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User controlling quadcoptor with an EEG interface (via Zhejiang University)   Those who have difficulty moving may soon have help they can control. Researchers, led by Gang Pan, from Zhejiang University’s Pervasive Computing Group at CCNT Lab have designed a way of controlling a quadcopter with the mind without being a Jedi. The research group’s goal is to give the handicapped the ability for increased interactivity with their environments. Known as the ‘FlyingBuddy2’ ...
Freescale capacitive touch panels and dev-board (via Freescale)   Freescale has been pioneering work in the semiconductor industry for more than 50 years now. Once a division of Motorola, Freescale delivered the world's first high powered germanium transistor used mostly for car radios. That started their streak of new and innovative inventions for years to come. Investing more than $780 million a year to research and development, Freescale has components in electronics we use nearly every ...
SamKavanagh

Something bigger

Posted by SamKavanagh Aug 31, 2012
With the blink of an eye the final days of prep have come to a close and race day is only hours away. All has gone according to plan thus far as training goes. I have remained healthy,the efforts have been completed and banked;now all I can do is execute my game plan as I have trained,and let the clock draw the conclusions. Since arriving here in the village everything has become a bit of blur you could say. Meals are like taking a trip around the world both by the variety of food to the sea of ...
DIY Spectrometer prototype (via PublicLab & Kickstarter)   Have you ever wanted to figure out exactly what minerals and chemicals are in your drinking water? Or maybe you are wondering what exactly justifies the hundred-dollar bottle of wine compared to the yellow tail. One of the most accurate methods to answering these questions is by spectrometry, where one can identify unknown substances by analyzing the light they absorb.     Spectrometers can cost thousands of dollars ...
Bio-Scaffold image (via Charles M. Lieber, Daniel S. Kohane, & Harvard)   Everybody remembers the scene in Terminator 2 where Arnold rips the cyborg skin from his arm, that day is almost here (the cyborg skin that is), according to some scientists from Harvard university. The science team developed the ‘cyborg’ tissue, outlined in a recently released paper entitled ‘Macroporous nanowire nanoelectronic scaffolds for synthetic tissue’, by embedding 3D nanoscale wir ...
Cyber-warfare? (via In-yeop hwang - fileshare)   DARPA has announced its holding their ‘Plan-X Proposers Day’ conference to hear ideas concerning technology/software that could change US cyber-warfare implementation. With the emergence of new viruses capable of causing network obliteration (like the Stuxnet or Flame viruses), the US needs a way to keep their networks secure from enemy threats as well as initiate offensive tactics, which DARPA states ‘are needed to dominate ...
"Glove Tricorder" prototype (via Med Sensation)   So it’s not exactly similar to the Power Glove  (anyone remember Nintendo’s disastrous peripheral ), but it may put the power in medical worker's hands. An off-shoot of Singularity University’s graduate studies program, known as Med Sensation, has unveiled their prototype electronic glove for medical study and examination.   The Glove Tricorder utilizes a series of sensors that include accelerometers, temperatur ...
RWAM in action (via National Taiwan University)   The 800 photoreceptive lenses coalesce the scene into one panoramic image as the monsters wings flutter in the California sun. The beast is on the hunt looking to lay its eggs in a pristine setting of idyllic farmland where its larva will systematically kill every last crop leaving nothing in its wake, if left unchecked. The monster in question is the oriental fruit fly, and it can, and will, destroy billions of dollars’ worth of agric ...
Usain Bolt, Michael Phelps and the rest may well have left London behind some time ago, but the spirit of the Olympic Games is alive and kicking in Bristol, in south-east England. That's because the city is currently hosting 26 teams from various locations around the world for the purpose of the FIRA RoboWorld Cup. The innovative event will see robots participate in a broad range of events, including football and basketball. RoboWorld Cup has been a regular event in the technology world, bu ...
Flexible battery prototype (via KAIST)   Breaking or cracking displays can thoroughly ruin a device. Bendable displays like those in e-readers have been successfully manufactured but, until now, batteries have always remained a rigid component of circuitry holding back the pliability of our gadgets. Professor Keon Jae Lee, of the Korean Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, has figured out a way to produce ultra thin, rechargeable and flexible lithium ion batteries (LIBs) that main ...
