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This is the fourth list in a five part series where we list the Greatest Hits of the Project14 as part of the first Makevember celebration on the element14 community in honor of the third Makevember event.  Makevember is an event that encourages everyone to spend 5 minutes a day working on projects to make things for the fun of it. The idea of a Greatest Hits compilation is borrowed from music.  On a Greatest Hits compilation you'll see 20-25 songs in no particular order and you'll notice a lot of gems missing if you're at all familiar with the artist's work. In the spirit of Makevember its not about whose project is "best", won prizes, and it is not a ranked or ordered list.  It's a celebration of the effort, the learning, the fun, the creativity, the skill, and the entertainment that you have provided to make this program possible.

 

We'll be releasing parts of the 25 52 greatest Hits of Project14 throughout Makevember and by the time we have finished this list, you'll have a representative sample of all the great work that's been done by the community members in support of this program.  The purpose is not to exclude but to celebrate, and the hope is that the 25 52 projects selected are representative of everything that's been going on around here since things got started.

 

Here is the fourth batch (Projects 6-10) of the 25 52 Greatest Hits on Project14:

 

 

The following Greatest Hits have been added to the list:

 

 

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Project 10: Babbages Baggage

Project 10: Babbages Baggage by Workshopshed

Portable Electronics Kit

 

The LuggageThe Luggage is a fictional object that appears in several of the Discworld novels by Terry Pratchett. It is a large chest made of Sapient Pearwood (a magical, intelligent plant which is nearly extinct, impervious to magic, and only grows in a few places outside the Agatean Empire, generally on sites of very old magic, such as Indian burial grounds and ancient monolithic sites). It can produce hundreds of little legs protruding from its underside and can move very fast if the need arises. It has been described as "half suitcase, half homicidal maniac" (Sourcery paperback p22).

 

"Babbages baggage" is Workshopshed 's interpretation of this, perhaps Rincewind travelled through a magic portal to England on one of his adventures and taught Babbage how to make his own version of the chest. For this project he looked at a range of walking robots. There were loads of these and many you could 3D print yourself. They required a lot of servos but they typically had 6 legs which were not enough for him.

 

He went with a giant centipede toys with a load of legs and a remote control.  It was screwed together and came apart really easily. The chest was just the right size for the legs. The mechanics were hidden in the head. Two tiny motors with right angled gearboxes drove two wheels and there were LEDs to indicate that it was turned on. It came with the ability to steer and the centipede could be controlled.

 

The control circuit consists of a Lipo battery, there's no sign of a charger but there is a "special" cable that connects to USB so perhaps there's a small charger in that. The switch simply connects the + of the battery to either the control circuit or to the charging socket. There's an IR photo transistor on the top of the board and an 8 pin chip on the bottom. The chip appears to drive a couple of transistors.

 

Babbages Baggage

"Babbage Baggage, most unique interpretation" - Community Member Judge

 

"Andy's take on this project was a bit different, but I thoroughly enjoyed his project.  A kit that brings your things to you.  Too bad it wasn't a bit bigger to carry more stuff." - Community Member Judge

 

Product Name
giant centipede toys with loads of legs and a remote control
Two tiny motors with right angled gearboxes
LEDs
Lipo battery
IR photo transistor

 

Also on Project14 by Workshopshed

Project 9: Arduino in Test Instrumentation

Project 9: Arduino in Test Instrumentation by jancumps

Open Arduino

 

To extend the capabilities of his lab this member is creating repeatable and automated test setups.  The goal is to control the lab instruments and have all measurements logged to a document. The PSU and scope are programmable, a programmable DC load has been designed, what’s missing is a programmable switch that can be used to turn signals on or off:

 

Arduino in Test Instrumentation

 

 

Product NameQuantity
Arduino Uno1Buy NowBuy Now

 

Product Name
(2) Relay Boards
Labview
Programmable Electronic Load

 

Also on Project14 by jancumps

Project 8: Cyclops-1000: An Electronic Eye for Rotational Speed Measurement

 

Project 8: Cyclops-1000: An Electronic Eye for Rotational Speed Measurement by shabaz

DIY Test Equipment

 

It was clear that there was a lot of interest from the start for DIY Test Equipment from some of our most loyal community members, aka the top members.  Eager to lend a helping hand, shabaz  got this competition started with a bang with his  Cyclops-1000: An Electronic Eye for Rotational Speed Measurement .  The Cyclops-1000 was a near flawless entry and for less than $25 it shows you how you can make your own tachometer.  This handy device can be used for vehicle diagnostics, to check how fast the drill is spinning, and math/physics experiments to see how fast wheels or other parts are spinning. 

