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(via Jonas Pfeil) Until now, creating a panoramic photograph where each image is taken at the same time requires many cameras in an expensive setup, like how bullet time is captured for the Matrix films. A team from the Technical University of Berlin, lead by Jonas Pfeil, have packed 36 cell-phone cameras into a "throwable" ball.   The user simply throws the ball into the air. An onboard accelerometer will detect when the ball reaches the height of its travel, and a 36 picture, 360 degre ...
  Despite what analysts are saying, jobs for engineers are still a bit scarce. I know a few who have been out of the market for years. Now it is time for these people to "engineer" their way out of the financial hole. Microsoft (MS) is here to help.   With the new "Kinect Accelerator" program, ten groups of people are going to be chosen to build something innovative with the Kinect. Any type of project is acceptable, from gaming to surgery. The ten groups will receive $20,000 USD, var ...
The next-generation iPad will launch in 2012, according to people familiar with developments, who have told the Wall Street Journal that Apple is adding Sharp as a maker of screens used in the popular consumer device. The overriding reason for this is Apple's determination to diversify component suppliers for its products. Sharp's Kameyama No. 2 plant in central Japan will manufacture LCD panels for the new iPad, a source told the publication. Furthermore, the person revealed that Apple is plo ...
Under the UK government's 2011 Cyber Security Strategy there will be an increased focus on cybercrime as well as renewed focus on cyberspace as a stimulant of economic and social prosperity. With new technologies playing an increasingly prominent role in the UK economy, the Strategy is seen as important to helping to create economic expansion. Indeed, the government is charged with the task of balancing the conflicting interests of building a more secure environment and attracting business to ...
The insect UAV? (images via the University of Michigan and Erkan Aktakka)     Insects' worst nightmare is back, the research team from the University of Michigan.   This time Professor Khalil Najafi and his team are harvesting every last bit of energy from their flying friends. Najafi explained their new mission, "Through energy scavenging, we could potentially power cameras, microphones and other sensors and communications equipment that an insect could carry aboard a tiny backp ...
Search engine giant Google has confirmed that it has withdrawn its bid to encourage renewable energy and scrapped its Wikipedia rival Knol. In a blog post, the company said that the decisions are part of its 'spring cleaning' process, introduced by Larry Page, the Co-Founder and new Chief Executive Officer of Google. The 'Renewable Energy Cheaper than Coal (RE<C)' initiative was developed to help cap the cost of renewable energy. But according to Urs Hölzle, the company's Senior Vice-P ...
>Click the image< >Click the image<     It is unfortunate that animals are used for scientific testing. Imagine all the creatures that were needed to test every drug, every medical device, and every implant. There has been much suffering for our benefit.   Take the latest in augmented reality from the University of Washington in Seattle, for example. They used sedated rabbits to test their augmented reality contact lens. If the lens did have issues, the test rabbit ...
It is amazing how little real estate and BOM cost are required to add wireless capabilities to a project.  TI’s CC430 series processors have a fully integrated transceiver, not requiring even external amplifiers or T/R switching.  Only three functions need to be performed between the pins of the IC and the antenna: Impedance Matching - The impedance at the pins of the IC is 86 - j43 ohms at 915MHz.  A matching network is required to get maximum power transfer to and from a ...
(via Priestmangoode)   Accident waiting to happen or innovative idea?   Paul Priestman, director of Priestmangoode, came up with the idea to dock two trains together to move passengers to/from high-speed rail without stopping the whole main train. Everyone travels to their destination faster and the overall system reduces the energy drain on the world, all by not stopping the connecting train. The company boasts that this concept "can potentially revolutionize the rail industry the wa ...
  Tel Aviv University's Department of Physical Electronics' Renewable Energy Center has demonstrated that a tried and true technology can meet or exceed traditional solar collecting panels in producing electricity. Professor Koby Scheuer is using, as he put it, "old school" metallic antennas to collect light based energy. The team's findings were presented at Photonics West earlier this year.   Electromagnetic energy comes in many forms, and they are all present in light. The key to t ...
The manufacturing sector in the UK would benefit enormously from having more engineers and scientists in executive roles. That is the view of Sir James Dyson, the eponymous billionaire creator of the bagless vacuum cleaner, who has called for a march of the scientists and engineers through boardrooms in Britain. As he launched a £1.4 million professorship at Cambridge University, Sir James claimed that the academic status of inventors is not mirrored in the executive world. His peers, the ...
Even though it faces intense competition in the lucrative smartphone market, the new Samsung Galaxy Nexus gives consumers plenty of reasons to feel excited. While the manufacturer of the new handset - being billed as Google's next flagship phone - have yet to confirm its launch date, pre-production reviews of the device are overwhelmingly positive. More specifically, the handset boasts impressive hardware and software, while it also features on-screen buttons, one of the hallmarks of Google's ...
Test setup (via Aalto University)   Aalto University in Finland researchers have their hearts in the right place, but their minds focused in the wrong market. In efforts  to bring smartphones to power restrictive countries and people, the researchers have cut the power consumption to 3g based smartphones by up to 74%, they claim.   Professor Jukka Manner explained the goal, "This new solution is particularly valuable in developing countries because it provides significantly more ...
Toyota Professor of Materials Science and Engineering Caroline Ross (via MIT & Allegra Boverman)   Developments in photonics show the near-future possibility of a complete replacement in digital technology. Fibre optics has been the backbone of communication for decades. Light based interconnects are poised to replace wires at the chip level. Now, researchers at MIT have conquered an important hurdle when it comes to creating an all-optical  chip, the diode.   Currently, ligh ...
Terahertz modem next to a 10 yen coin. (Via Rohm Semiconductors)   The terahertz waves in industry sit between 100GHz and 10THz. The equipment needed to operate in those heights is large and expensive, but give a bandwidth of 0.1Gbps. This was top of the line until Rohm Semiconductors came out of nowhere touting speeds of 1.5Gbps in the 300GHz band. The 2cm by 1cm device, with an integrated antenna adapter, is the smallest ever made for this level of wireless  communication.   ( ...
Jame Hickman, lead researcher. (via University of Central Florida)   Like bioware from some cyberpunk novel, University of Central Florida (UCF) researchers push ever closer to a "human-on-a-chip." The team's first step to making this a reality was completed by growing a neuromuscular junction between muscle and spinal cord using stem cells. The goal is to eventually create a system that interconnects tiny versions of human organ in the exact way the body operates, which sounds grot.   ...
He spent decades claiming that he would forever avoid the technology sector, but last week legendary US investor Warren Buffett confirmed that Berkshire Hathaway, the investment company he chairs, has acquired a significant stake in International Business Machines (IBM). The news surprised investors on Wall Street and prompted people within the technology world to ask why Mr Buffett had chosen to plough $11 billion of Berkshire's money into the firm. Why, after years of insisting that he would ...
Google+, the social networking site launched earlier this year by the US-based search engine giant, has been struggling to build on its early success. This is according to  new data from Experian Hitwise, which said the new site is "losing millions of visitors". Launched to existing Google users by invite-only in June, Google+ was billed as a social network to rival Facebook, which has more than 800 million active users. And shortly after it was fully opened in September, data suggested ...
Spring Garden Street Mint building. (Via Steven A. Ives 2007)   This is a rhetorical question, but has your company taken the time and steps needed to be a bit more on the environmentally friendly side? In an effort to adopt some sustainability practices, the U.S. Mint is will be following the new ISO 50001 standards to curb its energy usage by 5% over five years. The rule book should give the Mist plenty of ideas and regulations to meet their goals rather quickly. The plan is scheduled t ...
AR lens in a rabbit's eye. (Via Institute of Physics)   Augmented Reality will be a pervasive part of our lives in days to come. How it will be delivered is up in the air. The University of Washington in Seattle is taking it straight to the concealed level with a set of contact lenses.   The current prototype only displays one pixel, but how it lights up that transparent sapphire square is the real technology. Within the Fresnel lens is a 5 meter long antenna tuned to the gigahertz ba ...
Engineering students spend more of their time studying and the less on outside activities, according to the annual National Survey of Student Engagement, which seeks to measure how hard, and how effectively, students are working. Based on a questionnaire of more than 400,000 undergraduates, all of them freshmen or seniors, at nearly 700 colleges and universities in the US, the results revealed that student engineers are the most diligent demographic. It found that would-be engineers work si ...
Intel has announced that it has developed an accelerator chip capable of running at a speed of one teraflop, which is equal to one trillion calculations per second. Dubbed Knights Corner, the capability of the new chip was demonstrated using a test machine at the SC11 supercomputing conference in Seattle. The manufacturer explained that the Knights Corner chip acts as a co-processor, assuming responsibility for some of the most complicated tasks from the computer's central processing unit. To ac ...
