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2015
  So, What Have You Got? If you missed the introduction to this series, you will be needing the Raspberry Pi 2 GPS Kit unless you are sufficiently equipped with similar parts or hardware. Ten skilful people were chosen from just over four hundred to receive one of the kits from us at element14 and they may well have other ideas for the kit than for Geocaching, which is great! I look forward to seeing what you build - but there may be some, including those whom have bought the kit, that want ...
dmedlow

Geocaching Build

Posted by dmedlow Jul 20, 2015
Being selected for the geocaching build is fairly awesome. It does raise the challenge of exactly what to build. My partner is a geocaching fanatic - but is often cursing at the handheld dedicated GPS unit she uses. Often it fails to provide a good position fix, its hard to download web based cache location, the UI is rubbish and the batteries drain faster than you can say 'do we have any more batteries'.   My initial thoughts are to use the Pi + GPS (obviously) combined with one of the ...
  What is it about Nikola Tesla that inspires engineers around the world?   The slights he suffered at the hands of his close-minded, condescending boss, Thomas Edison, who refused to see the potential of alternating current? The breathtaking scope of his altruism, as evidenced by his decision to tear-up his patent agreement on AC current to save his employer, George Westinghouse, from financial ruin? (A decision which in all likelihood prevented him from becoming the world's first b ...
Silicon Valley folklore holds that William Shockley, a brilliant physicist who headed up Bell Labs solid-state group after World War II, could never accept that his employees, John Bardeen and Walter Brattain, received credit for discovering the property of electrical transistence instead of him. Bell Labs famously arranged photo-ops like the one below to suggest that Shockley, seated at the microscope, was as closely involved in the discovery of the transistor as Bardeen and Brattain.   ...
History teaches that Wilbur and Orville Wright successfully performed the first motorized human flight on December 17, 1903.   But were they the first to do so?   For years, there has been an alternative theory about a little-known inventor in New Zealand named Richard Pearse. Proponents of Pearse hold that he successfully covered about 350 yards in his motorized airplane on March 31, 1902-- about a year and a half before the Wright brothers' famous experiments at Kitty Hawk.  ...
Congratulations from element14 !   Out of an incredible 400+ entries requesting the Raspberry Pi 2 GPS kit, ten people from across the globe presented themselves with an application putting forward projects and enthusiasm abound that have earned themselves the kit to build along with myself and element14:   Dennis Medlow Bob Alexander Steven Ford Charles Mao Petrache Valentin Bruno Giffard Ovidiu-Florin Bogdan Jason Nuckols Mark Fink Robert Reese Your kits will be sent out over th ...
Hi Everyone.   Here are the newest suggestions. Which of the suggested entries below stand out to you and should be included in the Atlas? Are there any you think we should not include? Given that we're a community of electronic engineers, it's no surprise that a lot of our locations skew toward discoveries in electronics, like Jack Kilby demonstrating the first working integrated circuit. But we also want the Atlas to encompass all kinds of scientific discoveries-- electronic, physical, m ...