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micro:bit

5 Posts authored by: straytech
Despite the micro:bit Education Giveaway Challenge being over, one of my teams decided to release their game to the element14 community for everyone to try and enjoy! This game requires no modification or additional circuit design, and can be played by multiple players with only a micro:bit club/classroom kit. The game can serve as a class introduction to the micro:bit, or used as a tutorial to cover accelerometer, display, radio and defining custom functions.   The attached .pdf file ex ...
For those Just now joining the micro:bit fun, I am a college professor in game design, and have been involved with various maker and hacker groups for many years. I have been blogging about my experience introducing the micro:bit platform to college students in an intermediate Game Design class where I teach. Their project was to make a multiplayer game, using the micro:bit’s radio library for communication, so the game accounts for space or motion as part of gameplay. Gestures were used t ...
Week 2 of my student’s game design development project went pretty smoothly. Students spent most of their time exploring the boundaries of the micro:bit platform, and sorting out the core concepts to their games. Most of the teams strayed away from their original idea, as they started thinking about the potential interactions of this hardware device. I’ve generally found that to be a perfectly natural part of mid-scale classroom projects. Though my initial projection was for them to ...
Getting Started In WEEK 1 of our micro:bit game design project, I introduced both the platform and the project to my students. These students have seen Python before, but have never seen microcontrollers, or dealt with wireless communication.   I find history to be a VERY important part of teaching technology, so introduced the micro:bit through a history that included microcontrollers since the mid 1970s and the impact of open-source communities on the industry, in more recent years. Af ...
The Platform I’m proud to be one of the recipients of “The Great micro:bit Education Giveaway” and received my classroom kit a few weeks ago. I’ve been a college professor for about a decade, and have been involved with the hacker/maker community even longer. I’ve published many open-source projects with Arduino and other platforms, but I’m new to the micro:bit.   During my first couple of hours with the platform, I found it to be one of the simplest s ...