1 2 3 Previous Next 65 Replies Latest reply on Nov 18, 2015 7:44 AM by rakshitha

    100 Projects in 100 Days

    vandana

      Cypress and element14 are excited to start a new community initiative around the PSoC 4 Pioneer Kit - 100 Projects in 100 Days.

      new_PPC.jpg

       

      Over the next several weeks, we will post a new PSoC Creator project everyday, designed specifically for the PSoC 4 Pioneer KitPSoC 4 Pioneer Kit (CY8CKIT-042).

      These projects will be posted daily (Monday though Friday) to the element14 community along with simple instructions on how to use them, what expansion boards are needed, and a few notes on the project design itself.

      For the community, these projects are as simple as program-and-play, and will turn into an extensive library of PSoC 4 Pioneer Kit design examples that work with many 3rd party exapansion boards including Arduino shields and Digilent Pmod daughter cards - allowing you to create the design you need, and interface with the hardware you want.

       

      For a list of all projects released click here


      To get started with these PSoC 4 Pioneer Kit community example projects -

       

      Step 1     Buy the $25 PSoC 4 Pioneer KitPSoC 4 Pioneer Kit 

       

      Step 2     Download the latest version of PSoC Creator and the required kit software files from www.cypress.com/cy8ckit-042 

       

        • Existing PSoC Creator users - download only the Kit-042 files (you can update to PSoC Creator 2.2 SP1 using the built-in Cypress Update Manager)

       

      KIT WEBSITE.png

      Step 3  A. Download the community projects posted here (each project is an individual .zip file)    

                   B. Extract the contents of project .zip file to your computer

       

      EXTRACT ZIP.png

       

      Projects Released


       

      S NoDateProject Title
      101-May-2013Simple Blinking LED
      202-May-2013CapSense Slider Example
      303-May-2013PSoC 4 Pioneer Kit Annotation Library
      406-May-2013USB-UART utility
      507-May-2013USB-I2C Utility
      608-May-2013Danger Shield with Light Sensor Control
      709-May-2013Danger Shield with 7-segment display
      810-May-2013Danger Shield Buzzer of Doom
      913-May-2013Graphics LCD Display
      1014-May-2013LCD - Rotating Cube Demo
      1115-May-2013GLCD Paddle Game
      1216-May-2013Pioneer Board Oscilloscope
      1317-May-2013CapSense Button & LED Control with Bridge Control Panel
      1420-May-2013What was the value? - LED Memory Example
      1521-May-2013CapSense Proximity Detection
      1622-May-2013Proximity Theremin
      1723-May-20132-Channel OScope with GraphicsLCD
      1824-May-2013'Catch the Shells' Game with ColorLCD Shield
      1928-May-2013LED Memory! Part Deux. Just Deux it!
      2029-May-2013Starter Designs
      2130-May-2013Fractional Frequency Synthesizer
      2231-May-2013“Kill The Ghost” Game
      2303-Jun-2013tinyprintf Example
      2404-Jun-2013XBee Router Loopback Example
      2505-Jun-2013XBee Direct IO
      2606-Jun-2013XBee API RxTx Example
      2707-Jun-2013XBee RGB CapSense Control
      2810-Jun-2013“WiFi? Why Not!” Arduino WiFi Shield Example
      2911-Jun-2013Bluetooth Home Automation System
      3012-Jun-2013Bluetooth with GLCD
      3113-Jun-2013Ethernet Shield
      3214-Jun-2013More Relay!
      3317-Jun-2013Sweet Music Everywhere! MIDI Shield
      3418-Jun-2013Resistive Touch Example
      3519-Jun-2013UART, I2C, and SPI Joystick Example
      3620-Jun-2013What? I can use the PSoC 5LP too?
      3721-Jun-2013PSoC With Friends! Word Scramble Game
      3824-Jun-2013Ultrasonic Distance Measurement
      3925-Jun-2013Two PWMs for the price of one
      4026-Jun-2013Pioneer PnP Sensors
      4127-Jun-2013Thermistor Example
      4228-Jun-2013Hangman Game
      4301-Jul-2013Rise of the Machines (Rolling Robot)
      4402-Jul-2013Run Away Run Away! (Proximity Robot)
      4503-Jul-2013Stepper Motor Example
      4605-Jul-2013“Paint The Night” Accelerometer Example
      4708-Jul-2013Obstacle Avoider Robot
      4809-Jul-2013Walk The Line! Robot Example
      4911-Jul-2013Android Device Controlled Robot
      5012-Jul-2013SD Card Example

