Skip navigation

Geocaching

5 Posts authored by: bluescreen element14 Team
  What is it about Nikola Tesla that inspires engineers around the world?   The slights he suffered at the hands of his close-minded, condescending boss, Thomas Edison, who refused to see the potential of alternating current? The breathtaking scope of his altruism, as evidenced by his decision to tear-up his patent agreement on AC current to save his employer, George Westinghouse, from financial ruin? (A decision which in all likelihood prevented him from becoming the world's first b ...
Silicon Valley folklore holds that William Shockley, a brilliant physicist who headed up Bell Labs solid-state group after World War II, could never accept that his employees, John Bardeen and Walter Brattain, received credit for discovering the property of electrical transistence instead of him. Bell Labs famously arranged photo-ops like the one below to suggest that Shockley, seated at the microscope, was as closely involved in the discovery of the transistor as Bardeen and Brattain.   ...
History teaches that Wilbur and Orville Wright successfully performed the first motorized human flight on December 17, 1903.   But were they the first to do so?   For years, there has been an alternative theory about a little-known inventor in New Zealand named Richard Pearse. Proponents of Pearse hold that he successfully covered about 350 yards in his motorized airplane on March 31, 1902-- about a year and a half before the Wright brothers' famous experiments at Kitty Hawk.  ...
Hi Everyone.   Here are the newest suggestions. Which of the suggested entries below stand out to you and should be included in the Atlas? Are there any you think we should not include? Given that we're a community of electronic engineers, it's no surprise that a lot of our locations skew toward discoveries in electronics, like Jack Kilby demonstrating the first working integrated circuit. But we also want the Atlas to encompass all kinds of scientific discoveries-- electronic, physical, m ...
Hi Everyone.   As you know, we've been busy adding new locations to our Atlas of Scientific Achievement above. We're now up to ~120 data points tracking everything from the invention of the first transistor to the formulation of the Big Bang theory. From the invention of the laser to the discovery of the earliest hominids in East Africa. It's been amazing watching the history of human discovery come alive before our very eyes, and we're thrilled to see that you're also getting into it, and ...