Skip navigation
     Very often it so happens in sensing-actuation based projects that an embedded system must take a certain action when the value of a sensed parameter is above a certain threshold. The most basic method of handling such a control loop is by hard coding a threshold or a set point. Then, for the embedded system, it becomes a binary decision. A High and a Low, even for analog inputs. However, one of the problems caused by this method is that the threshold does not change with ...
       One of the first projects I did when I got my Intel Edison in my third year of engineering, was to try and make a home security system. I had seen a lot of people make many varieties in this theme. You had your infra red tripwires, overhead PIR proximity sensors, all which did the job pretty well. What I found a bit lackluster was the actuation bit. An LED, a Buzzer or may be the odd LCD screen with "INTRUDER!" flashing in the ubiquitous black-over-green. Given t ...
    1. ThingSpeak :  Thingspeak was the first service I used to connect my device with the Internet, so maybe that's why it's first in the list. Considering the ones I used later on, ThingSpeak had perhaps the easiest learning curve to get exactly what I wanted from a web service. To upload data, store it, see it, and read it from another place. It allows you to have different channels to read data from different sensors from the same device.   It utilizes a RESTful API lik ...
  If on the off chance that you are like me, you're an Instrumentation Engineer, "Jack of all trades" would probably be a very good description of your skills. The "Master of none" part though, is a bit iffy. It's in the four years that an Instrumentation Engineer spends studying his curriculum  that he must convert the "Master of none" part to "Master of one". At least.   I can discuss diodes with my friends from the Electronics branch, I am able to contemplate compilers with th ...