Bioimpedance prototype setup (via USENIX)   In a world where we are continuously using more electronic devices, it is becoming increasingly more common to see people using tech to help monitor their health and fitness levels. Some devices used are capable of storing your personal data or uploading the data collected to a database. However, no device currently available possess the ability to recognize its users on its own.     In order to eliminate the burden of keeping track o ...
Cao Gadgets Wireless Sensor Tag (via Cao Gadgets)   Tired of losing your TV remote, car keys or mobile phone? Or perhaps you’re looking for a motion/temperature sensor to monitor your fridge door or to keep tabs on the temperature inside so your cheese doesn’t go bad? Now you can do that and more with Cao Gadgets Wireless Sensor Tags. They can be placed or affixed to just about anything or anywhere, track everything.   The device was designed using a digital 3D magnetometer ...
Wifi connected car concept (via USDOT)   Our cars don't have to fly, but they should at least drive themselves. It's been a science fiction staple, time to become reality. The University of Michigan’s Transportation Research Institute has launched their year-long test of their ‘Safety Pilot Model Deployment’ as part of the US Department of Transportation’s Safety Pilot Programmed aimed at reducing the number of traffic-related accidents.   UM’s system u ...
Aerofex test flight of their "Hover-bike" (via Aerofex)   Aerofex’s conceptual prototype hover-bike has been in development since 2008, and the company has recently released a couple of YouTube videos of their ‘test-bed vehicle’ (so new it does not even have a name yet) to showcase the bikes ‘proof-of-flight’. Their design features 2 ducted fans to generate lift as well as drive with the driver providing yaw and pitch to maintain balance (much like a motorcycle ...
Charles Gervasi

Engineering Hero

Posted by Charles Gervasi Aug 27, 2012
Neil Armstrong’s death this weekend reminds me of the intangible power of human spaceflight.  When my wife and I heard the news on Saturday, we decided we wouldn’t mention it our kids, who are 4 and 2, until we opened the newspaper on Sunday.  Armstrong and a few other astronauts are the only people famous for an achievement in the 60s that our kids would we even know of.  Part of it because we are geeks who read them stories about engineering, but it’s also that ...
(a & b) Concept and prototype (c & d) Microscope images of material composite (via Georgia Tech & NANO Letters)   The idea of converting the energy used when walking to electricity has travelled through my mind, as I am sure it has through many of yours. The question is first, how to generate it, and then how can we store it? A group of researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology in Atlanta Georgia have essentially answered both of those questions using one device: a p ...
(a) nanostructure base image (b) metal is added to the nano-structure, colours observed (c) enlarged image of the eye's corner (via A*STAR & Nature Technology)   Researchers from A*STAR's Institute of Materials Research and Engineering in Singapore have developed an innovative new way to create images in a much higher resolution. Current laserjet and inkjet printers can produce images in full color at up to 10,000 dots per inch (dpi). The researchers claim that their new method would h ...
Our old friend, the Ethernet cable   The IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) has recently announced that their looking to create an Ethernet standard regarding data-transfer speeds between 400Gps and 1Tbps. In order to create this standard the IEEE recently formed the "802.3 Industry Connections Higher Speed Ethernet Consensus group" to mull over current trends and future forecasts regarding increased bandwidth speeds including the probability that these speeds will rea ...
Test setup and system (via Liquidware)   Ok, so maybe you might not want to risk shark infested waters, but what if you had a alert system? It’s more of a ‘proof-of-concept,’ but engineers from Liquidware have designed a laser shark intrusion system that alerts you via Twitter when it’s been tripped (giving you just enough time to turn around to face what’s about to eat you). The engineers designed their intrusion system using a Bosch laser-light level (used in ...
(via IBM, ETH Zurich & Nature)   IBM and ETH Zurich have taken a critical step towards bringing us spintronics. Current computing technology uses charge of electrons to encode and process data. Spintronics is a computing technology that uses the spin of an electron to store, transfer, and process information. If successful, spintronics would create a new class of semiconductor transistors which would result in much more energy efficient computing products.     Up until rece ...
  The UK government has been implored to harness the talents of people with skills relevant to the science, engineering and technology industries, which are critical to the long-term future of the economy. The call has come from Education for Engineering (E4E), an industry body, which has argued that more students should be encouraged to study these subjects in higher education.   As things stand, E4E said, the British economy risks failing behind its rivals on the Continent and else ...
