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24 Posts authored by: Eavesdropper
In what could only be described as ‘fervent scientist madness’, researchers at Georgia Tech have developed a transistor with excellent stability and performance for use on plastic electronics. In addition, it can be manufactured at relatively low temperatures in a regular atmosphere. In the quest to develop flexible plastic electronics, one of the stumbling blocks has been creating transistors with enough stability for them to function in a variety of environments while still maintai ...
Researchers have invented a technique that uses inexpensive paper to make ‘microfluidic’ devices for rapid medical diagnostics and chemical analysis. Current lab-on-a-chip technology is relatively expensive because chips must be specifically designed to perform certain types of chemical analyses, with channels created in glass or plastic and tiny pumps and valves directing the flow of fluids for testing. But the chips, which are roughly palm-size or smaller, are difficult to design a ...
  The world of computing is in transition. As chips become smaller and faster, they dissipate more heat, which is energy that is entirely wasted. By some estimates the difference between the amount of energy required to carry out a computation and the amount that today's computers actually use, is some eight orders of magnitude. Clearly, there is room for improvement. One of the outside runners in the race to take the world of logic by storm is reversible computing. By that, computer scient ...
  Semiconductor Research Corporation and researchers from Stanford University have developed a novel combination of elements that yields a unique nanostructure material for packaging. This advance should allow longer life for semiconductor devices while costing less than current state-of-the-art materials. For semiconductors, the improvement will come in the form of packaging for devices. Presently, manufacturers must rely on tiny pins or thick solder to bond sections of the semiconductor i ...
The quantum computers of tomorrow might use photons to move data according to NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology). The new NIST papers address one of the many challenges to a practical quantum computer: the need for a device that produces photons in ready quantities, but only one at a time, and only when the computer's processor is ready to receive them. The first paper addresses the need to be certain that a photon is indeed coming when the processor is expecting it, and that ...
United Microelectronics Corporation has recently announced that the company has produced customer Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) sensor products, with volume production scheduled for this year. As MEMS sensor applications become increasingly popular, demand for CMOS-MEMS foundry services is also rapidly on the rise. One such product is a microphone that uses UMC's CMOS-MEMS technology has achieved successful function verification, with highly competitive specifications of above 56dBA fo ...
  Later this year, Hewlett-Packard researchers say, they expect to deliver to the U.S. Army a working prototype of what they're calling a "Dick Tracy wristwatch" — a lightweight, wearable device that soldiers in the field can use to view digital maps and other data on a flexible plastic screen that won't shatter or crack like glass. Though it will be spartan by design, researchers say HP's prototype could be one of the first in a new wave of products incorporating flexible electronic ...
  It was only a matter of time before science and alcohol were combined to create something great. Who knew that drinking and finding new ways to create superconductors would go hand-in-hand? It turns out a Japanese scientist took the time to conduct such an experiment, and it worked! Dr. Yoshihiko Takano of the National Institute for Materials Science in Tsukuba, Japan, made the discovery after a party, soaking samples of a potential superconductor in hot alcoholic drinks (I’m gonna ...
  Bi-focals have been around since the dawn of mankind and haven’t changed much since they were invented by Benjamin Franklin. However a company called PixelOptics has gone ahead and re-invented them with state of the art technology. Their new emPower line of glass lenses change prescription faster than in the blink of an eye. There are no moving parts and the change is virtually instantaneous. An invisible electronic add zone located about a half inch below the center of each lens ch ...

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