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2015
zylotech

LPC4357-EVB

Posted by zylotech May 25, 2015

Hi all,

 

I recently bought a development board LPC4357 - EVB .

I can not so much regarding ARM programming or no experience when it comes ULINK2 , Keil and LPC4357 - EVB .

 

I have downloaded Examples2 \ GPIO \ Gpio_LedBlinky project .

When I program GPIO_ledBlinky in InFlash mode.

All goes well , I see that LED flashes.

 

But when I remove ULINK2 from the USB port when the LED stops flashing.

Should not be the code to be programmed into the LPC4357 chip when selecting " InFlash " ?

 

And why can not program in SPIFI mode (the flash is full chip Erased before i try flash in SPIFI mode)


DIP switch is

1. Down

2. UP

3. UP

4. UP

I get an error like this pop-up message "ERROR: Flash Download failed - "Cortex-M4"

 

in Keil Build Output windows

Load "C:\\LocalData\\LPC4357-EVB\\Examples2\\GPIO\\Gpio_LedBlinky\\Keil\\SPIFI 64MB Debug\\example.axf"

Erase Done.

Programming Failed!

Error: Flash Download failed  -  "Cortex-M4"

Flash Load finished at 14:32:41

 

Best Regards

 

Martin

Europa squid.jpg

NASA eel bot that may delve into the depths of moon Europa. NASA recently announced their current 15 winners of NIAC funding for $100,000 for each candidate. Among them is a project to develop a robotic eel to explore Europa, Jupiter’s moon.  (via NASA)

 

 

Anyone seen that movie Europa Report? It may have inspired NASA...

 

NASA recently announced their winners of their annual NASA Innovative Advanced Concepts (NIAC) program. There are 15 winners in total that have far-out ideas (pun intended) about making science fiction a reality. NASA is hoping that these highly innovative, and a bit crazy, ideas will lead them to advances that can progress their ability to delve further into space.

 

One crazy idea that just might work is NIAC 2015 winner Mason Peck’s research to design a robotic eel that can explore the depths of Europa, one of Jupiter’s many moons. The idea is highly innovative and calls for the invention of new technologies – including new power systems.

 

A mock-up for the robot design is seen above. It would be a soft-bodied robot that can swim and explore the aquatic depths of Europa. Peck describes the robot as more of a squid than an eel, as NASA calls it. The science behind it is pretty inspiring. The body of the eel/squid would have ‘tentacle’ structures that allow it to harvest power effectively from changing electromagnetic fields.  The energy will power its rover subsystems, one of which allows it to expand and change shape to propel itself in water and on land. It would do this by electrolysis of water, creating H2 and O2 gas that will be harvested to expand, and combusted internally to act as a propulsion system. To learn more about the other 14 winners who scored $100,000 to develop technology like this, see their extensive report.

 

C

See more news at:

http://twitter.com/Cabe_Atwell

CVD-Graphene-640x354.jpg

Chalmers University of Technology researchers have found that large area graphene helps prolong the spin of electrons over longer periods of time (via Chalmers)


Chances are you own a smartphone, tablet or PC/laptop that features some form of solid-state technology - typically in the form of RAM, flash drives or SSD hard drive. Those devices are faster than their mechanical counterparts and new findings by researchers from Sweden’s Chalmers University of Technology are set to make that technology even faster and more energy efficient through the use of graphene.

 

Specifically, they found that large area graphene is able to prolong the spin of electrons (spintronics) over a longer period of time over that of ferrous metals. Spintronics deals with the intrinsic spin of electrons in a magnetic moment- or the torque it will experience when an external magnetic field is applied. As mentioned above there are already spintronic devices on the market, however they use ferrous metals for their base platform. It’s the impurities in those metals that hold spintronics back from becoming a mainstream component in today’s electronic circuitry- limiting the size of the components themselves.

 

This is where graphene comes into play as the material extends the area of spintronics from nanometers to millimeters, making the spin of those electrons last longer and travel farther than ever before. So why is that good? Data (in the form of 1’s and 0’s) is encoded onto those electrons as they spin up and spin down rather than relying on the other method of turning the electrical state of off and on using traditional circuits. The problem is as the process nodes become smaller it results in increased electrical ‘bleed’ across transistors in the off state thereby preventing us from building transistors that consume less power.

 

Using graphene as the substrate for spintronics allows for the electrons to maintain their spin alignment to a duration of 1.2 nanoseconds and transmit information contained in those electrons up to 16-micrometers long without degradation. Of course, progress doesn’t come without its problems- in this case it’s the graphene itself or rather the manufacturing process. Producing large sheets of the one-atom thick substance is still an issue for manufacturers and when it’s produced it usually has defects in terms of wrinkles and roughness, which can have negative effects on electron’s spin rate and decay.

 

The researchers however have found that the CVD (Chemical Vapor Deposition) method is promising and the team hopes to capitalize on it to produce a logical component in the short term with a long-term goal of producing graphene/spintronic-based components that will surpass solid-state devices in both speed and energy efficiency.

 

See more news at:

http://twitter.com/Cabe_Atwell

microchip ceo.jpg

Microchip CEO Steve Sanghi (via Microchip)


Microchip Technology, Inc., is celebrating this week, as it was just named the number one provider of 8-bit microcontrollers (MCU) globally. The title was awarded by Garner’s annual ranking publication, in its 2014 edition.

 

Microchip Technology, Inc., is an innovation giant that specializes in mixed-signal, Flash-IP and analog solutions. It has long been a leader in the microcontroller industry and although the powerhouse is celebrating its reclaim of the top spot for 8-bit MCUs, it is a leading provider of 16-bit and 32-bit MCU production as well.

 

Microchip is committed to growing its MCU technologies in all markets, including 8-bit, 16-bit and 32-bit product lines, and its dedication and commitment to excellence is paying off. The technology innovator was ranked the fastest growing MCU supplier of all top 10 providers in 2014. Its rate of growth was charted as double that of its competitors. With this, the company was also named one of the top 10 providers of 32-bit MCUs for the first time ever. While its stats across the MCU industry are impressive, what’s most striking is that Microchip closed a 41% revenue deficit to reclaim the stop spot from Renesas.

 

Renesas is a company resulting from the merge between NEC, Hitachi and Mitsubishi. These three companies were the leading semiconductor companies of Japan and when they merged, Microchip was knocked out of the top spot for 8-bit MCUs in 2010. At the time, Renasas’ business was 41% larger than that of Microchip, but it worked tirelessly each year, and finally won with a 10.5% advantage over the Japanese supplier in 2014.

 

MCUs are used for a number of different products, including watches, mobile phones and many digital household electronics. The need for MCUs is increasing, as the consumer market and global technologies shift toward digitization. The Internet of Things devices, “smart” household products and other digital devices will all rely on MCUs for their processing power as the demand for technologically advanced goods continues to rise – good news for Microchip.

 

Microchip offers a wide range of MCU products in its portfolio, including MCUs for analog peripherals, core independent peripherals, low-power products and more. If you’re interested in Microchip products, you can find a complete list of their solutions on their website.

 

C

See more news at:

http://twitter.com/Cabe_Atwell

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