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I activated one effect in this section of the LED panel. (via ME)   I will admit, I could not expand the memory much with the Micro:bit for the last project. So, before I explore memory expansion, I thought I would see what else I could do with the 8x8 LED grid panel. Although the LED panel is simply a reconfiguration of an addressable LED strip, but I wanted it to act like a screen. So, when the keypad is pressed, I wanted effects to correlate with the buttons. So, in this version I wan ...
Lighting up two groups of LEDs with two buttons. They are bright! (Images & video: Me)   I learned quite a bit in the last 10-LED PWM controller project. I learned that I maxed out what I could do with the Micro:bit as far as traditional LED controlling was concerned. The problems being I could only control so many, couldn’t record a sequence, and was limited in the output power for each LED.   The logical next step was rip everything out and go with addressable LEDs. In t ...
In this introduction to programming using Kitronik and the BBC micro:bit, students will create a “Magic 8-Ball” game. The game works by generating a random predictions when the micro:bit is shaken or a button is pressed e.g. “Yes”, “Most likely” and “Outlook not so good”.   The Magic 8 Ball is made up of 20 responses – 10 positive, 5 negative and 5 neutral. ...
Game-based learning and micro:bit games have been a topic of much discussion of studies throughout the year. Introducing our class to physical computing with micro:bit and Tynker Blocks bring abstract programs to life on a tangible physical device. It’s through this great idea that we should all learn the basics of coding, to familiarize ourselves with what goes on behind the scenes of those great games we love while using and understand computers and create something of our own! Here's an ...