SamKavanagh

Playing Bikes

Posted by SamKavanagh Aug 22, 2012
Playing Bikes Today is day 1 here in the UK.  Upon arrival it was a rush of activity collecting baggage,authorizing accreditations,and then off on a road trip to Newport:our home for the next week.   Last Friday was my final hard day of training state side and now it is time to put the polish on. I am excited to have these few days with just the cycling team so that we can all bond a bit before the chaos of the village hits. I am so honored to be amongst them all,and riding along sid ...
Wardenclyffe plant designed by architect Stanford White   Back in 1898 Nikola Tesla (father of wireless power, alternating current and pretty much everything else electronic) wanted to provide wireless power to the world and began planning the construction of the Wardenclyffe facility located in Shoreham Long Island, New York. Construction of the plant began in 1901 (with an initial grant from lawyer/banker James S. Warden) and was funded by industrialists, venture capitalists and a sizabl ...
The technical fields have a problem in the training of the next generation of students: internet censorship.  It represents a hesitation in the move from information being something that can be controlled to the free passing of ideas, and it places education in direct conflict with the demands of industry.   There are two ways I've seen internet controlled by high schools during my involvement with the BlueStamp Engineering program: White list: Administrators decide on the sites tha ...
Drifting 32,000 feet up in the air is a bit of a norm for me. This time,however, my destination is anything but normal. I am about to play bikes on the biggest stage of my life. I have been boiling over with excitement for the Paralympics ever since joining my teammates in a hotel room in Carson,CA to watch the Olympic’s Opening Ceremonies. The images of athletes walking into the stadium and later competing in front of the world snapped the blurry image of just what I had accomplished with ...
  Sometimes the deluge of digital content spurrs a fondness to touch paper, objects, or the real-physical world. This is no exception.     With this in mind, after its announcement back in November, the Berg miniature printer has spurred quite a bit of uncontrollable excitement. The British design consultancy firm Berg is using their new product to engage people with technology from a different approach. The printer uses cheap inkless receipt paper to print its news feed and can ...
(Left) Concept/Prototype shirt (Right) Material showing a change in resistance when stretched (via ElectricFoxy)   Pilates is a physical fitness regimen that is practiced throughout the world with over 11 million in the United States alone (with over 14,000 trainers). The routine helps build lean muscles along with strength and endurance. However, some may be performing these stretching exercises all wrong which could actually wind up hurting you in the long-term instead of helping you. In ...
  A new report, produced by the Independent Commission on Fees, has confirmed that the total number of university applicants has fallen by as much as 8.8 percent since the introduction of higher fees. This is equivalent to a 37,000 fall on the figures from 2010-11.   Under the new tuition fees system, as much as £9,000 per year could be charged to people wanting to pursue their education. The decision to increase the cost of tuition fees caused controversy in the UK, with a larg ...
“The envelope, please”.   Unlike the Oscars at the Makey awards you are not likely to hear Tom Cruise or Julia Roberts utter this phrase before announcing the winners. And there probably won’t be an accountant from Price Waterhouse Coopers overseeing the voting tabulation, nor a walk down the red carpet past Joan Rivers nor celebrity mingling at a Vanity Fair magazine party afterward.  Still, we’re going to be really excited  when the MAKE Magazine Indust ...
TakkTile (via Harvard Biorobotics)   Harvard's biorobotics team has been creating some fascinating products lately. They created a robotic arm which is much more economical and durable than most. Another project they have been working on involves Freescale Semiconductor's MPL115A2. The device is a tiny digital barometer which the department plans to use as the heart of their TakkTile open-source boards.     The first of the TakkTile boards come in an array structure. As a resul ...
3D Scan of a rabbit statue (via Entire Shape Acquisition Technique Using Multiple Projectors and Cameras with Parallel Pattern Projection)   Scanning a 3D object is nothing new. Scanning while that object is moving is a task still in its infancy. Some first steps may have been taken. Researchers from AIST (Advanced Industrial Science and Technology) in Japan, with cooperation from researchers at Kagoshima and Hiroshima Universities, have developed a method of accurately measuring 3D object ...
Promotional image. Solar gets another boost. (via University of Totonto)   In the improvement of solar technology, it is all about the small details. Tiny increases in efficiency shrinking the size and price of each panel and making sure all the nooks are made absorbent and conductive for tiny photons and electrons.     An international team of researchers led by University of Toronto Engineering Professor Ted Sargent, have just made their CQD or colloidal quantum dot solar cel ...
