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micro:bit

4 Posts authored by: davidlockett
In this introduction to programming using Kitronik and the BBC micro:bit, students will create a “Magic 8-Ball” game. The game works by generating a random predictions when the micro:bit is shaken or a button is pressed e.g. “Yes”, “Most likely” and “Outlook not so good”.   The Magic 8 Ball is made up of 20 responses – 10 positive, 5 negative and 5 neutral. ...
Game-based learning and micro:bit games have been a topic of much discussion of studies throughout the year. Introducing our class to physical computing with micro:bit and Tynker Blocks bring abstract programs to life on a tangible physical device. It’s through this great idea that we should all learn the basics of coding, to familiarize ourselves with what goes on behind the scenes of those great games we love while using and understand computers and create something of our own! Here's an ...
One of the goals of this ongoing project is to introduce students to microcontroller programming and provide a practical understanding of micro:bit hardware, software, and programming. Microcontroller programming is popular for robotics and understanding how software controls hardware. It is also a very fun way for students to learn about computers and programming because of the drag and drop” block coding application. During each session, students learned about Microbit and Kitronik har ...
The benefits of coding extend far beyond creating software and websites. Before students start working with micro:bit, they must first learn computational thinking skills, which is the ability to approach a problem in a structured and logical way. Incorporating computer science into core curriculum is well-deserved. Not only does it give all students the skills needed to enter the growing field of computer science and gaming, but it also teaches them foundational skills such as problem solving a ...