      S No

      DateProject Title
      5115-Jul-2013Music Player
      5216-Jul-2013Strike A Pose! Digital Camera
      5317-Jul-2013PSoC Eye
      5418-Jul-2013Custom Component 4x4 Keypad
      5519-Jul-2013Parallel to Serial UDB Component
      5622-Jul-2013Accelerometer Level
      5723-Jul-2013Digital Audio From A Single Pin
      5824-Jul-2013An Introduction to Processing
      5925-Jul-2013But Wait There’s More! Single PWM with 3 Outputs
      6026-Jul-2013PSoC 4 Mini-Billboard
      6129-Jul-2013Nokia 5110 LCD Interface
      6230-Jul-2013Ready…Set…GO! PSoC Stopwatch
      6331-Jul-2013Some Like it Hot! PSoC Thermostat
      6401-Aug-2013Workspace Organization using PSoC Theromostat
      6502-Aug-2013New to PSoC or the Pioneer Kit? START HERE!
      6605-Aug-2013LED Blinky Revisited
      6706-Aug-2013PSoC 4 Getting Started Lab 1 (LED Blinky)
      6807-Aug-2013PSoC 4 Getting Started Lab 2 (PWM LED)
      6908-Aug-2013PSoC 4 Getting Started Lab 3 (CapSense UART)
      7009-Aug-2013PSoC 4 Getting Started Lab 4 (ADC)
      7112-Aug-2013Get Your Motor Runnin’!
      7213-Aug-2013TFT Touchscreen Shield
      7314-Aug-2013TFT Touchscreen Tic-Tac-Toe Game
      7415-Aug-2013PSoC Creator Training 110
      7516-Aug-2013PSoC Creator Training 111                                          
      7619-Aug-2013PSoC Creator Training 112
      7720-Aug-2013PSoC Creator Training 113
      7821-Aug-2013PSoC Creator Training 210
      7922-Aug-2013PSoC Creator Training 211
      8023-Aug-2013PSoC Creator Training 212/213/214
      8126-Aug-2013NFC/RFID Shield
      8227-Aug-2013RFID Reader and Writer Project #2
      8328-Aug-2013Raspberry Pi Integration
      8429-Aug-2013State Machines in PSoC 4
      8530-Aug-2013UART Bootloader in PSoC 4
      8603-Sep-2013GPS Algorithm
      8704-Sep-2013Gas Sensor Example
      8805-Sep-2013Simulation of Gas Sensor Example
      8906-Sep-2013GPS Example
      9009-Sep-2013Comparator Example
      9110-Sep-2013Infrared Remote Control
      9211-Sep-2013Serial Communications Examples
      9312-Sep-20134 Channel Multiplexed Comparator
      9413-Sep-2013Opamp Dynamic Gain
      9516-Sep-2013Hibernate and Stop Power Modes
      9617-Sep-2013P4 Light Sensor Project Design
      9718-Sep-2013Rice Cooker
      9819-Sep-2013Thermal Printer
      9920-Sep-2013I2C Pass Though 'Smart Wire'
      10023-Sep-2013PSoC 4 Time Square Billboard
        • 1. Re: 100 Projects in 100 Days
          shabaz

          Hi Vandana,

           

          Can we request some from Cypress if they've not thought up all 100 yet? :-) I can think of some ones that require a good mix of analog and digital and software, but I'm not experienced with PSoC platform to know if these are feasible.

          For example:

          1.metal detector

          2. PC-controlled curve tracer with current source and with voltage source, for BJT and FET

          3. inductance meter with adjustable choice of freq

          4. Some charge measurement device (maybe somehow using capsense?)

          5. logging device to capture analog readings via serial port to the PC and ability to set gain via PC, and a current source (so we can optionally log temperature with an RTD).

          • 2. Re: 100 Projects in 100 Days
            vandana

            Thanks, Shabaz. We definitely are looking for project ideas that would help enable application development!

             

            If you havent ordered a kit yet, I would recommend you to buy the PSoC 4 Pioneer KitPSoC 4 Pioneer Kit (these should be in stock by next week) and test these projects and contribute your own too

            • 3. Re: 100 Projects in 100 Days
              shabaz

              Oh!; ) I'll try to experiment virtually, and maybe pick #1 from the list for now .

              • 4. Re: 100 Projects in 100 Days
                cypkees

                Hey Shabaz, its not specifically for the Pioneer kit (it uses PSoC 3 or PSoC 5LP) but # 3 has been addressed: http://www.cypress.com/?app=forum&id=2492&rID=76890

                 

                Its a full on LCR meter with adjustable frequency.

                • 5. Re: 100 Projects in 100 Days
                  DAB

                  I really like this approach.

                  The easiest way to get people to use your product is to provide them with ideas and tested solutions so that they can see the power of your device.