About a year ago I wrote about claims of health risks associated with wireless technology.  These claims have come to my home town in the form of opposition to the deployment of wireless water meters.    To find out if there was anything to the opposition, I contacted Dr. Maria Powell, a vocal opponent of my city’s plan to deploy wireless metering.  She sent me some papers on the possible hazards of RF energy.    The papers suffered from the same main fall ...
Revel and AR working together (via Disney Research)   Disney’s ambitions have taken an intriguing turn concerning its ventures into the technology sector over making pseudo-adult oriented animated films. One piece of technology Disney’s researchers are developing is their Revel wearable tactile/haptic touch display, which doesn’t require the use of specialized gloves. Disney’s design makes use of reverse electro-vibration, which sends a weak oscillating electrical fi ...
Tensor Display concept (via MIT)   Watching movies on an IMAX 3D screen is impressive, leaving the home theater lackluster in comparison (unless you own an $113,000 US B&O 103in 3D TV). Researchers from MIT’s Media Lab are looking to change that by getting rid of the glasses needed to view our favorite HD movies in three dimensions,  introducing ‘Tensor Displays’. Their 3D technology is being touted as ‘producing images as bright as conventional TV’s w ...
(Left) Nepenthes Pitcher Plant (Right) SLIPS surface concept, inspired by the plant (via Harvard & Ubcbotanicalgarden & Centre for plant research)   Many industrial applications call for specialized materials that have repellency to viscous fluids or bacteria growth. Some materials require being transparent and stain-resistant while others may need to be biocompatible with living things. These seemingly unrelated characteristics gives rise to a slew of different materials that must ...
  BBC Sport was the driving force behind the coverage of the Olympic Games and new figures show that the broadcaster's online platform registered as many as 55 million visits from different devices around the world. The BBC said that 37 million of these visits came from UK-based sports fans, while the remaining numbers came from overseas.   The site hits its peak on August 1st, when Tour de France winner Bradley Wiggins added to his medal haul from Beijing in 2008 and Athens in 2004. O ...
    The teaching of information computer technology (ICT) in the UK is about 20 years behind the rest of the world, according to one expert, who claimed that this has caused the industry to lose an entire generation of intelligent people. Dr Mike Short, President of the Institution of Engineering and Technology, has argued that the government is principally responsible for the failure to improve ICT teaching.   He observed that although the current generation engages with cuttin ...
Sheep texting concept, visualized (by Cabe Atwell)     The last thing I would expect to receive a text message from is a sheep. But that is exactly the plan Switzerland and France based researchers have recently attempted. Due to a rising amount of wolf attacks on herds of sheep, shepherds may soon have technology on their side — helping keep their flock safe.     In a Switzerland based trail experiment, 12 sheep were equipped with heart rate monitors and two muzzled ...
System concept (via Oustanding Technology)   Outstanding Technology unveiled their line of Visual Light Communication (VLC) devices at this year’s LED Next Stage conference held in Tokyo. The unveiling focused on two devices set for commercial use that takes advantage of an LED location service, called the Commulite System, to transmit data instead of using a Wi-Fi signal. The gadgets are visible light transceivers and are essentially the same with the only difference between both are ...
Water Strider robot (via China’s School of Chemical Engineering and Technology)   Don’t grab a can of RAID just yet, this ‘water strider’ isn’t biological but rather mechanical — capable of walking and jumping on the surface of water. The microbot was designed by engineers, led by Associate Professor Qinmin Pan, from China’s School of Chemical Engineering and Technology and mimics the movements of its biological cousin known as Gerridae.   The ...
  Google has become embroiled in a new war with Apple by updating its voice-based search technology, which it hopes will usurp Siri as the market leader. Using the new update, consumers are able to perform a range of tasks, including basic things like checking the weather forecast.   The firm has confirmed that it is currently testing a new service that will fuse Gmail, Google's own email system, and its search engine. Most tech experts accept that the launch of the voice-recognition ...
Muscle implant "stretching-machine" (via Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center)   It turns out lab-engineered muscle responds to exercise in a similar way natural muscles do. A group of researchers from Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center's Institute for Regenerative Medicine conducted tests on four different groups of mice and found that exercised muscle implants showed significant recovery, developing and functioning better than their non-exercised counterparts.     To conduct th ...