Krishna Naishadham (left) and Xiaojuan Song (Right) holding components of their printed sensor. (Via Georgia Institute of Technology)   Some create explosives meant to harm, while others build devices to stop them.   Krishna Naishadham and Xiaojuan Song have developed an inexpensive wireless bomb detection sensor that is sure to keep many safe. The two Georgia Institute of Technology researchers joined forces to build a low-cost paper-like wireless sensor and communication device usin ...
a. MIM withe suface plasmon excitation. b. Without. c. (Black) Photocurrent with surface plasmons. (Red) Without. (Via Melosh ad Wang with the American Chamical Society.)     Solar cells the only game in town? Stanford University's Fuming Wang and Nicholas Melosh may be bringing something different to the game of light to electricity.   Converting light into electricity is nothing new. Photovoltaic (PV) solar cells, solar-thermal collectors and rectannas (Microwave energy to DC) ...
FXI TECH Cotton Candy USB stick sized computer. (via FXI TECH)   Bill Gates predicted, back in 2001, that tablets would be the most popular platform in America. He was right. He claimed that the portability of taking one's desktop anywhere was essential. He also stated that a future Windows version would allow access to the same desktop on any client in the world. This claim, although needed, is still far away from the mainstream.   The Norway based company FXI TECH is attempting to f ...
  It is one of those innovations that appear so obvious in hindsight, IBM is poised to release their Ivy Bridge 3D processor that is powered and cooled via liquid metal. IBM's Bruno Michel leads the research in what he believes will address many issues, mainly reducing the power needed to cool systems.   Two fluid networks of vanadium drive the processor. The concept takes many silicon wafer layers and stacks them on each other sandwiching the fluid networks in between. The liquid met ...
In response to intense pressure being applied by officials in Nebraska and restive environmental activists, the Obama administration has announced that it intends to review the route of the controversial Keystone XL oil pipeline. By doing so, the administration has effectively postponed any decision about the pipeline's fate until after next year's Presidential Election. Measuring 1,379 miles long, the US section of the pipe is meant to run through Buchanan, Clinton, as far as Doniphancountie ...
It may well be just about the thinnest product found in the ultra-competitive smartphone market, but the new Motorola Droid RAZR certainly does not fall flat. While rival manufacturers Apple and Samsung offer some impressively-compact models, the new handset from Motorola can more than hold its own. The handset is, in fact, a mere 0.38 inches thick, meaning it is smaller than an old-fashioned US postage stamp. Despite this, Motorola insists that it is suitably sturdy due to the fact that it fe ...
Cabe Atwell

Engineering on Friday

Posted by Cabe Atwell Nov 18, 2011
- Click the comic for a better view -   In an MIT-Harvard joint effort, a single human synapse was forged into an IC package. Read more here. Cabe ...
      Inside the EPIC button sensor. Shows an array of 16 sensors. (Via Plessey Semiconductors)     On December 21, 2010 in Plymouth, England, Plessey Semiconductors signed a license agreement with the University of Sussex to develop EPIC, or Electric Potential Integrated Circuit Censors, a sensor capable of "reading a heart beat through a wall." The research team at University of Sussex is being lead by Professor of sensor technology Robert Prance, had been in developm ...
New Energy Technologies speed bump.   New Energy Technologies (NET) in Maryland have created a speed-bump devise that can harvest kinetic energy from vehicles and convert that energy into electricity.  NET has been testing this technology for over a year and has “test bumps” in places like Roanoke, Virginia at a Civic Center and Hillside, New Jersey at a Burger King.  New Energy would eventually like to see its MotionPower Express devices at all areas where traffic, go ...
Don't get the wrong idea, I had a lot of information when making the move to full-time consulting.  I read article after article about how to be a great consultant and I spoke to many friends who had already made the leap.  I had both the technical experience and soft skills required to at least give it a shot.  However no matter how much I read or listened, there was going to be PLENTY I didn't know or understand, making for several surprises and lessons down the road.   Man ...
Graphical depiction of the battery anode layers (left) Harold Kung (right)   While working with battery technology, Northwestern University Professor Harold Kung has come up with a novel configuration for lithium batteries that yield 10 times the capacity with a tenth of the charge time versus industry standard. The development is an elegant mix of old and new that   The research team took the concept of a graphene based anode and combined it with the old tried and true silicon. Graph ...