 

It also makes a good introduction to understanding the basics of electronics and learning how to solder. The steps and parts you would need to recreate this build are listed.  A Project14 branded (that was super awesome!) was used for the video proof and there are even links to parts you would need to replicate this build.  Following along would give you the chance to work with a microcontroller, a development board, build a circuit, and and the PCB ensures that it can be done by someone with no prior experience with electronics & design projects. You'll gain hands on experience programming a microcontroller and modifying code, a big part of many electronics projects. The end result is an RPM device (tachometer) for measuring the rotational speed of all sorts of machines.

 

 

Cyclops-1000: An Electronic Eye for Rotational Speed Measurement

 

"A very well designed product that borders on being commercial. The target use is broad, lending itself to various applications." - Community Member Judge

 

 

Parts List

Note: A quantity of two parts is needed for some line items! Refer to the first column to see how many references there are to that part, to determine the quantity.

 

Ref
ValueDescription
C1, C7100n100n100nF ceramic capacitor
C2, C31u1u1uF ceramic capacitor
C4, C510u10u10uF electrolytic capacitor
C61n1n1nF ceramic capacitor
D1SD5620-001SD5620-001Honeywell SD5620 optoschmitt detector
D2IR LEDIR LED850nm infrared LED Vishay  VSLY5850VSLY5850
J2DIL headerDIL headeroptional - SMD 10WAY DIL header 1.27mm pitch
LCD12x16 Text LCD2x16 Text LCDMCCOG21605B6W-BNMLWIMCCOG21605B6W-BNMLWILCD
Q1BC547BC547BC547 transistor NPN
R11k1k1k resistor
R222k22k22k resistor
R347R47R47 ohm resistor
R4, R52.2k2.2k2.2k resistor
R647k47k47k resistor
R7180R180R180 ohm resistor
R8330R330Roptional - 330 ohm resistor
SW1Slide SwitchSlide Switchslide switch  OS102011MA1QN1OS102011MA1QN1
SW2Push SwitchPush Switchtactile switch 6.5mm x 4.5mm pin spacing Omron  B3F-1070B3F-1070
U1R-78E5.0-0.5R-78E5.0-0.5Recom R-78E series 5V 500mA DC-DC converter
U2MCP1702-3302EMCP1702-3302E3.3V LDO voltage regulator
U3MSP430G2553MSP430G2553MSP430 series microcontroller  MSP430G2553IN20MSP430G2553IN20
X132.768kHz32.768kHz32.768kHz crystal wire ended, 12.5 pF
MSP-EXP430G2MSP-EXP430G2MSP430 development board
DIP socketDIP socketDIP socket 20-way
EnclosureEnclosure117x79x24mm case with battery holder
PP3 battery clipPP3 battery clip9V battery clip
Proto boardProto boardoptional - 160x100mm perf pad board

 

Also on Project14  by shabaz:

 

 

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Project 7: The Thinking Cap

Project 7: The Thinking Cap  by ntewinkel

Wearable Tech

 

ntewinkel suffers from the occasional trouble of focusing thoughts when trying to get work done.  For example, it's been hard keeping up with all of these element14 challenges, while thoughts were so scattered.  So his wife thought of a solution: The Thinking Cap!  This project has been on their list for quite a few years, as a nice fun thing to create together. The main idea of the build was to have something quite techy/nerdy mad-scientist looking, with lots of wires, circuits, and of course flashing LEDs. The colander makes for the perfect hat-like starting point and provides a really nice silvery electronic-like base.    This was a family project!  Charlie Kat supervised, while Linus (his other cat) stayed safely out of the way in the back window.

 

 

The Thinking Cap

 

 

"This projects is quite different from all the other entries: it is a quirky project, which conjugates technology and creativity, to remind us that working with electronics can also be just for fun!" - Community Member Judge

"This was a fun project that utilised family members and recycled components that embodies the ideology of the Project14 competition." - Community Member Judge

 

 

 

"This project is the testimonial that sometimes a crazy idea needs a cap built thank to a crazy idea. Very appreciated the building with "poor" stuff and a great result. Lights and sounds. Nico should wear his device for his next projects!" - Community Member Judge

"Original and funny.  I am always a fan of that." - Community Member Judge

 

Product NameManufacturerQuantity
micro:bitmicro:bit1Buy NowBuy Now

 

Product Name
Colander
LEDs
Glue Gun

 

Also on Project14 from ntewinkel :

Project 6: Easy Peasy Non-Contact Electricity Detector (Not a Metal Detector)

 

Project 6: Easy Peasy Non-Contact Electricity Detector (Not a Metal Detector) by mahmood.hassan

Electromagnetism

 

Before building this device mahmood.hassan  tried lots of different designs but every circuit had some issues, either with a metal detector or human contact detention (humans are detected as an AC voltage source). He built a separate device for instrumentation amplifier, 2nd order band pass filter and ARM mcu, to do all the math (FFT), so he could only detect AC voltage and not metal detection or human contact detection. After lot of trouble he was able to achieve this by using the following very simple circuit.