(Left) Scafolding produced for heart repair, under magnification (Right) application needle, the bright-white spots below the tip is electric conduction of 10-30,000V (via British Heart Foundation & BBC)   Heart attacks and heart disease are atop the leading causes of death in the “developed” world — and those that developed a lot of unhealthy habits. Advances in medical science have given many second chances at life, but survivors must live with crippling effects of ...
(Left) Mali T678 block diagram (Right) Mali real-world perfomrance test (via ARM)   When it comes to mobile computing, ARM Holdings is the boss. The Samsung Galaxy S III exhibits the greatest graphics power around utilizing ARM's quad-core Mali 400 GPU.  ARM has announced they have the next family graphics processors ready, the Mali-T600 GPU. It has taken so long to bring the T600 to market, that they are also release the next iteration of Mali-T600 series GPUs that will perform up to ...
Biopsy assisting robot (via MIT)   Having a biopsy done for examination of ‘suspicious’ tissue is certainly no fun for the patient or the doctor. Medical researchers from MIT are looking to, at least, make the process a little more easier (and cheaper) with their ‘minimally-invasive’ robotic biopsy assistant.   Taking a biopsy (depending on what type) usually involves CT scans of the area and using a precisely-guided needle to take a tissue sample, which is the ...
Concept art (via Kevin Hard & Teknisk Ukeblad)   Those looking to commit crimes by hiding out where no one can see them, better think again. WiFi signals bathe other everything, including criminal activity. Law enforcement may employ a high-tech toy in the form of a Passive Bistatic WiFi Radar that can see through walls. The bad guys can't hide. (This is similar to the "Doppler" radar Batman used in the film "The Dark Knight.")   Signal process, how it can see through walls (via L ...
Electro-tacticle fingertip sensor (via UIUC)   Today has never been a better day for those who have careers in the medical field. On top of that nice paycheck, they get to have all the latest gadgets with cutting-edge technology, such as the University of Illinois electro-tactile silicon finger-tip circuit that provides vibration feedback for multiple uses.   The Urbana-based engineering team, led by Professor John Rogers, designed the tactile feedback finger-tip by fabricating layers ...
DareDroid 2.0, drink dispensing dress (via eSeL.at - Joanna Pianka)   Fashion is just girls playing dress up, right? The highest fashion would rarely ever make it to a person's weekly rotation. Often this level of style is for designers to play with concepts, usually resulting in garments that are priced right outside of logic. These are the common perspectives of an elitist world where few really get to participate and so people like myself are quick to dismiss or criticize.     ...
Stone Spray concept image. (via Institute for Advanced Architecture of Catalonia)   We have seen the good and the bad of 3D printer's influence on the world. Still fledgling in maturity, the devices are limited when it comes to the materials it can use to create objects. It is also limited in that it can only print in one direction (usually up) and do it in a confined area, which incidentally, limits the size of the object being created.   Architects Petr Novikov, Inder Shergill, and ...
Node.js WiFi-Extending Robot (via Notheastern University)   Electrical and computer engineers from Northeastern University have collaborated on a robotic vehicle that’s designed to bring Wi-Fi into hazardous areas where getting a high-speed connection is next to impossible. Known as the Node.js WiFi-Extending Robot, the team designed the 150lbs mini-tank using a custom-built aluminum frame (using 3D CAD software, a CNC machine and water-jet cutter) with after-market treads that house ...
Emma and her 'magic arms' (via DuPont Hospital)   Corporations, garage-based engineers, and hobbyists have taken to 3D –printers like a moth to a flame. They have gone mainstream (they’ve been around since the 80’s), they are affordable. While some have used them to help fabricate some lethal home-defense devices (see post on HaveBlue’s printed lower receiver) others, such as Nemours/Alfred I. DuPont Hospital for Children, have used them in an effort to help childre ...
Toshiba solar-panels being installed at an evacuation center in Miyagi (via Toshiba)   Minamisoma City (located in the Fukushima Prefecture) in Japan has recently signed on with Toshiba to create the largest solar-park in the country. The decision was made as the country is still reeling from the devastation caused by last year’s tsunami and catastrophic meltdown of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear reactor. In fact, Minamisoma has joined with sister-city Namie in an effort to scrub the n ...
