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I thought I was going to do saturation next, but somehow I've diverted off into looking at the transistor as a diode. This came about from my referring to Bob Pease's book, Troubleshooting Analog Circuits, to look up something else and then thinking that I'd like to measure for myself the graph he shows of Vf against If for various diodes, including transistors connected as diodes.   A bipolar junction transistor contains two PN junctions, one between the base and the emitter (B-E) and o ...
A further blog in my series about transistors [I think I've given myself a lifetime job, mining this rich seam]. This one looks at the reverse breakdown of the base-emitter junction and one application of the transistor if it's used in this way [actually, I only know of one application, but no doubt D_Hersey will be along in a while to quote half a dozen from the Electropedia that sits inside his head].   On a datasheet the maximum figure for this junction is often given as 5V or 6V (fo ...
This blog is a continuation of   Transistors: Vce Breakdown   and it's probably best to read that one first. The idea for this one came out of helpful observations made by mcb1, dougw, and D_Hersey in the comments, so read those too.   I'm going to look in a bit more detail at protecting a bipolar junction transistor switching a relay. In that previous blog, I was using a solenoid as the inductive load, now I'm going to use a real relay. It's a relay intended for automotive us ...