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This is the third and final step of producing a GEMMA bracelet which can have its LED pattern programmed using an NFC capable phone. In the previous 2 stages, I talked about putting together the hardware and producing an app which would communicate with the bracelet from the phone. Now we need to tie the two ends together.   Step 1 The first step is to produce a dummy or fake input and have the GEMMA process it and play the relevant pattern on the LEDs. To do this we'll set up a new sket ...
It's been a while since I last posted - I've had a lot of work to do with uni, but now I can continue writing this project up, and I hope you enjoy reading some more on it and hopefully learning.   Last time I wrote about soldering together the hardware to create an NFC based bracelet which will glow based on a phone pattern. Today I'm going to write about creating the code on an android device which will change the bracelet's pattern. I'll be using Android Studio, which you can download ...
Recently I embarked on a new project: creating a bracelet of LEDs. But not just any old bracelet. This one has the ability to be changed using a mobile phone, using a technology I've written about in the past called NFC.   Essentially the idea of this bracelet is: - Input a colour sequence in a phone app - put the dynamic NFC tag connected to the bracelet against your phone - turn on the bracelet. Bracelet reads the sequence from the tag and displays the pattern.   To do this we n ...
In the previous post, we decided to start making a floor piano using a FLORA and some other bits. Here we're going to improve on the code and make it more permanent! Step 3: improving the code Before we go any further into making the sensors a permanent installation, we should fix the bugs I mentioned in step 2. We're going to do this using an averaging algorithm which applies a low pass filter. Basically, this means that the baseline value of "pressed" or "not pressed" alters as time cont ...
This month I started working on a new project I'm naming Flor(a) piano. I don't know about older generations, but part of my childhood was dancing around on one of these: Also known as a child's floor piano. When I saw a couple of tutorials on Adafruit about using velostat to create step sensors, my inner child instantly thought back to playing on one of these, so I decided to try it out for myself.   The Kit List You will need the following: Electronics     - 1 Adafruit ...
As a Raspberry Pi hacker, one of the first things I looked at for my RIOTBoard was VNC, or Virtual Network Computing. Basically, the principle of VNC is to let you use one set of peripherals for multiple computers/microcomputers, with the extra computers being displayed as windows on the main system. This way you can control a device using your mouse/keyboard, and then flick back to your main computer to do debugging on an app, for example. Similar to SSH, where you have access to a device's com ...
I'll preface this by saying that I'm not an Android, nor a Java developer, nor am I a fan of either, particularly not after having written this app, and therefore, it's probably quite messy.   Now that we've got that out of the way, one application of the code we wrote to flash the RIOTBoard's onboard LED would be a Gmail notification light: you could modify this method to use any other mail provider as we're just using SMTP rather than the fully fledged library, by the by, as it's simpler ...
A few weeks back I was given the RIoTboard to play with. This is another single board computer with some fun stuff on it - Ethernet, USB, Camera interface, GPIO expansion including I2C, 2 onboard LEDs...yadayadayada.   The operating system initially on the device from the factory is Android: this causes some concerns with how accessible the GPIO is from Java since it's not commonplace for Java to be low level as well as high level, but as there are few completed tutorials for how to write ...
Last week I wrote about creating a web API using Windows Azure, ASP.Net and C#. This week we're going to plug this into our original pi passport class: as we have a layered system, this should be as simple as changing the data layer.   To recap, 2 weeks ago we had this:   Which pretty much does everything using 2 xml files: One which holds all data about an Achievement, and another which holds data about the person. Now that we have a web API, people will be stored on the intern ...
Previous tutorial links: one, two, three and four.   In the previous steps we covered creating Pi Passport machines as standalone systems – all data about the user, and the achievements, is stored on the pi itself. This is fine if you don’t want it to be accessible elsewhere, but for this project it’s better if we have it online: this makes it easy to share that you’ve been to a jam, beaten your friends achievement tallies etc. For this we need to create something ...
Previous tutorial links: one, two and three. In the last section of the PiPassport project we covered building a class with functionality for saving and loading people's NFC entries, and saving and loading what achievements they could pick up at each station.   After the last tutorial, your nfc.py file should be looking something like this: import nxppy import os,json,requests from xml.dom import minidom class NFC(object):            ...
See the first post: project introduction   Here I'm going to go through really simple set up with NFC, which I promise is dead quick, using Python as it's simplest. This assumes you know how to set your pi up, and have it all ready for putting code onto it using the internet, and communicating with it in some way in order to program. You will need: A Raspberry pi of any model and power supply An SD card or MicroSD card with raspbian installed Add-on board - Explore NFC from Farnell elem ...
I started on a new project recently, I'm naming Pi Passport. To give some credit to relevant parties, this was an idea I partially came up with - after a long twitter conversation with Craig and Ryan, we came up with the full idea:   Pi passport is intended to be a card you pick up at your first Raspberry Jam. You can then scan it on the NFC reader on the door, which will allow you to register, and then display how many achievements you've picked up from this scan. It's possible to have mul ...
See the first post: project introduction and the second: using the NXP NFC explorer board. Previously on this project I explained the topic, and how to get going quickly with NXP. In this post I’m going to cover how to build a class around the NFC idea and code, which will allow us to group together the bits we need – that is, data input and output, reading NFC cards and anything else we need along the way. We’ll start by making a really basic stub - enter in a pi terminal: ...