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Singapore is beginning trials on several new technologies that could re-shape the way cities function, from traffic to health care. A screenshot of Virtual Singapore, a virtual simulation of the city designed to assist with everything from controlling traffic to possible pandemics (video via Dassault Systemes)   Singapore has the future. At least, digitized ways of monitoring traffic, health, and resource management, which will probably be a part of the future. Because it’s a wealth ...
A Hungarian startup is designing glasses that help visually impaired people by talking to them-but it has a long way to go. What a future prototype of EVA glasses will look like (Image via:  www.eva.vision)   There have been various prototypes developed over the years to assist the visually impaired. None, however, have yet included programming which reads words in the user’s environment-until now.   EVA, or Extended Visual Assistant, is a start-up based in Budapest, cons ...
Cabe Atwell

Wireless Spinal Rehab

Posted by Cabe Atwell Nov 23, 2016
A possible new therapy for paralysis involves transmitting neural signals from a neuroprosthetic device implanted in the brain to the motor nerves through a wireless relay. It will be years before this technology can be tested on humans.  A researcher demonstrates a prototype for restoring locomotion using a brain prosthetic and wireless transmitter (The Japan Times)   Restoring movement after spinal injury to motor nerves has driven much research in recent years. Currently, exosuits ...
The woman, who suffers from ALS, received an implanted brain computer to help regain some of her functionality after being fully paralyzed. Image shows a graphic of what the implant looks like and how it functions (Image via New England Journal of Medicine)   Brain implants have been in development for years. Medical science have been looking to them to treat those with paralysis and help them regain functionality. Thanks to a new development in the field, brain implants are going even far ...
Scientists at Imperial College London have created a USB stick that detects the HIV virus in the bloodstream and provides the resultsin less than 20 minutes. These scientists prove USB storage/sticks can do more than safely back up your files. (via Imperial College London)   Medical science has come a long way when it comes to treating HIV, but there’s still a ways to go. And despite all efforts there still isn’t a cure. While doctors are working hard at resolving this, a team ...

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