although not completely necessary to know for the purpose of the pr ...
Blog Index Next >>   Upcycled Intel Edison Nixie DisplayLook what I recently found on my attic. A nice box with a six digit nixie display. Even some documentation was in the box, showing that this is a 'Impulszähler EZK' from 'electromatic'. I can't remember how it found the way to my home. It might be that I bought it long ago on a flee market, or maybe I got it from a friend. Currently there is a lot of interest in bringing these nixie tubes to life. Lot's of nixie tube clock k ...