                   

                  I will keep an eye on the posts.  Who knows, I might even be talked into buy one an playing with it.

                   

                  Great idea,

                  DAB

                  • 6. Re: 100 Projects in 100 Days
                    morgaine

                    It looks like a very nice board.  Pity that those of us who run Linux can't play.

                     

                    It seems so bizarre to me that a company whose main product is semiconductor devices (not software) deliberately reduces its customer base by playing favorites on operating systems.  It's just sheer blinkeredness and incompetence to not write development software in a portable manner so that people can use their chips regardless of which operating system they happen to use.

                     

                    Vandana, if you're in contact with Cypress, you might like to pass this comment along to them.

                     

                    Morgaine.

                    • 7. Re: 100 Projects in 100 Days
                      cypkees

                      It wasn't done out of spite for other operating systems or anything so diabolical : )  We want to go cross platform, We know its important, but we have man-decades (maybe even man-centuries) of effort in our existing tools, built on a windows platform.  Is it perfect?  Of course not.  Its going to take a lot of work to redo the tools to make them cross platform like they should be.

                       

                      I guess I just want you to know, we do hear you, and we are working to address it.  Or at least, I hear you : )

                      • 8. Re: 100 Projects in 100 Days
                        Drew Fustini

                        Thanks, as a full-time Linux user, that's to good to hear.  I'll second Morgaine's comment that the board does look very interesting but I'm unlikely to try it out until it's compatible with Linux.

                        • 9. Re: 100 Projects in 100 Days
                          morgaine

                          Thanks Chris, it's good to know that someone is listening.

                           

                          In case additional ammunition is needed to convince beancounters, it's worth pointing out that among the many millions of Linux desktop users, the proportion with technical backgrounds or interests is enormously higher than for Windows or Mac.  The Linux/Unix world grew largely through word of mouth within communities devoted to science, technology and higher education, and this has given it a very different demographic to operating systems with a user base in office and media consumption and/or general use.

                           

                          This bias towards technical pursuits greatly offsets Linux's lower numbers for official "market share" in desktop operating systems, and makes catering to the needs of this community very much in the interest of SoC and board suppliers.  It really is strategic.

                           

                          Morgaine.

                          • 10. Re: 100 Projects in 100 Days
                            michaelkellett

                            While I agree that it's nice if tools support Linux as well as Windows I can't believe that its (currently) a show stopper for anyone seriously interested in PSOCs - it's not that expensive to buy a Windows license and dual boot if you only have one computer and there are so many occasions when you just have to use Windows to interact with third parties (customers, suppliers whatever) that running both OSes is just a fact of life.

                             

                            Having said that it looks to me as if Microsoft is becoming less and less interested in what I call "Technical computing"  - so much so that I guess by the time we reach Windows 10 by far the majority of technical tools will run first on Linux with Windows as the poor relation - so it's definitely time for Cypress and others in the same boat to start work on that mountain of legacy code

                             

                            MK

                            • 11. Re: 100 Projects in 100 Days
                              morgaine

                              Michael Kellett wrote:

                               

                              While I agree that it's nice if tools support Linux as well as Windows I can't believe that its (currently) a show stopper for anyone seriously interested in PSOCs - it's not that expensive to buy a Windows license and dual boot if you only have one computer and there are so many occasions when you just have to use Windows to interact with third parties (customers, suppliers whatever) that running both OSes is just a fact of life.

                               

                              A fact of your life, perhaps, but I don't pretend to speak for you.  Please don't pretend to speak for those Linux users for whom your comment is totally inappropriate.  A very large number of them do not share your lack of commitment to open operating systems nor your willingness to use a to-them inferior commercial product as "a fact of life".  No, it's not "a fact of life".  That's just your personal worldview.

                               

                              A comment like "it's not that expensive to buy a Windows license" is as inappropriate as trying to force a Windows user to run Linux, or an iPhone user to run Android, or any other combination.  People use whichever operating system suits them best, and having perfected their use and understanding of it, there could be nothing more ludicrous than asking them to dual boot into some other system.  No thank you, the extra maintenance and the security headaches would make that an extremely unwise choice, even when money is no barrier.

                               

                              A product that isn't multiplatform and is incompatible with Linux most frequently just won't get purchased at all, and for very good reason.  It doesn't support the environment in which they are most comfortable, most productive, and most secure.

                               

                              Morgaine.

                              • 12. Re: 100 Projects in 100 Days
                                michaelkellett

                                @Morgaine,

                                 

                                I note your response - your tone is such that I shall not respond.

                                 

                                MK

                                • 13. Re: 100 Projects in 100 Days
                                  morgaine

                                  Michael Kellett wrote:

                                   

                                  I note your response - your tone is such that I shall not respond.