  The ongoing Olympic Games has served to underline the fact that consumers are increasingly reliant on mobile technology to keep up to date with the news.  That is according to the National Inflation Association (NIA) in the US, which has observed that an impressive number of Americans followed the recent 100 metre Final through a smartphone or a laptop.   Figures show that as many as 1.3 million Americans followed the race, won by Jamaican world record holder Usain Bolt, using ...
Me (in the Grey Shirt) w/ the other Founding members of the PopShop co-working Space, one of the many places where the way we work is fundamentally changing.   Entrepreneurship is a fancy word.  It's frequently thrown around and abused, generally being used to refer to anything remotely related to starting something new.  More and more, entrepreneurship has become a sexy buzzword, diluting the real meaning and intent of the term.  Entrepreneurship is about taking ideas, and t ...
Armadillo Aerospace's Stig-A hovering, tethered (via Armadillo Aerospace)   Armadillo Aerospace, founded by John Carmack, of video-game fame (Doom, Quake and Rage), has recently been issued their Operator License from the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) for their Stig-B reusable launch vehicle (rocket). The license gives the team from Armadillo the ‘go-ahead’ to launch the reusable sub-orbital rocket through to July 2014 from Spaceport America in New Mexico. The Stig-B roc ...
Samsung NAND promotional image (via Samsung)   Just recently Samsung has stated that it has begun production of their fastest embedded memory for mobile devices. The Samsung Embedded Multimedia Card (eMMC) Pro Class 1500 will become available in 16, 32, and 64 gigabyte capabilities. The increase in storage size will help mobile device systems run better, faster, and more efficiently. The memory will also be helping out the processors within smart phones, which are already running close to ...
(via ARM)   ARM Holdings dominates the quickly growing mobile processing industry. It  makes sense for them to be concerned about the “Internet of Things” to come. Especially since people are using smart devices to connect to the internet more and more every day. For example, there was 1 billion smart devices connected in 2011, and there expects to be 50 billion smart devices connected within the next 10 years. ARM expects that within the next 10 years, anything that will ...
(via USB.org)   Since the launch of the Thunderbolt cables over a year ago, there has been a subtle competition with the Universal Serial Bus (USB) cables. Thunderbolt cables offer 10Gbps of transfer rate while SuperSpeed USB cables only offer 5Gbps. In addition, Thunderbolt offers 10W of power through the cables to a device. However, the cables are much more expensive, $49.00 compared to $4.49, USB being the later. Recently the USB 3.0 promoter group has stepped up the competition and app ...
Plenty of positivity today, or at least when I took a screen capture (via http://www.emoto2012.org/)   You may be familiar with the work of Dr. Masaru Emoto, in which he claims that human consciousness, specifically positive or negative thoughts, can have an effect on the structures formed in freezing water. Whether you believe his claims or not, there is no doubt that human consciousness can alter the memories, perspectives and perceptions of another based on the information projected. A ...
  With London staging the Olympic Games and Paralympic Games over the next month or so, the city is currently the focus of the entire sporting world. Indeed, many of the world's best athletes are locked away in training camps in various locations around the city, preparing for their shot at Olympic glory.   But according to British Chancellor George Osborne, the city's reputation as a burgeoning centre for technological advancement is about to seize its opportunity, too, and reach a ...
  The British road and track cycling team has enjoyed extraordinary success in Olympic Games and World Championships over the last few years, with the like of Sir Chris Hoy writing himself into the record books with his performances. Despite this, the Great Britain team will freely admit to the enormous contribution that cutting-edge technology has made to its success.   For British fans, the action in the new Olympic Velodrome represents some of the best opportunities for medals, wi ...
A week ago Andrew Hacker asked on the New York Times editorial page “Is Algebra Necessary?” and concluded for most students it isn’t.    The first practical thing that comes to mind is all the reports of average salaries of jobs requiring only a bachelor’s degree.  Depending on which list you look at, the jobs with the top five or top ten salaries are all jobs that require at least algebra.  Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) jo ...
NASA sent $2.5 billion US Dollars 567 million kilometers (352 million miles) to Mars. The most advanced robotic exploration vehicle, dubbed Curiosity. Millions of people watched all over the world at NASA.gov for live streaming of the event. Get together, parties, dance parties to celebrate Curiosity's land peppered the globe. All were on edge, cheering every successful step in its complicated landing procedure. Flight control at NASA walked everyone through the "7 minutes of terror" as it set d ...
