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hckrdan

Biosensor Array Update

Posted by hckrdan Apr 26, 2011
Greetings,   Here is a quick update on last week's activity on our Biosensor Array project for the GGHC. During our meeting on Saturday (Bill, Drew and myself), we performed the first integrated tests of 2 sensors connected to the same board (EKG and CO2), and we noted good results.      Dan playing biosensor guinea pig at Pumping Station: One on Saturday     This is an update from our side:   We have a functional EKG sensor that I am moving to a proto ...
Tonight I was able to mount the Parallax CO2 sensor and my homemade "flow sensor" on the repurposed respirator mask. The flow sensor is small biscuit fan from an old Sun SCSI tape drive.   To make this all work, I first removed the exhalation cage and its check valve from the mask. Then I removed both input filter cartridges, their sealing gaskets and one of the inhalation checkvalves. I covered the remaining check valve with packing tape. So the subject was breathing too many volatiles fr ...
billmania

Carbon dioxide sensor

Posted by billmania Apr 17, 2011
Basic connectivity I was able to calibrate the carbon dioxide sensor earlier today. In  the process, I also learned that the sensor is much simpler than I  originally thought. For our purposes, the sensor will require a total of  three connections: a common ground a source of between 6 and 12 VDC, at about 150 milliamps an analog sink for between 0 and 4 VDC at very few milliamps of current The 6 to 12 volts enables the onboard sensor heater and the output  signal. ...
This week, I began work on the body temperature sensor.  Since putting the sensor in the user’s mouth would be an annoyance and present a possible choking hazard when performing physical activities, we decided to aim for locating the sensor under the user’s armpit.   We decided, at least for the first release, to go with the  temperature sensor breakout board from Sparkfun Electronics (http://www.sparkfun.com/products/9418).  Its small size will allow us to pl ...
Howdy -   For the Great Global Hackerspace Challenge, our Pumping Station: One team is building a biosensor array. The array consists of sensors placed around one's body connected to an Arduino also attached to the body.  Software running on a computing device like a laptop or smartphone will visualize and log the biosignal data.  We decided the best way to connect the on-body Arduino to the computing device is via Bluetooth.   I'd like to give a brief overview of interf ...
Howdy -   Meet the Pumping Station: One team for the Great Global Hackerspace Challenge:     We're building a biosensor array!  Our team is using our hackerspace's wiki as the primary source for ongoing, day-to-day documentation:   http://wiki.pumpingstationone.org/index.php/Biosensor_Array   And we'll also be making regular posts to this blog to update on our progress and share the DIY techniques we are developing.     Cheers, Drew http://twitte ...
Howdy -   At Pumping Station: One, we're luckly to have several talented photograghers as members.  Here's a flickr photo sets featuring our hackerspace:   Anne Petersen (current President of PS:One) http://www.flickr.com/photos/opacity/sets/72157624089489776/     Kamil Krawczyk http://www.flickr.com/photos/kamil/collections/72157623324601656/     Photo by Anne Petersen     Photo by Kamil Krawczyk   Photo by Anne Petersen   Photo by An ...
ashanan

EKG Circuit Update

Posted by ashanan Mar 31, 2011
When your heart beats, it generates an electrical current, or signal.  The range of that signal can vary from .05 Hz to 150 Hz.  Anything outside of that range isn't coming from your body, so to the first step in building our EKG sensor is to filter out all signals that outside of that range.  We're doing that using two second order Butterworth filters (one high-pass and one low-).  I used this hand dandy online filter calculator to figure out what components I would need. &# ...

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