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FPGA Group

6 Posts authored by: jpiat
This blog is part 3 of a 4 part series of implementing a gradient filter on an FPGA.  If you have not already read the earlier parts see the link below to get up to speed before reading this blog.  Additionally the user can catch some of our previous blog posts, linked below.  Part 1 and 2 of this blog series Gradient Filter implementation on an FPGA - Part 1 Interfacing an FPGA with a camera Gradient Filter implementation on FPGA : Part 2 Implementing gradient Filter   Ot ...
This blog is part 2 of a 3 part series of implementing a gradient filter on an FPGA.  If you have not already read part2 see the link below to get up to speed before reading this blog.  Additionally the user can catch some of our previous blog posts, linked below.   Part1 of this blog series Gradient Filter implementation on an FPGA - Part 1 Interfacing an FPGA with a camera Other FPGA blogs by ValentF(x) An introduction to FPGAs and the LOGI FPGA Boards Obstacle detection ...
  previous post : Obstacle detection using Laser and image processing on LOGI-Bone FPGA Camera Data ProcessingThis is part 1 of a 2 part article which details interfacing a camera to an FPGA, capturing the data and then processing the data using a pipelining technique.  One of the many strengths of using an FPGA is the speed and flexibility it gives to processing data in a real-time manner.  An interface to a camera is a good example of this case scenario where cameras output v ...
The Problem  Typical obstacle detection on low cost mobile indoor robots are usually performed using a variety of sensors, namely sonar and infrared sensors. These sensors provide poor information that is only able to detect the presence of a reflective surface in the proximity of the sensor and the distance from the surface. While in most cases it’s enough to navigate a robot on a crowded floor, it does not help the robot for other tasks and adds more sensors to the robot. This does ...
Hardware description languages (HDLs) are a category of programming languages that target digital hardware design. These languages provides special features to design sequential logic( the system evolve over time represented by a clock) or combinational logic (the system output is a direct function of its input). While these language have proved to be efficient to design hardware, they often lack the tool support (editors are far behind what you can get to edit C/java/etc) and the syntax can be ...
Introduction   In a previous blog post ValentF(x) gave an explanation of what FPGAs (field programmable gate arrays) are and how they are a very valuable resource when designing electronics systems.  The article went on to describe the major differences in the way FPGAs operate from CPU/MCU technology.  Finally, it was highlighted that FPGAs, especially when used in conjunction with CPU technology, are a powerful tool with both having their own respective strong points in how th ...

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