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Power & Energy

13 Posts authored by: Jan Cumps Top Member
I'm selected for the STM32H7B3I-DK -  DISCOVERY KIT road test. I'm working on a touch screen GUI for my electronic load. In this post I'm trying a mock interface - see how I can switch between screens Thank you fellow roadtester jomoenginer for sending me a very good starting project.   image source: the mockup running in simulator mode on my laptop   Goal: Build an app with two screens, display data and info  I'm putting some light goals here. I've already checked oth ...
I received a preview of a light harvesting kit from Epishine and element14. Check my intro here. In this post, I'm checking the behaviour when you provide backup coin cell.     The setup is identical to the previous tests: 1.8 V output and 590 Ohm load. But with a 3 V coin cell added to extend the uptime.   source: annotated draft product brief   What this achieves is that, when the supercap voltage drops to 3.6 V, the circuit will use the coin cell energy to recharge ...
I received a preview of a light harvesting kit from Epishine and element14. Check my intro here. In this post, an analysis of the electronic properties. Charging, discharging, powering a load.   image source: my board, with probe wires soldered to the test points   The Test Conditions  I've set the output to 1.8 V. That's one of the voltages specified in Epishine's draft spec. Light conditions: my lab during daytime, on a bright summer noon. No direct sunlight or artificial ...
I got a preview of a light harvesting kit from Epishine and element14. Check my intro here. In this post, I try to analyse the ways of working. I don't have a schematic.It's based on google-research.         There are 3 main modules: the photovoltaic cell to turn light into electric energy energy harvesting IC with a super cap to collect and store the energy a variable buck regulator for the output voltage   Solar Cell: Epishine LEH3_50x50_6  The largest p ...
I got a preview of a light harvesting kit from Epishine and element14. It's a combination of a flexible solar cell and a energy collection circuit. I haven't used products from Epishine before and I'm not affiliated. I'm going to review the kit with open mind (and high excitement). I've reviewed microcontroller circuits that are designed to use harvested energy. This is the first time I have a power circuit that specialises in harvesting energy.   The Evaluation Kit  The kit is name ...
Inspired by Using a DC-DC Isolator to allow single power input to case? (and to stop hijacking that post) I'm checking the output noise of a Traco Power DC-DC converter. The  device I have is the TEN 6-4822WIN. It translates 48 V into +- 12 V. In this post, I'm using its +12 V to power my dc load in two situations: with and without fan.       I'm using a very naive approach, directly using the switcher output to power an analog circuit and the fan. And virtually no outpu ...
I'm reviewing a Gallium Nitrate step-down converter for Point of Load (PoL) high power conversion. In this post, I'm checking the sub-circuit that can inject an 8 A load pulse into the converter output. The injected load is steep and allows you to evaluate the response of the design to fast current demand rise and fall. For an explanation of the main DC converter, check the links at the end of this post.   The converter is designed to deliver high current, up to 50 A, at point of load. ...
The TI LED BoosterPack has some interesting power devices. There's a Buck converter, a low drop linear regulator, a few Boost converters with power MOSFETs. The board also has 8 RGB power LEDs and current sensing circuits. Enough interesting electronics to investigate. In this first post, an overview   History  This is one of the lesser known BoosterPacks. It's marketed for the C2000 family, although it can be used by any 3.3 V development board. The only requirements are PWM and ...
I'm reviewing a Gallium Nitrate step-down converter for Point of Load (PoL) high power conversion. This design is intended to deliver low voltage (0.5 - 1.5V) at a power hungry point of load. It can source 50A. With a switching frequency of 600 kHz, the footprint can stay small.   Part 1 gives a high-level overview of the design. The converter is interesting for more reasons than just being GaN. There are a few advanced switch-mode conversion patterns used in the evaluation kit. One ...
I'm reviewing a Gallium Nitrate step-down converter for Point of Load (PoL) high power conversion     This design is intended to deliver low voltage (0.5 - 1.5V) at a power hungry point of load. It can source 50A. With a switching frequency of 600 kHz, the footprint can stay small.     A 48V DC power bus is common in industrial environments. That voltage often needs to be converted to other levels. For high-performance processors, FPGAs and application specific ICs, this ...
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I'm reviewing an evaluation board for the TPS54A20 DC/DC converter from TI. This switcher is specific for low voltage designs. The output range is 0.5 - 2 V. That's a very narrow range. In that range it can deliver 10 A, with a typical input of 12 V.     Let's dig a little deeper into the "Two-phase, Synchronous Series Capacitor Buck Converter" design.     Series Capacitor Step-Down Converter The Buck converter uses a series capacitor to help stepping down the input vol ...
I received an evaluation board for the TPS54A20 DC/DC converter from TI. This switcher is specific for low voltage designs. The output range is 0.5 - 2 V. That's a very narrow range. In that range it can deliver 10 A, with a typical input of 12 V. Efficiency is in the lower-to-mid 80%. With a switch frequency of 2 MHz (more on that later) it allows for small passive components and a condensed footprint of the whole stepdown module.   The reason that I want to review this particular c ...