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7 Posts authored by: ZeroSizeObject
Graphene molecular model image. A new transistor made from graphene, the world's thinnest material, has been developed by a research team at the University of Southampton. The new transistor achieves a record high-switching performance which will make our future electronic devices, such as PDAs and computers, even more functional and high-performance. “Silicon CMOS downscaling is reaching its limits and we need to find a suitable alternative. Other researchers had looked at graphene as a ...
Gallium nitride material holds promise for emerging high-power devices that are more energy efficient than existing technologies, but these GaN devices traditionally break down when exposed to high voltages. Now researchers at North Carolina State University have solved the problem, introducing a buffer that allows the GaN devices to handle 10 times greater power. Previous research into developing high power GaN devices ran into obstacles, because large electric fields were created at specific p ...
  Smaller and more energy-efficient electronic chips could be made using molybdenite. EPFL's Laboratory of Nanoscale Electronics and Structures (LANES) published a study showing that this material has distinct advantages over traditional silicon or graphene for use in electronics applications. This mineral, which is abundant in nature, is often used as an element in steel alloys or as an additive in lubricants. But it had not yet been extensively studied for use in electronics. One of molyb ...
Taiwan-based handset ODM Compal Communications recently unveiled Robii, its first smart robot designed to accompany children aged 5-10, for sale under its own brand UrRobot, according to the company. Robii integrates image/voice recognition, sensors and projection technologies and features interactive learning and gamest based on multi-touch controls. Robii looks like a small monkey and can make more than 100 facial expressions using 170 LED chips and talks, and can track moving objects using bu ...
  Quantum applications, from cryptography to computation, all benefit from the use of entangled particles, (photons.) Creating and manipulating these photons is generally pretty straightforward, but storing them is not, which makes the issue of providing memory for a quantum computer a significant hurdle. It has been possible to successfully store some photons, but the media involved—single atoms or cold atomic gasses—aren't necessarily the most practical things to work with. In ...
  British defense tech firm BAE Systems is developing an active ‘e-camouflage’ system that will employ a form of electronic ink to project imagery of a vehicles surrounding terrain, rendering the vehicle somewhat invisible to potential attackers. Unlike conventional forms of camouflage, the images on the hull would change in concert with the changing environment always insuring that the vehicle remains disguised. The concept was developed as part of the Future Protected Vehicle ...
  A few unassuming drops of liquid locked in a very precise game of “follow the leader” could one day be found in mobile phone cameras, medical imaging equipment, implantable drug delivery devices, and even implantable eye lenses. Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute embedded drops of ferrofluid, a liquid infused with magnetic nanoparticles, into a thin substrate that was submerged in water. Then they exposed the device to a magnetic field to make one of the droplets ...

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