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Olympic athletes team up with Halo Sport for a new wearable tech that promises to improve their training. Can these headphones really reach your brainwaves and improve your training? (via Halo Neuro)   Is anyone else excited about the Summer Olympics starting in a week or so? You know I am. Check out what I did in 2012! I plan to cover all things tech for the Olympics coming up. Since, I'll be watching anyway.   When you want music on the go, headphone choice is very important. Whe ...
Smart stitches aim to send information straight to your doctor. A diagram of how smart stitches can be embedded in skin (Photo from Tufts University)   Thanks to constant advances in technology, there have been changes to make the medical field better and more efficient. But when you think about getting stitches, it sounds barbaric: you get a nasty cut and the doctor sews you up as if you just ripped your pants. As if that wasn't bad enough, you then have to return to get them taken out. ...
Tel Aviv Researchers recently developed a temporary ‘electronic tattoo’ as one of the first non-invasive assays to research muscle and nerve cell activity in patients. The technology may also revolutionize market research and data collection. (via Nature)   Temporary tattoos may have started as a fun pastime, but actually have practical implications now, thanks to Tel Aviv University researchers. The TAU research team recently developed a novel temporary ‘electronic tatto ...
A diagram from the patent Nest filed for the smart crib (image via Nest/USPTO)   If you're a fan of Tex Avery then you remember the “Home of Tomorrow” cartoons. These shorts showed off futuristic homes where dishes would wash themselves and robots would vacuum the floor. It's 2016 and while we have gadgets like Roomba to help around the house, we're still pretty far from a house that can take care of everything itself. But thanks to a new patent from Nest, we may be closer to ...
A research team from the University of Exeter recently published a paper that detailed a new methodology for T-ray imaging that will allow users to see through dense, opaque materials with twice the clarity as current processes. The technology could be developed to detect melanoma in future. (via Sciencemag.org)   What if you could test tiny microchips without having to open up complex devices? Or scan for melanoma long before current technologies can detect its presence? Terahertz radiati ...

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