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Attached to this blog post is the handout which was used in the element14 booth at Maker Faire Detroit 2013: Sponsored by Element14   Presented by Jason Kridner with Drew Fustini, David Hamblin, Justin Triplett (i3 Detroit volunteer) and Mark Miles (i3 Detroit volunteer)   BeagleBone Black is a $45, 1GHz computer that ships with a Linux distribution on its on-board 2GB flash and has extensive I/O capabilities. We’ll be focusing on how you can wire up sensors and actuators us ...
I have attached slides from Jason Kridner's Physical Computing with JavaScript presentation at Sketching in Hardware 2013 (http://sketching-in-hardware.com/). ...
These were rendered from the mfg bundle, and may be useful for documenting any changes/wiring as people start to customize their boards.       ...
Following my last update, we decided to use TinyG to do motion control for our Pick-n-Place machine.  The BeagleBone Black needs to send the appropriate g-code over the serial port to tell the TinyG what movements to make.  One of our team members, Ed Bennett, had the idea of using the mouse to control the PnP machine while we continue to develop it.  For now, we need "exercise" the X-Y gantry to see how well it works before mounting Ed's vacuum nozzle head which has Z-axis and al ...
Vote for us here!   So we took this:     And ended up with this:     With Paul looking a bit perplexed at controlling the arms with the BeagleBone Black, the tracking actually works!     The above video is the OpenCV code tracking the direction of the ball and predicting where it will go so that the motors controlling the arms can react.     The above video shows the arms moving in reaction to the location of the ball; it acknowledg ...
Before I write about the Pick-n-Place (PnP) project at Pumping Station: One (Chicago's hackerspace), I thought those of you that might be Dr. Who fans would appreciate what we put on the roof of our building): source: http://pumpingstationone.org/2013/04/party-time-is-coming-up-fast/   PnP motion control idea #1 - LinuxCNC: Our first idea was to leverage existing open source CNC software called LinuxCNC (formerly EMC2).  Old PCs with parallel ports can be used to build a CNC contro ...
Introduction - why would you want to extend I/O over USB? The Beaglebone Black's PRU allows very high speed I/O capabilities with guaranteed timing while Linux applications continue to run. As useful as this is, occasionally there may be a need to use FTDI's USB-interfacing UART/FIFO ICs to extend capabilities further. There are a number of benefits to this:   * It increases the number of I/O pins available * It increases the number of serial interfaces * Provides interfacing to traditi ...
shabaz

BBB - Building a DAC

Posted by shabaz Top Member Jul 6, 2013
Introduction This project was about getting audio out of the BeagleBone Black. The aim was to have stereo audio, at least as good as an iPod. See further below for the circuit, and also a video showing it working. Later, this project was used to build a PCB design (see below for the link to this part 2, and then the PCB was used to make a home Sonos-type hi-fi audio player (see the link to part 3 below).   The BBB has an on-board I2S interface, which makes interfacing an external DAC easy ...
Introduction One of my good friends and I were at the local climbing gym staring at a moon board, when we (and by we, I mean he) had a great idea.  What if the climbing holds were lit up by LEDs to indicate which ones were fair game? This would eliminate the need to memorize where the hold was and what it looked like.  This way when you were climbing, and holding onto the wall with everything that you had, you didn’t need to fumble around for where to go next. It would be very ob ...