Analog IC that mimics a single synapse (via Guy Rachmuth and MIT)   Modeling the human brain into a usable computer is the basis for much research to date. IBM is attempting to build a computer system that rivals the human mind through brute force, one for one, copying the 100 billion neurons and 100 trillion synapses. Statistically so, the computer will be similar, but could it learn like a brain?   MIT and Harvard have modeled a new IC to follow how the brain learns. In the team's c ...
Authorities in the US and Estonia have confirmed that they have cracked one of the largest internet fraud schemes the world has ever witnessed. It has been reported that the scheme infected more than four million computers with malware, redirecting users to websites that generated at least $14 million in fraudulent advertising fees. The US Justice Department said that the arrests marked the end of a two-year international investigation, which authorities labelled Operation Ghost Click. Explai ...
Next month will inevitably see a spike in sales of smartphone and tablet devices as consumers rush to snap up the handsets in time for Christmas. Despite it being a lucrative period for smartphone suppliers there is a certain lack of holiday spirit among the world's technology giants as lately the battle for market supremacy in smartphones has turned rather nasty, with patent lawsuits being filed in various courtrooms around the world. The lawsuits and countersuits involve all of the biggest ...
(Via Andrew Bragdon and Microsoft)   "It's true, Apple caught us all napping. It launched something that was very iconic, new and unseen with a very good user interface." - Microsoft UK Head of Mobility Phil Moore (December 2009)   Only a few years later Microsoft (MS) returns and innovates past the small screen with Microsoft Surface, Windows Phone, Windows 8, and into the third dimension with Kinect. The potential of all their innovations is still anchored in research. Surface is no ...
Amazon has quietly made what could prove to be a significant move by acquiring a new company focused on text-to-speech technology, as it seeks to overthrow the market domination of Apple. Presently, Apple uses the Siri system for its iOS, which helps to run iPhones and iPad devices. Siri, a company that developed a compelling voice-operated personal assistant app for the iPhone, was acquired by Apple in 2010. Following the acquisition the US-based technology giant promptly cancelled all plans ...
When early radio experiments demonstrated wireless communication over a few meters it seemed like magic.  People’s first reaction was to suspect there was a hidden wire running between the transmitter and receiver.  (Check out Thunderstruck by Erik Larson, which conveys the amazement of the wireless during the early efforts to commercialize it and how it caught the public’s imagination when it was used to apprehend a famous murder suspect.)  It seemed just a magical to ...
Technology firms around the world are desperate to create a device that will allow them to compete with Apple's iPhone and iPad devices, which have captured the public's imagination and set trends in the industry. Samsung, for its part, has invested enormous amounts of money trying to create a handheld device to knock Apple off its lofty perch.   However, the firm has come up short thus far, consistently being outgunned by Apple. Now, though, it may have created a new device that could hel ...
Cabe Atwell

The 2D semiconductor

Posted by Cabe Atwell Nov 14, 2011
2D circuit photographs and bandgap chart. (via the group's report on Nano Letter.)     So thin that they call it two dimensional, researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, has developed a new class of semiconductor. Quantum confinement is at the heart of the development, where the electrical and optical properties of an unconfined bulk semiconductor change as the size is reduced. The biggest benefit of the discovery comes in the fact the conductors can be applied to any ...
Flexible electrode array. (Via Travis Ross and Yun Soung Kim, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign)   Better than a bolt in the head, a flexible brain implant allows for the monitoring of brain activity much finer than alternatives today. In an effort to monitor and eventually control the effect of seizures, the membrane circuit was constructed to gather the most information possible on a wider area of the brain. The project's lead author Jonathan Viventi Ph.D., explained, "This technolo ...
  A person considered to be in a vegetative state quietly lays in a hospital, motionless. Past thinking had everyone to believe this person is not conscious, barely living. Adrian Owen, from the University of Western Ontario, disagrees. Owen explained, "There's a man here who technically meets all the internationally agreed criteria for being in a vegetative state, yet he can generate 200 responses with his brain. Clearly, this guy is not in a true vegetative state. He's probably as conscio ...
Final  graphene material (left). Magnified transistor image (center).  Transistors placed onto a balloon. (right) (Via Lee, American Chemical  Society)   There appears to be legions of engineers and scientists pushing hard for stretchable electronics.  The latest comes in the form of a transparent material containing sets  of graphene transistors. Up to a 5% flex could be achieved before  degradation of the electrical qualities.   In an effort that spans ...
