Skip navigation
2011

Earlier this week a friend told us he was having hard times when installing his codewarrior on a brand new PC...

"maybe he were doing something bad" you might think, but no...

After a few tries (and failures), we start thinking this was related to something "else"

regarding, some funny virus scan from his McAfee antivirus appeared each time:

 

Yesterday we found McAfee Antivirus and Code Warrior Special Edition Download forum entry

and we tried its solution... now, our codewarrior installer already did its job, and he is now debugging

 

Basically, the work around is to disable the antivirus while you install the application,

once is installed, you can turn on the McAfee software... pretty easy... right? (after three days) ¬¬°

 

The past couple of days were quite interesting, trying to understand the missing step (you know, we engineers are quite stubborn)

We asked some friends on Freescale, and it seems this bug is affecting Code Warrior 7.2, on all Windows OS versions,

but ONLY with McAfee antivirus...if you find it is affecting some other OS or antivirus, please let us know!

So back in November 2009 I posted an article about my starting to play around with RTOS to grow in my technical knowledge. I must confess something: I haven’t really played with MQX or others as much as I would have liked…at least not during 2010. But then something happened: Freescale’s Kinetis family of ARM microcontrollers was launched and now my worked has forced me (in a good way) to work with the MQX RTOS quite a lot more. It’s been great fun.
In my self-training of MQX I’ve run into basically two ways of doing things. One way is to subdivide all functions into tasks, using all sorts of RTOS goodies like semaphores, priorities and mutexes (is that the right plural? How about mutexii?). This way, as far as I understand RTOS, is the right way to do it, it’s elegant.
On the other hand, I’ve seen code were the author basically creates two or three tasks and then proceeds to manually do the application control manually i.e.: switch-case statements with binary flags and stuff. Almost as doing a bare metal application where the RTOS is only there for the drivers. Correct me if I’m wrong, but, doesn’t that beat the whole purpose of using an RTOS?

So back in November 2009 I posted an article about my starting to play around with RTOS to grow in my technical knowledge. I must confess something: I haven’t really played with MQX or others as much as I would have liked…at least not during 2010. But then something happened: Freescale’s Kinetis family of ARM microcontrollers was launched and now my worked has forced me (in a good way) to work with the MQX RTOS quite a lot more. It’s been great fun.


In my self-training of MQX I’ve run into basically two ways of doing things. One way is to subdivide all functions into tasks, using all sorts of RTOS goodies like semaphores, priorities and mutexes (is that the right plural? How about mutexii?). This way, as far as I understand RTOS, is the right way to do it, it’s elegant.

 

 

Continue reading on EmbeddedStories blog

Filter Blog

By date: By tag: