Since I retired a couple years ago I have returned to my life long interest in electronics. What I have discovered is that I had not kept up with the technology. The manageable, through the hole, components that I was familiar with in the past have been replaced by something that is very small and solders directly to the surface of the board. Not wanting to miss out on playing with some of these really neat goodies I decided to begin to acquaint myself with the components and the new techniques I would need to learn. While I have been soldering for 55+ years I have seldom had to deal with the soldering of leads so closely spaced. To assist in trying the surface mounted chips I bought some Capital Advanced adapter boards from Newark Electronics and proceeded to attempt to solder the chips to them. The most difficult part was keeping the chip in place while I soldered the first leg. I was explaining to my very supportive wife how difficult it was not to disturb the position of the chip while soldering and in her usual intuitive way she volunteered to hold the chip with her finger while I soldered it. ( At this point she had not seen the size of the chip in question ,1.5mm x 2.5mm) While it was not practical for her to hold it, as usual she was right, what I needed was an extra finger.

 

I got together the following materials:

 

30 cm of bare 12 gauge copper wire

4 screws

piece of spring

6 cm of 3 mm brass tubing

 

20 minutes later after bending and soldering the pieces together I had cobbled together THE FINGER

 

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I got one of the Capital Advance boards out and an LM 3410 LED driver that I wanted to try out.

 

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I placed the IC on the board under THE FINGER. Once it was held down by the finger I made the minor adjustments needed to position it properly.

 

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Now all that was left was the still challenging job of soldering the legs of the LM 3410 to the board.

 

Final product:

 

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Now all that was left was to plug the LM 3410 LED Driver into a breadboard and wire up the circuit to see if it really would drive 5 series LEDs off of a 3.3 volt supply as advertised.

 

Not much to look at but it works as advertised.

 

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Good Night Guys 1:10 AM