Aside from a focus on the finer details of the economy, few things cause more debate in British politics than the education system. For year after year, record numbers of children aged between 16 and 18 years achieve top grades in their GCSE and A-level exams - nation exams set at 16 and 18 years-old - and yet universities complain about a lack of basic skills in large numbers when they begin their degrees. With this tension between the two hierarchies of British education, it came as no surpr ...
Virgin Galactic, a group within Richard Branson's Virgin Group, has moved a step closer to sending regular (albeit wealthy) citizens into space. That's because the firm has confirmed that Keith Colmer, a former US Air Force test pilot, will be one of the astronaut pilots to help carry tourists on suborbital space flights. In a statement, Virgin Atlantic confirmed that Mr Colmer will work alongside chief pilot David Mackay to take people into the cosmos. Mr Colmer boasts combat and test fligh ...
Despite dominating the PC market with its Windows operating system and Office products, Microsoft has been unable to gain a foothold in the smartphone sector. Its Windows 7 operating system only featured on 5.6 percent of the smartphones used by US subscribers over the age of 13 (compared to 44.8 percent for Google and 27.4 percent with Apple) in the three months to September. With around 117 million smartphone units sold across the world in the last quarter alone, the market is lucrative for co ...
In a vote of 52 to 46, the US Senate has blocked the attempts by internet service providers (ISP) to stop "Net Neutrality" laws to take effect. What does this mean? It means that there is nothing done in data communication will be restricted by the whim of ISP and wireless companies.   There are many instances where an ISP will block or charge for certain functionality on the internet for its subscribers. Common issues come in the form of blocking competitor's websites, limiting peer-to-pe ...
Organic electrochemical transistor, cotton substrate, demonstrating a simple LED lighting operation. (via Cornell University)   The cotton substrate based organic electrochemical transistor and the organic field-effect  transistor were created for two purposes, to be flexible and comfortable to wear. Is this a better solution to flextronics?   Cotton is not a good conductor. However, the researchers at Cornell University lead by Professor Juan Hinestroza changed this by applying ...
"Roots" by Don Satalic (via donsatalic.com)   We all go to school with the hopes of landing the perfect job right after. We all start somewhere and try to navigate to the goal. However, through a circuitous path we often end up at a place we never imagined winding up.   Perhaps it is a sign of the times, but I know a Phd nuclear scientist who is a manager at a Walmart, an EE who drives a high-school bus, and a mainframe programmer and software designer who is an ironworker. All of whi ...
  "Design something that solves a problem." - the mission of the James Dyson Award.   The James Dyson award is an international competition geared towards college students and new graduates, spanning 18 countries with up to 9 entries each. The effort is to encourage "the next generation of design engineers to be creative, challenge, and invent." The final winner receives £10,000, along with smaller prizes on its way to the end.   The 2011 James Dyson award winner comes from ...
Reprogrammable cell computer model (Via University of Nottingham)   Is it playing god or making the right tool for the job?   The University of Nottingham (UN) is attempting to create "re-programmable cells" in hopes of changing the synthetic biology industry. With each necessary task, a synthetic life-form is created. These cells are altered and coaxed into working outside its own nature. An example being the cold-water hydrocarbon-eating bacteria called Corexit from BP and Exxon use ...
Flexible electronics (flex circuits) is science fiction becoming reality. Traditionally, just electrical components attached to a flexible substrate, and not quite the paper thin electronic newspaper many dream of. Recent research is attempting to push towards that concept and make the circuitry flex with the substrate. The main issue that has held back progress in this area comes from how the integrated components effect each other as the substrate bends. As the circuit flexes the components ge ...
  New Tech Press Managing Editor Joe Basques interviews Jean Labrosse on the RTOS company's new relationship with Newark/Element14, and Micrium's climbing status among engineers, according to the UBM/EETimes Embedded Market Survey ...
As soon as I locked in my move from Ithaca, NY to Denver I signed up for Sparkfun's Open House; five months in advance of the 10/22/11 event date.  And like always, the folks at Sparkfun did not disappoint.  It was a carnival for engineering-types!  They had good food, bouncy castles, a juggler, booths like 'Ask and Engineer' and 'craft table', plus an expo where people from the community could show off their projects. Being immediately drawn to the area where people had all kinds ...
Alix Paultre, Design Group editorial director at Advantage Business Media, interviewed element14's Jeff Jussel about critical challenges to the engineer throughout the design process. element14 recently released a study that revealed several pain points among engineers – increasing time pressures, incomplete/inaccurate information from relevant sources, and difficulty comparing options. Additional findings included info on things like a majority of respondents citing the earlier stages of ...