Introductory Lazer Tag (AR) system (via Hasbro)   When I was young, laser tag sent my imagination to a futuristic world, where war felt as real as the gun I held. The problem with most of the laser tag systems I had was finding people to play with that had the same guns. Creative do-it-yourselfers have made their own laser tag using code scanners and bar codes, but the toy company Hasbro wants to make this experience more popular using augmented reality (AR) to unite new generations and ex ...
Artificial photosynthesis in action. (Left) nitride semiconductor (Right) Metallic catalyst (via Panasonic)   There is plenty left to learn from plants, as we venture towards more complex gadgets. All they need is nutrients, water and light (for the most part) to generate usable food and other organic materials. Panasonic has just developed a system that generates formic acid by using a process we learned from plants, photosynthesis.     The key to this project was finding the ...
Transparent solar cell concept and prototype (via ACSNana & UCLA)   UCLA is increasing the odds of having electrical devices that recharge simply using the sun. Their goals are to keep the cells cheap while allowing for more power conversion efficiency (PCE) and transparency of visible light.     To do this, the team of researchers from UCLA’s Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science, their department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and the California Nano ...
  Despite years of preparation and extensive testing, a 31-year-old from Walnut Creek, California, has managed to get the better of US TV network NBC, which is broadcasting the 2012 Olympic Games. In fact, it took Jason Legate a mere ten minutes to connect his computer to a London-based server, which allowed him to access the BBC’s coverage and thereby circumvent that of NBC.   Speaking to Reuters, the computer enthusiast explained that despite having only used minimal effort, ...
ORD Bot Hadron rendered concept (via Inventables)   Have you been looking to build your own 3D printer, or want to add a CNC mill to your workshop? You might want to check out Inventables, “The Hardware Store for Designers.” Inventables is an online hardware store created for people with a strong do-it-yourself mentality. They offer and sell a wide range of products including laser cutting materials, innovative materials, hardware, and raw materials. The team is made up of a gr ...
Hair sensor (via Seoul National University)   Sometimes when we step back and look at nature it can be a source of inspiration and innovation. For example, legged motion is preferred when building robots rather than a wheel base for increased stability through rough terrains. Kahp-Yang Suh and a team from Seoul National University in South Korea have recognized that hair is used in a large variety of ways in nature to help functions such as sensing, insulation, air filters(such as nose hai ...
  The Olympic Games is always a platform for new records and ground-breaking achievements, but one of the most dominant features of London 2012 will be the evolution of sports television.   The BBC, host broadcaster of the Games, has invested in enormous sums in trying to deliver the best possible coverage. And just a few days ago, the broadcaster showcased super hi-vision, with pictures 16 times as sharp as HDTV. Certainly, coverage of the Games has come an awfully long way in th ...
Medusoid - artificial "jellyfish" (via California Insititue of Technology)   Silicon finds a use beyond the circuit board.   Scientists from the California Institute of Technology and Harvard’s Wyss Institute have succeeded in a collaboration to create a bio-synthetic jellyfish to gain a foot-hold on repairing or replacing damaged heart-valves in humans. The team of scientists designed their synthetic jellyfish, known as ‘Medusoid’ (shape resembling a jellyfish), to ...
I-BESS sensor package (via US Army)   The US Army’s Rapid Equipping Force and researchers from Georgia Tech Research Institute is set to outfit 1,000 soldiers with a sensor package that collects data on trauma associated with explosions. While that may sound grim, the data collected could be invaluable for creating medical procedures and gear that could help save the lives of soldiers in the near future. In fact, they could help prevent serious brain injuries while personnel use the s ...
  Trying to destroy cancer cells without damaging surrounding tissue and organs has been a challenge scientist have been trying to overcome for some time. A new femtosecond laser technology recently developed at the University of Tennessee's Center for Laser Applications may overcome those difficulties presented. The laser created by researchers Christian  Parigger, Jacqueline Johnson, and Robert Splinter discovers, maps, and destroys cancerous cells using ultra-short light pulses. & ...
Project Holodeck with Oculus Rift glasses (via PalmerTech)   Star Trek’s holodeck is coming closer to becoming a reality with a Interactive gaming VR environment project called Project Holodeck. Designed by a myriad of researchers from various departments at the University of Southern California, led by Nathan Burba, the developing virtual reality gaming system puts the gamer in a virtual 3D environment, albeit without the ability to battle tangible Klingons.   The team designed ...

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