Life as a Cyborg - Day 2 - I think I broke it

Other posts are here:

Life as a Cyborg - Day 0 - Implantation

Life as a Cyborg - Day 1 - First day out as Transhuman

Life as a Cyborg - Day 2 - I think I broke it  << You Are Here

Life as a Cyborg - Day 3 - Implant Migration

 

In the below video and blog:

Holly gives us her rundown of her first few days as a Cyborg

I misread instructions on how the Dangerous Things app works. (please read the clarification below the video)

We explore the apps I use

I will dive a little into locking bytes.

 

 

 

So... I got the wrong end of the stick in regards to have the Dangerous NFC (BETA) app works.

 

I was under the impression it allowed me to lock the tag and only I can write to it, but this is not quite the case.

The CEO of Dangerous Things responded directly to my youtube video with the following:

Correction in regards to app and the locking mechanism:

Just to clarify how the Dangerous NFC app works - it does not lock the tag, it disables the one-time-programmable lock bytes so it cannot be locked (by accident or maliciously). It also protects the configuration blocks and password block itself. More information on exactly what it does can be found here; https://forum.dangerousthings.com/t/dnfc-and-password-protection

 

The Apps

 

d1.PNG

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.dangerousthings.nfc&hl=en_GB

 

This is the beta version of our Dangerous NFC app for Android. It will ensure your xNT has been protected against accidental locking or malicious attack. It does this by doing the following;

 

1) Analyze the tag to ensure it is set up in a standard configuration and assess risks

 

2) Conform the capability container to latest NFC standard (E1 12 6D 00)

 

3) Lock the capability container against accidental or malicious modification

 

4) Freeze static and dynamic lock bytes on the tag, locking user memory pages in a permanent read/write state

 

5) Set non-default password and password acknowledgement bytes to user defined password

 

6) Write protect configuration bytes against accidental or malicious modification using password protection

 

The app does not yet do any of the following;

 

- Write protect any of the user memory contents, only configuration bytes are protected

 

- Unlock the tag or disable the password

 

- Write any data to the tag (for now use NXP's TagWriter app for this)

 

Now I am out of the heady thrill of day one, I have taken time to read the documentation better and understand the apps purpose a little better.

Instead of "Locking the tag so only I can write to it" the app stops people from setting my tag to read only.
This is VERY important as I can always re-flash my chip with new data, but if some one wanted to flash my chip with a link to, for example, Rick Astley's Never Gonna Give You Up, Then locked my tag to Read Only..... I might have to chop my own hand off.

 

This is a preemptive process to lock your tag to Read / Write and stop the tag being forced into Read Only.

 

st1.PNG

The Dangerous Things Support Tool will collect tag data and report it to Dangerous Things to assist resolving customer support situations. The tool also includes an option to write an empty NDEF record followed by null bytes to the first 10 pages of user writable memory pages. This is something the Android NDEF library has problems doing when tags have been protected by disabling lock bytes with the Dangerous NFC app, therefor all Android applications that use the NDEF library to "factory erase" or "reset" tags also have issues performing this operation. The Dangerous Support Tool does not use this library. It speaks directly to the tag to get things done.

 

The Dangerous Things Support Tool is a stroke of genius, while the community of people with these tags is below 7000, support is still actively available from the creators of the tag.

I have also found their forums and facebook group to be amazing for support.

 

The use case of this support tool is when you have flashed it with new code or commands and it is not doing as intended. Did you flash it right? Are all the sectors responding correctly? Is your formatting correct?

 

Download the tool from the Play Store, give your tag a scan, and it will dump the sectors as below:

 

"[--------------------------Start of Memory Dump--------------------------]

------------------------Sector 0-------------------------

Block 0  8E 02 6F 66 85 08 04 00 62 63 64 65 66 67 68 69  ?.of?...bcdefghi

Block 1  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ................

Block 2  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ................

Block 3  00 00 00 00 00 00 FF 07 80 69 FF FF FF FF FF FF  ......ÿ.?iÿÿÿÿÿÿ

------------------------Sector 1-------------------------

Block 4  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ................

Block 5  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ................

Block 6  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ................

Block 7  00 00 00 00 00 00 FF 07 80 69 FF FF FF FF FF FF  ......ÿ.?iÿÿÿÿÿÿ

------------------------Sector 2-------------------------

Block 8  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ................

Block 9  00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ................

Block 10 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ................

Block 11 00 00 00 00 00 00 FF 07 80 69 FF FF FF FF FF FF  ......ÿ.?iÿÿÿÿÿÿ

------------------------Sector 3-------------------------

Block 12 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ................

Block 13 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ................

Block 14 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00 00  ................

Block 15 00 00 00 00 00 00 FF 07 80 69 FF FF FF FF FF FF  ......ÿ.?iÿÿÿÿÿÿ

------------------------Sector 4-------------------------"

(Sectors shortened for practicality)

 

Then you have the option to send the support info direct to the creators of the chip.

If the chip is at fault, they intend to send you a replacement.

 

Removal and Replacement

If worst comes to worst you can remove the tag, unlike the ones used in animals, the manufacturer does not coat the tags in Biobond or Parylene which would normally help the tags stay put in mans best friend. Humans are more likely to need a replacement due to a miss placed hammer swing or a bad day with the car door where as animals are more active during the encapsulation process and more susceptible to migration.

I will talk more about tag migration in my next blog and video.

 

The process of removal is a little more painful but follows the same process; find a registered body mod expert, poke a hole, press it out.

They can even replace the device at the same time.

 

NEXT BLOG: Life as a Cyborg - Day 3 - Implant Migration