  Using similar principles of machine-vision on the assembly line, Simicon plans to ruin our day on the open road. Their new system, Cordon, monitors four lanes of traffic with up to 32 vehicles in its viewing range and delivers an array of information. All targets are targeted in a wide-angle  picture with their license plates clearly visible in a close up. Of course, speed of each object is recorded.   This is not the end of its tracking capabilities. It can detect when a vehic ...
This summer at ESC Chicago Marlow Industries had a display of their thermal engergy harvesting module prototypes in which an energy harvester powered a clock using the heat from a small space heater.  Marlow is releasing these products to production and making them available in single-piece quantities for $295.  (To see another example of thermoelectric harvesting, Jeri Ellsworth has a very brief demo of running an HP16C of heat from her body at the very end of her video on energy harv ...
pjclarke

VHDL v Verilog

Posted by pjclarke Nov 7, 2011
So having explained what a FPGA is I guess the next step for anyone wanting to learn more is which language to use? Should you select a Altera or Xilinx chip? This is where you may find yourself in the middle of many arguments and views as to which is the best, and the choice is typically a personal one.   VHDL was the first to come alone in 1980 and stands for ‘VHSIC Hardware Description Language’ (VHSIC stands for Very High Speed Integrated Circuits. No wonder we just call it ...
  Michael Faraday proposed the idea of a function describing the amount of light fairing through every point in space in his 1846 paper "Thoughts on Ray Vibrations." Alexander Gershun coined the phrase Light Field, in his paper on radiometric properties of light in three-dimensional space in 1936. Building on the shoulders of these giants, light-field photography was born. The concept is a photograph that takes in all the light in a scene which could be focused anywhere in the image at a la ...
  There is a concept in a new-product introduction, "if you do not look good using it, it will not catch on." At first, I thought the Ryno Motors's motorized unicycle was a little silly, but after seeing the promotional pictures with the industrial background, I slightly changed my mind.     The unicycle, dubbed the Ryno, acts like something in between a motorcycle and a Segway. The electric motor powered cycle self balances on one axis, but side to side is still controlled by ...
Professor Holger Hermanns and the wireless brake system (via Saarland University)   What is 99.999999999997 safe and has a 250 milli-second delay? It is the wireless bicycle brake from Saarland University. Professor Holger Hermanns, lead designer on the project, had this to say about the reliability, "... out of a trillion braking attempts, we have three failures. That is not perfect, but acceptable."   With pressure sensors in the bicycle's grips, the rider has to just squeeze. The s ...
Magnetic layers with insulator showing the tunneling magneto thermoelectric voltage (Via PTB)   MRAM (Magnetic RAM) may soon be the coolest memory ever made. Researchers from the Physical and Technical Institute (PTB) of Braunschweig, Germany discovered a way for computers to actually use wasted energy/heat to power itself while maintaining a low operating temperature,  dubbed “tunnel magneto thermoelectric voltage." In the magnetic tunnelling structure, of MRAM or hard drive hea ...
Research team: Cynthia Breazeal (far left), David DeSteno (right) and Paul Harris (far right) with the dragon robot. (Via Northwestern University. Photo by Christopher Huang.) Teachers are always looking for new, exciting and innovative ways to make learning fun.  In that spirit of thinking, researchers at Northeastern University, MIT and Harvard have created a snuggle appropriate robotic dragon that will help in the learning process.  The dragon will soon be used in a test preschoo ...
General Motors (GM) teaches us about, while promoting, their new permanent magnet (PM) electric motor. Forcing out 114 hp (85 kE) of torque, the new motor is set to be central to the Chevrolet Spark electric vehicle coming out in 2013. Of course, the full 114 hp will not be completely sustained during all operations, only about 75 hp can be maintained. However, peak power is available when the motor starts up, delivering instant torque.   A permanent magnet motor does not have a field wind ...
  A small, palm sized, robot has finished what few humans have, the Ironman Triathlon. The Evolta robot crossed the finish line on October 30, 2011 at 10:56am. The race consists of running, bicycling, and swimming near Kailua-Kona, Hawaii. A time limit of 168 hours was placed on the Evolta robot, and it came in almost splitting hairs at 166 hour and 56 minutes. Evolta did it all with 3 rechargable "EVOLTA AA" batteries, while only taking periodic breaks to recharge the cells. A testament to ...

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