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Driving the micro:bit legacy Media coverage was already pretty large on the micro:bit program. Anyway, we thought it could be intersting to get an other perspective on the initiative. This article was first published in the embedded beat blog platform on freescale.com   The micro:bit project is a groundbreaking partnership between international corporations, including Freescale and Farnell element14. Freescale provide a Kinetis KL26 MCU and two motion sensors – a 3-axis acceleromet ...
this article was first published in embedded beat, the blog platform of www.freescale.com   Driving the micro:bit legacy The micro:bit initiative is a groundbreaking partnership in the STEM area between international corporations, including Freescale. We provide a Kinetis KL26 MCU and two motion sensors – a 3-axis accelerometer, and a 3-axis magnetometer on a development board. The program aims to make a huge impact in 2015 with the BBC and its partners committed providing up to 1 ...
We were invited by Manchester's Museum of Science & Industry to spend the evening of Friday, 24th July, at the press preview of a new, hands-on exhibition, called PLAY It!, and we thought you'd like to hear all about it. This is the first time that MOSI has run any kind of gaming event, which it's doing in partnership with retro connoisseurs Replay Events, and is a perfect addition to the venue's already entertaining offerings.     The PLAY It! 80s Classroom. Quiet at the Back! Pr ...
Remember the BBC Micro? Tom Hargreaves does. Were they in your school, or maybe in your home? Thirty years ago these silicon stalwarts marked the first time computers became a common sight in the schools of Great Britain, and provided an introduction to coding that spawned many of the industry leaders in the current games and software arenas.   And now it's happening again. The BBC is gearing up to send out 1 million Micro Bit single-board-computers to schools around the country to give ki ...