                                   

                                  Content is much more important than tone, and unfortunately the content of your message was very detrimental to the request for Linux compatibility being made in this thread.  It showed total lack of understanding and support for computer users whose sole operating system is Linux.  Your "it's not that expensive to buy a Windows license" was insensitive at best.

                                   

                                  Since you were not able to put yourself in their shoes, deciding not to respond is clearly for the best, since any defence of your earlier advice would not help them at all.

                                   

                                  Morgaine.

                                  • 14. Re: 100 Projects in 100 Days
                                    John Beetem

                                    Chris Keeser wrote:

                                     

                                    It wasn't done out of spite for other operating systems or anything so diabolical : )  We want to go cross platform, We know its important, but we have man-decades (maybe even man-centuries) of effort in our existing tools, built on a Windows platform.  Is it perfect?  Of course not.  Its going to take a lot of work to redo the tools to make them cross platform like they should be.

                                     

                                    I guess I just want you to know, we do hear you, and we are working to address it.  Or at least, I hear you : )

                                    I would like to start by saying that I really like the PSoC4/5 silicon capabilities, especially the Digital System.  I've been looking forward to playing with this architecture since it was first announced in 2009.  More on this later.

                                     

                                    Regarding the immediate topic at hand, I appreciate the difficulty of porting a Windows application to GNU/Linux if it wasn't designed for portability from the beginning.  The Linux kernel is complex, but it's well-engineered and maintained by people who are committed to having it work reliably.  However, the GUI level is kind of all over the place and varies between distros.  From what I can tell, there really isn't a GUI standard so if you want portability you use X Windows (X11) and hope that the particular distro does a good job of implementing it or provide a reliable adaptation layer for whatever it's using for graphics.  For example, my XXICC software (see my link if you're interested) works fine on Raspberry Pi under Debian "Squeeze", but Ubuntu 11.10 misbehaves drawing diagonal lines and arcs.  Xilinx deals with the GNU/LINUX distro problem by only supporting Fedora (the last time I looked) so if you run it on anything else you'll be relying on community support.

                                     

                                    My XXICC runs on both Windows and X11, and it's challenging.  I solve the problem using an intermediate layer called G-SWIM (GalaxC Simplified Windows Manager).  This is a use of David Wheeler's: "All problems in computer science can be solved by another level of indirection".  My application programs call G-SWIM for graphics, which in turn calls the underlying windows manager (Windows or X11 for now).

                                     

                                    It was quite challenging to get copy/paste working well on both Windows and X11, because they do it in quite different ways.  And I never could figure out how to print directly from a GNU/Linux program, so I just generate a PDF and require the user to print it using "lpr" or an PDF reader.  This is OK for work-in-progress software like XXICC, but you'd like something more seamless for a final product.

                                     

                                    Plus, if you need to access custom hardware such as a device programmer, you'll get to explore the netherworld of device drivers.

                                     

                                     

                                    Getting back to PSoC4 and PSoC5, I first heard about PSoC5 at a Xilinx/Avnet XFEST in October 2009 and thought it was a cute chip from the marketing flyer.  Then I heard TJ Rogers talk about it at ARM Techcon later that month, and I was very excited by the chip's capabilities, especially the Digital System.  Reading the TRM got me even more excited, especially since it seemed on a first reading that everything was accessible through documented registers and that after asking cranky questions for decades I'd finally have something I've always wanted: a programmable logic device I could program myself rather than being forced to use the vendor's software and EULA.

                                     

                                    Well, I found out a few months later that PSoC5 isn't all documented: while you have full control of the programming of Universal Digital Blocks and other blocks, the documentation won't tell you how to connect to them.  This was quite discouraging and I felt like Alice in Wonderland when she looked through the tiny doorway at "loveliest garden you ever saw" but was too large to fit through.  Every six months or so I review the TRMs chez Cypress and I'm still locked out.  Now maybe this is all documented somewhere in an app note or hard-to-find wiki (please, please, please point me there!), but from what I can tell I'm locked out and the only way to use PSoC4/5 is PSoC Creator.  In that case PSoC4/5 gives me no advantage over Xilinx FPGAs.

                                     

                                    Now back to GNU/Linux.  When Chris says "it's going to be a lot of work to redo the tools to make them cross platform", there's a really obvious solution:  Release the documentation for PSoC routing, and the Open Source Software world will do the work for you.  Intel doesn't have to write their own compilers -- others happily do it for them.  ARM doesn't either.  Neither does MIPS or PowerPC.  Xilinx and Altera have chosen to write all their own software, and IMO that's prevented them from being the next Intel or ARM.

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