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I'm trying here is to let the real-time units of the BeagleBone generate the signals for a stepper motor. In this post: assign BB peripherals and wire up the stepper motor driver.   The DRV8711 stepper motor controller has a number of pins that need to be entertained by the BB. (for the wiring of motor and power supply, please check this post).   The controller requires a SPI connection, in order to set it in the desired operation mode. These SPI pins are connect to BB SPI0. Two ...
A little side story in the project to control a stepper motor with the BeagleBone PRU. How to enable SPI.   The  DRV8711 stepper motor controller that I use is configured with SPI commands. On a Raspberri Pi, activating SPI is done via the configuration tool. Easy. On the BB, it's more complex. It depends on the Linux flavour (and changing in the future, I've read - it's a bit tricky to find good documentation that's applicable for the current ). I got success using these two meth ...
I'm trying here is to let the real-time units of the BeagleBone generate the signals for a stepper motor. In this post: control two output pins from PRU and Linux   The PRU will have to drive two pins when driving the stepper motor. One for the direction of rotation. The other for the step pulses. I'll try here to send the PRU a number of steps, and a flag to give the direction. The PRU should then drive the DIR pin (high or low based on the parameter) and pulse the STEP pin the re ...
To control a stepper motor, your device has to create a pulse signal (pulse train). That signal will decide how many steps the motor takes and how fast it takes those steps. There are several ways to generate that signal: using timers, bitbang and others. What I'm trying here is to let the real-time units of the BeagleBone generate the pulses. image source: modified from TI Designs: High Performance Pulse Train Output (PTO) With PRU-ICSS for Industrial Applications     Intentio ...
Introduction:      FreeBSD is a "UNIX like" opensource operating system. Not like Linux, which provides only the kernel, FreeBSD provides full fledged - fully equipped operating system. The history of the operating system dates back to 1993. And it is the most popular BSD (Berkeley Software Distribution) based operating system available in the open source community.   I would recommend you to read the history of FreeBSD a little. Links are available here: https://en. ...

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