 

 

Before beginning his easy peasy electricity detector, he gives a good explanation on the basic functionality of non contact AC voltage detector Whenever there is current flowing through a conductor there is always a magnetic field around it. If the current flowing through the conductor is an AC current then the magnetic field varies periodically according to AC frequency. If we bring another conductor near it, a very small voltage will be induced in it due to electromagnetic induction, which the easy peasy non contact electricity detector will use to detect AC voltage.

 

Easy Peasy Non-Contact Electricity Detector (Not a Metal Detector)

 

 

Also on Project14 by mahmood.hassan:

 

Product Name
AD620

LED with resistor, as an indicator

Multi-turn trim-pot for gain adjustment
±3V supply or 6V&3V supplies
Project 06: Flipping Core Memory Bits Directly With a Magnetic Stylus

Project 06: Flipping Core Memory Bits Directly With a Magnetic Stylus  by abg123

Electromagnetism

 

abg123  has been captivated by magnetism, as he suspects many are, for a long time. His discovery of core memory at the Computer History museum in Mountain View, CA triggered the idea to create a core memory module that is interactive. He discovered Jussi Kilpelainen’s Arduino Core Memory Shield on Tindie and that was the kick he needed. He added an LED array behind the cores to illuminate each core in real time and so he could selectively flip a bit one direction with a stylus (a small screwdriver with a magnet attached). he suspects the presence of the permanent magnet is inhibiting the “destructive read” and/or the follow-up write. The result is only being able to clear the bits at this time. The next step is to create an active stylus to allow me to choose whether I want to set or clear a bit. This will effectively enable drawing AND erasing, to make the project more interactive. Pursuing this next step is going to bring along more learning about magnets and core memory, which is the real goal behind this project. He’ll move on to the electromagnet experiments. One challenge he’ll likely face is the fact the cores are not all arranged in the same orientation. They are placed in an alternating pattern to make the wiring & drive circuitry layout more efficient. If his solution ends up relying on orientation of the stylus relative to the core, He'll have to get extra-clever.

 

Flipping Core Memory Bits Directly With a Magnetic Stylus

 

"Clever and different." - Community Member Judge

"I initially thought Andy had made all the PCB and memory latticework but he was truthful in stating he bought it, which is always appreciated. It didn't really detract from my interest in how he made the pre-bought board into a nice little game with the application of an LED matrix unit. For giving me insight into this board, and the possibilities from it, I have chosen him as my second place." - Community Member Judge

 

 

"Magnetic Stylus, very interesting legacy technology view." - Community Member Judge

Project 07: Pulse Hunter

Project 07: Pulse Hunter by sunnyiut

Back to Analog

 

sunnyiut went back to analog by trying to 'hunt' the 'heart beat pulses' noninvasive using optical method, called PPG [photo plethysmography or light plethysmography]. In keeping with the 'Back to Analog' theme the project was developed using analog modules / components like amplifier ckt. The basic goal of this project was to explore the design considerations of working with transimpedance amplifier which amplifies input current into voltage. Photo plethysmography is a real life practical application of transimpedance amplifier to amplify photodiode signal.  The working principle is pretty simple. A red LED is used to pass light through finger tip and a photodiode is used to receive the reflected light. This contains both the DC and pulse AC components in terms of photo-current. A transimpedance amplifier converts the signal into voltage and amplifies it. Filters are used to get rid of the DC component and the remaining AC component is further amplified to observe using oscilloscope or send to PC using a DAQ system. The PPG signal represents the heart beat, which can be captured at finger tip and takes a small time gap. A simultaneous comparison of ECG and PPG explains the relation and time gap between arrival.

