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Disclaimer: I’m an engineer, not a pro film maker. Be advised. Disclaimer: I’m an engineer, not a pro film maker. Be advised.   Raspberry Pi cases are all the rage. Everyone makes blocky cases, wood cases, cases shaped like computers or arcade cabinets. I wanted a case that could interact with the physical space around it-- why not put a Raspberry Pi 2 in a ball?   Here are just a few things I can do now--   bowl with it wirelessly connect to the Internet ...
I decided to add my temperature sensor to my new Pi2. This is fairly straightforward - you need the following   1 DS18B20 temperature sensor 1 4.7K resistor   Wiring it up   The DS18B20 sensor has three pins which are connected as follows. Note that the sensor has a domed side and a flat side - make sure you have it the right way round (i.e. flat side towards the pi in the breadboard setup shown below). Pin 1 connects to GND Pin 2 connects to GPIO4 on the Raspberry Pi Pin 3 ...
3DRacers race in progress (via Marco D'Alia & indigogo)   If you’re a fan of video racing games, such as the all-time favorite Mario Kart, you may freak for 3DRacers. The company takes competitive racing from the screen to your living room floor through 3D printing, microcontrollers and your smartphone.   The new concept allows users to make their own 3D-printed cars that can be controlled via Bluetooth through their phones and then race with friends on carpet or an option ...
This is the Raspberry Pi 2, which I used to calculate pi against other Pis. (Image via Raspberry Pi) I received a Raspberry Pi 2, and immediately wanted to see how much of an improvement it was. Games seem smoother, especially first person shooters. Arcade emulation is buttery as well, however perceived speed wasn’t scientific enough for me so I decided it would be apt to calculate Pi, on the Pi.   To start with, I installed the Command Line Calculator, called BC   Easy to ...
Robots with Wheels Enter Your Electronics & Design Project for Your Chance to Win a $100 Shopping Cart! Back to The Project14 homepage Project14 Home Monthly Themes Monthly Theme Poll   Note: XMP-2 also has a virtual simulation, check it out by clicking here.   Introduction The ground-breaking XMOS startKIT is an ultra-low cost near-credit-card sized board designed for real time operations. It was launched about a year ago at a very low cost (£12 including VAT) as a proce ...
Today we’ll be creating a remote controlled satellite weather station using a Raspberry Pi, a temperature sensor and a RockBLOCK. The envisioned application would be a weather station in a really remote location (i.e. outside of mobile/cellular coverage) – maybe in the middle of the desert, the jungle, or even the arctic – sending its data back to some kind of central weather system. We’ll keep it really simple, using just one temperature sensor, but additional sensors co ...
Filled with poor judgement, and delight! ...

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