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BuildBrighton

12 posts
tub

Phonicubes - final post

Posted by tub May 2, 2011
Roundup Since the last blog summarising blog post, we've been beavering away at building the final prototype for our toy, oh, and we came up with a name for it too, Phonicubes... phonics, and cubes! Jason has been working on building the sound board, which is an integrated Arduino and Waveshield on one board. Steve designed and built the enclosure for the toy, which you can see to the right. In the mean time I've been collecting everyone's work and source files and posted everything up on git ...
Now we have all the parts required for our competition entry, I had to make something to put it all in!   I had to do this with stuff on hand. The UK is on extended holidays because of the Royal wedding, that means stores close early.   We mocked up a quick case at our last meeting, it needed to have space for:   All 4 cubes. All electronics. Battery power RFID reader Speaker   It ended up looking a bit like a body with face, so we decided to make it into an Owl.  ...
hotchk155

Finished Sound Hardware

Posted by hotchk155 Apr 22, 2011
After a couple of false starts I finally finished the sound board for the phonics reader... The circuit is pretty much the same as the one I breadboarded, but with the addition of a 5V regulator and supply smoothing caps, so it should not be fussy about supply. The board basically combines an Arduino (Atmega328 on board) with Adafruit's waveshield circuit, so its a standalone SD card reader/sound player designed to be receive commands thru the serial interface to play files from the SD card.  ...
A quick update on where I am with the soundbox for the phonics project...   While I was experimenting with the wave shield library code (AF_Wave), I found that 22kHz seems to be sailing a little close to the wind. Just a little extra load on the Arduino (Like polling the serial port) and that busy little timer interrupt service routine driving the DAC can disappear up its own backside , causing the code to freeze up with a crackle.   It took me a while to work out thats what was going ...
If you've not been keeping up with our Hackspace Challenge entry, we're designing and building a toy to help teach kids how to speak and spell English using the Phonics system. It involves setting a 'target word' for the kid to spell, and let them enter the word one phoneme at a time. The toy will say each phoneme as it's put down, and when the target word is spelled correctly the toy will pronounce the word. This flow is detailed in the diagram below: Because we went for a modular approach f ...
blinky465

Cube reader for input

Posted by blinky465 Apr 4, 2011
As part of an ongoing development, Ben and Chris finally got a working prototype of Ben's cube-reader idea. Small cubes are used as input devices - in the final, complete concept, these could be used for pretty much anything: as a password entry system, as an electronic interactive puzzle game, as musical style selections and so on.   For the BuildBrighton Global Challenge, we're looking to print different phonemes onto the face of each dice and use them as an input method for the phonics ...
I've been spending the last couple of weeks tinkering with options for audio output for the project and thought it was about time I wrote something up.   The way I am seeing how this phonics game might work is that the child is set a target word somehow (e.g. by selecting a picture card) and as well as seeing a picture of a target object (for example a Cat) the game will also speak the word. It doesn't seem such a good idea for the child to see the word written down at this time, since they ...
BuildBrighton has been a hive of activity for the past week, with members heading off to prototype their chosen parts of project. Here's what we said we'd do in the first blog post: Toby    Manage the project, making sure we meet our deadlines and targets. Input: Investigate RFID, and multiplexing RFID antennae Ben          Input: Physical input devices, e.g. punch cards, switches etc Chris and Ben     & ...
Howdy,   In the previous blog post I mentioned that the cubes can be auto ejected. This is after the child has sucessfully spelt the word that was requested, so they can move onto the next one without manually removing the cubes.   It uses a simple servo mechanism that you can see in the video. Basically the servo pushes a bar and this in turn presses some dowls that enter the cube socket and push the cube out. The dowls are returned using springs. This could be done manually via a l ...
Howdy,   From the talks we had about the challenge last Thursday, I have designed a simple cube reader that does not require any fancy tech.   Here is what it uses.  Arduino MEGA Adafruit WaveShield Magnets Resistors Lasercut enclosures   Here is how it works.  Cubes contain resistors on each face. These are soldered to magnets which are orientated on their sides and poke through slits in the cube face. This prevents them from falling out of the cube and causuing ...
talkingjazz

Phonics Owl

Posted by talkingjazz Mar 26, 2011
Following on from Thursdays meet-up, as often happens I started looking at toys. The Early Learning Centre has a selection of phonics (keyword, not necessarily  actually phonics) related educational items, including a few electronic ones. Goodie.   I was upset and distressed to find that the Peppa Pig's Fun Phonics was not in stock. They did however have an exciting looking Phonics owl which appeared to contain quite a few similarities to what we were talking about on the Thursday meet ...
Mitch teaching people to solder at BuildBrighton, photo by Barney A Letter From Mitch Sunday evening we received word from  Mitch Altman that we, along with 30 other hackerspaces, had been  accepted into the Great Global Hackerspace Challenge. If you don't know  what it's all about, check out the hackerspace challenge group. On hearing about our acceptance into the challenge we decided to meet  up as soon as possible to discuss ideas for the our project. A few of us  me ...