 

"This was a really nice 'old school analog' approach to a new technology project.  Well documented and very interesting." - Community Member Judge

 

"Very analog project, it would have been good to see it on a custom PCB instead of the trainer boards, so that more people can replicate it, because it looks fun!" - Community Member Judge

 

 

 

"Maybe we can say nothing new, but seeing the project description and the demo video, this is not just a test, this is a very nice prototype. Complete and well documented. I should say thank you for the contribution."  - Community Member Judge

 

Also on  Project14  by sunnyiut :

 

 

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Project 08: CVBoard: new way to play with modular synths

Project 08: CVBoard: new way to play with modular synths by costantinorizzuti

Back to Analog

 

 

CVBoard is a board designed to generate two Control Voltage (CV) signals using Arduino.  This prototype from costantinorizzuti goes out to all you analog synths and EuroRack modules enthusiast! The CVBoard has two jack outputs from which it is possible to take the CV signals, driven by Arduino’s digital ports that support Pulse Width Modulation (PWM), and connect it directly to analog synths and EuroRack modules. By this way the board can be connected directly to a modular synth without going through other interfaces. The idea to develop this board was born from the curiosity to experiment how to control with Arduino the oscillator of a Moogerfooger MF102 Ring Modulator pedal using Control Voltage. The board, in fact, was designed to produce two 0-5V variable signals, as required by the Moog standard. To start we have carried out some test using the first prototype made by hand using a stripboard: we tried to control the  frequency of the carrier oscillator of our Moogerfooger.

 

 

 

"CV Board, very interesting mix of analog and digital circuits to make music." - Community Member Judge

"Interesting project, the schematic was a little unconventional and harder to follow, but interesting design!" - Community Member Judge

 

 

"Some great videos that took this analog module and hooked it into some major synth kit. A functional trip straight back to the 80's !" - Community Member Judge

 

 

Also on Project14 by costantinorizzuti

Project 09: Arduino oscilloscope - DIY entry device

Project 09: Arduino oscilloscope - DIY entry device  by idanre1

DIY Test Equipment

 

The big problem with being a maker newbie, is that you have to have equipment.  When idanre1  started, he bought soldering kit and a multimeter - things that don't cost allot and are necessary for you for your first steps. But the most important test equipment is the oscilloscope, and it is also very expensive so he built his own Girinoscope from an instructable.  He'll use an Arduino Nano instead of the Arduino Uno.  All you need for this project is an Arduino, some resisters, and capacitors. For simple testing purposes he used 555 timer with output swing from 0-5v, calculated the expected frequency and tried to match expectations with result samples.  He tweaked the software a little bit to support higher sampling rates (code improvements to save MIPS) He also put the GUI in the same github for ease of access.

 

Arduino oscilloscope - DIY entry device

 

 

Product NameQuantity
Arduino Nano1Buy NowBuy Now

 

Product Name
Resistors
Capacitors
Breadboard

 

Also on Project14 by idanre1:

Project 010: BBC MicroBit Robot Bonanza

 

Project 8: BBC MicroBit Robot Bonanza  by ipv1

Month of Robots

 

It was clear that there was a lot of interest from the start for DIY Test Equipment from some of our most loyal community members, aka the top members.  Eager to lend a helping hand, shabaz  got this competition started with a bang with his  Cyclops-1000: An Electronic Eye for Rotational Speed Measurement .  The Cyclops-1000 was a near flawless entry and for less than $25 it shows you how you can make your own tachometer.  This handy device can be used for vehicle diagnostics, to check how fast the drill is spinning, and math/physics experiments to see how fast wheels or other parts are spinning. 

 

It also makes a good introduction to understanding the basics of electronics and learning how to solder. The steps and parts you would need to recreate this build are listed.  A Project14 branded (that was super awesome!) was used for the video proof and there are even links to parts you would need to replicate this build.  Following along would give you the chance to work with a microcontroller, a development board, build a circuit, and and the PCB ensures that it can be done by someone with no prior experience with electronics & design projects. You'll gain hands on experience programming a microcontroller and modifying code, a big part of many electronics projects. The end result is an RPM device (tachometer) for measuring the rotational speed of all sorts of machines.

 

 

BBC MicroBit Robot Bonanza

"Many small projects to choose from with informative details" - Community Member Judge

"Interesting way to remote control the robot using and lots of detail on the line follower" - Community Member Judge

"I would nominate  BBC Microbit robot bonanza for the grand prize.  I liked the tutorials and the projects can be replicated for little cost by makers, schools and STEM clubs." - Community Member Judge

 

 

"Robot Bonanza, excellent description, HW, SW, Video" - Community Member Judge

"Very cool project showing how to make a remote-controlled robot using a couple of MicroBits." - Community Member Judge

"I always like to see the Microbit being used and this project didn't disappoint, it is well written up and included plenty of 'hacked' together parts." - Community Member Judge

 

Also on Project14  by ipv1: