Skip navigation

Europe RoHS Directive

4 Posts authored by: VictoriaJones element14 Team
  Within three years of the original entry into force (or by 22nd July 2014), an impact assessment and review of RoHS 2 scope (including restricted substances) will take place. Depending on the outcome of the review and assessment, the scope may be altered and further restricted substances proposed. Four substances (HBCDD, DEHP, BBP and DBP) have already been highlighted for priority assessment.   The approach to the review and assessment has been documented in Article 6 of RoHS 2, ...
We're pleased to announce that Farnell was approached by the UK Government’s Department of Business Innovation and Skills (BIS) to produce a background piece on RoHS and WEEE recasts (RoHS 2 and WEEE 2). To read the article, please download the pdf at the bottom of the post.   The article links to a series of roadshows hosted by BIS to find out about changes within the RoHS and WEEE Directives.   The roadshows, which will take place across the UK, are free half day events where ...
  Mercury is perhaps the most commonly known of the RoHS hazardous substances. Under RoHS, mercury cannot be present in concentrations of 0.1% by homogenous material in electrical and electronic equipment.   There are a number of exemptions which apply within RoHS, and one of these is the use of mercury in CFLs. This position has been confirmed by the European Committee following a report into their use.   CFLs have been identified as a more efficient method of lighting than tr ...
Major developments in European legislation affecting the electronics industry - what you need to know as a user or producer of electrical and electronic equipment.   If you are a manufacturer and seller of own branded EEE, a reseller under own brand or an importer/exporter of EEE then there are new rules you need to be aware of concerning restricted substances and waste disposal.   On 22nd July 2011, the long-anticipated “RoHS 2” or “RoHS Recast” Directive 201 ...