Skip navigation
Another blog about transistors. This time, I fancied looking at a circuit rather than the characteristics of a device, so I'm going to look a circuit known as the Schmitt trigger. This is named after O. H. Schmitt, though his original circuit was published in 1938 and predated transistors. It's not necessarily a very useful circuit any more in this particular transistor form, but it is interesting to look at it and understand what is going on - partly just for its own sake, but also because I'm ...
Another blog about transistors. As before, a quick qualification: this isn't teaching material, I'm just experimenting and following my curiosity where it might lead. It's all a bit ad-hoc and spontaneous - if I did it again it would be more organised, but then we'd lose the experimental flavour.   I'm going to repurpose the board I used for the switching experiments. This time the load will be a small solenoid I found in a box of old bits. It measures 53.16mH, 54.4ohms with the plunger ...
I've been getting interested in designing with transistors recently, so I thought I'd start blogging about some of the things that I'm doing as I learn. This blog is about using the transistor as a switch. Specifically, I'm going to look at how it behaves at high speed and at a couple of traditional methods for speeding up the switching (what I'm considering here isn't really an issue if you are switching a load slowly or something like that).   Here's the circuit diagram of my experimenta ...
This is part five of evaluating a TPS54A20 on an evaluation board. The TPS54A20 is a buck converter with an interesting topology - it has two phases merged with a switched-capacitor. This isn't a formal road test (I was given the board by jancumps, nice person that he is) and I'm just doing what interests me and blogging about it. Disclaimer: some of what I do here is quite sloppy and, to be fair to TI, it shouldn't be taken as a proper review.   This time I'm looking at the opera ...