What happened before:

 

For almost a year I have a vintage turntable from Perpetuum Ebner at home.

It's not mine. It belongs to someone that asked me to fix it. And it turned out that fixing the motor would cost too much.

I asked the owner to collect the tt. That hasn't happened yet and the machine is collecting dust at my home.

 

So I'll take the freedom to attempt a non-intrusive repair with modern components. I'm also thinking about making it an Enchanted Objects Design Challenge.

 

In post 1 I present the turntable, talk about my previous repair attempts and brainstorm on some modding ideas.
In post 2 I'm measuring up the different gears, pulleys and wheels, and I calculate the speed of the original motor.

Post 3 is the first post on motor control. I'm reviewing the operation of the Infineon DC Motor Control Shield.

In post number 4  I'm using the enhanced PWM module of my The specified item was not found. Hercules LaunchPad to test drive the motor.

 

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The title of this post is a bit of a giveaway. I have the table spinning and got music out of it.

Here's an 8 seconds video showing the table connected to an amplifier,

The extract you hear is from a 1957 album of the Dutch singer Johnny Jordaan.

 

This is the prototype stage. As you can hear in the video down below, the motor is too noisy for a comfortable music experience.

I glued the motor to the chassis with hot glue. The motor isn't silent by itself, and the chassis amplifies the vibration.

I 'll have to make proper damped mounting with rubber.

I'll have to extend my firmware to allow speed adjustment. I'll use the duty cycle of the PWM signal to control the RPM.

Next is to use two buttons to speed the table up and down, and maybe store the last setting in flash. Then I'll work on a measure and feedback system to get drift under control.

 

In this video you can see my work to replace the motor and to connect up the Hercules Launchpad and Infineon Motor Driver.

 

The turntable is now in a state where I can start being inventive and add cyberfunctionality. The real fun can start.

 

Related posts
Vintage Turntable repair: Can I fix a Perpetuum Ebner from 1958 - part 1
Vintage Turntable repair: Can I fix a Perpetuum Ebner from 1958 - part 2 - Calculating the Motor Speed
Vintage Turntable repair: Can I fix a Perpetuum Ebner from 1958 - part 3 - Infineon Motor Driver shield
Vintage Turntable repair: Can I fix a Perpetuum Ebner from 1958 - part 4 - Hercules LaunchPad Enhanced PWM try-out
Vintage Turntable repair: Can I fix a Perpetuum Ebner from 1958 - part 6 - Speed Adjustment with Variable Duty Cycle
Vintage Turntable repair: Can I fix a Perpetuum Ebner from 1958 - part 7 - Make Speed Sensor from Scrap Parts
Vintage Turntable repair: Can I fix a Perpetuum Ebner from 1958 - part 8 - Sample the Motor Speed with Microcontroller