11 Replies Latest reply on Jan 11, 2014 6:54 AM by hughdarwen

    boot failure, timeout waiting for hardware interrupt

    hughdarwen

      I've acquired a brand new RaspberryPi/8GB-USD and set it up with the recommended OS, Raspbean.  Booting occasionally works, so I am familiar with the desktop, but mostly it fails and I just have to retry by switching the power off and on.

       

      The error seems to be connected with the lower of the two USB ports and I get it regardless of which device (keyboard or mouse) I plug in to that port. In response to hidraw2: USB HID v1.10 Device USB Keyboard1 on usb-_usb1.3/Input1bcm2700 I get nnc0: Timeout waiting for hardware interrupt - cmd25 followed by Timeout waiting for hardware interrupt - cmd12.

       

      I've noticed that when I plug into the bottom USB port it doesn't go in quite as far as when I plug into the top port.  Is there any chance that I've been given a faulty kit?

       

      Hugh

        • Re: boot failure, timeout waiting for hardware interrupt
          Roger Wolff

          I suspect that the error is about "mmc0". This is the SD card.

           

          Can you find a different SD card to test on short notice? I'd suggest that you do that!

           

          The raspberry pi is quite tolerant of its input voltage. However, Micro USB cables are often sold that have a resistance that result in a way too low voltage. Sometimes this can cause problems. Check the voltage at the raspberry pi (TP1 and TP2). The SD card is supposed to run at 3.3V, leaving quite somar margin before things go wrong if the 5V is not enough. But in fact, the 3.3V dropping too low is the first sign of "not enough power".

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          • Re: boot failure, timeout waiting for hardware interrupt
            iagorubio

            If you get mmc0 errors, it's most likely you got your card's data corrupted. That can happen for switching it on and off, instead of using the halt command of the "power off" menu entry in the graphical desktop.

             

            MMC stands for Multi Media Card and mmc0 is the 1st card on the system - if there were two the following one would be mmc1 and so on.

             

            I don't think it have anything to do with the USB ports.

             

            I would first try to buy a new card and put Raspbian on it again to try. If with a new one fails I would then check for what can be causing it.

             

            Take care there are many bad cards in the market.

             

            Try to buy one of those: RPi SD cards - eLinux.org

            1 of 1 people found this helpful
              • Re: boot failure, timeout waiting for hardware interrupt
                Roger Wolff

                "data corruption" by turning off the power should lead to file system errors. But in this case there are hardware problems: the expected interrupt does not happen. I haven't seen that happen by suddenly turning off the power.

                 

                Anyway, a full wipe of the SD card and a re-image might help, new SD card, check the power.

                • Re: boot failure, timeout waiting for hardware interrupt
                  hughdarwen

                  Thanks for saying this has nothing to do with USB ports.  I just copied down the message immediately preceding the first mmc0 message and assumed the mmc0 had something to do with that.

                   

                  So it's the SD card or the voltage.  My power adapter is 5.0V and the cable is 3m long.  I used recovery mode to reinstall Raspbian, so I don't think there's any data corruption.  Once I have booted successfully I haven't (yet) run into any problems.

                   

                  Hugh

                    • Re: boot failure, timeout waiting for hardware interrupt
                      Roger Wolff

                      The raspberry pi can draw up to 700mA. This is more than what USB cable manufacturers are told to expect. (USB spec says max 500mA.)

                       

                      Besides that, some cables are manufactured for a specific product where it is known in advance that the current draw will be even less.


                      SD card activity and current draw can both peak during booting, providing an explanation for the "it only happens during booting".

                        • Re: boot failure, timeout waiting for hardware interrupt
                          hughdarwen

                          So I acquired a new power adapter from CPC, billed as a Raspberry Pi Power Supply, 5V, 1A, UK RPI-PSU-UK-MK1 but got the same problem.  At the same time I bought a 7-port USB hub with its own power supply, so for my next attempt I plugged that in and connected the keyboard and mouse to it.  To my surprise, when I switched on the power supply to the USB hub, without also switching on the power supply to the Raspberry Pi, the thing booted up with no more cmm0 timeouts.  However, the mouse and keyboard weren't recognised, so I couldn't do anything and had to switch off.

                           

                          Any ideas?

                           

                          Hugh

                            • Re: boot failure, timeout waiting for hardware interrupt
                              Roger Wolff

                              So... we have determined that your problems are likely power-related.


                              The 7 port hub that I have has a power supply that I find a bit wimpy for a 7-port hub. (i.e. it cannot deliver the 3.5A it is supposed to be able to). I'm not sure I'd trust it to power my 'pi.

                               

                              Could it be that your 3m Cable between your "raspberry pi power supply" and the 'pi is too long? In my experience the supplies intended for the 'pi are good enough, but that could be ruined by a bad cable.

                               

                              Do you have a model A, so just one USB socket?

                               

                              Oh, One thing you can test: Power the pi with a micro USB cable from the hub to the power connector on the 'pi. You know the hub-powersupply is capable of booting the pi without problems....

                                • Re: boot failure, timeout waiting for hardware interrupt
                                  hughdarwen

                                  Thanks again for the quick reply.

                                   

                                  My Pi is a model B with 2 USB ports.  My new power adapter has a shorter cable, 2m.

                                   

                                  When I boot up with the USB hub in port 1, mouse in port 2, and keyboard in port 5 on the hub, I see a message recognising the mouse and another recognising "new USB device", but nothing recognising the keyboard that's connected to that "new USB device" (the hub).

                                   

                                  I can actually get going now, by unplugging the hub and plugging the keyboard into port 1, so in a sense the hub has solved the power supply problem.  But I didn't buy the hub just to get enough power!

                                   

                                  I noted you tip about connecting the hub to the Pi's power input but I don't have a suitable cable for that.

                                   

                                  I looked at /boot/config.txt to see if there was anything I needed to do there but couldn't find anything.  (I'm fairly computer-savvy, having been a professional programmer for over 30 years until retirement, but I have no previous experience of Linux.)

                                   

                                  Hugh

                                  • Re: boot failure, timeout waiting for hardware interrupt
                                    hughdarwen

                                    I overlooked your point about power supply to the USB hub.  It came with the product (from CPC) and is billed as 5V, 1amp, just like the adapter for the Pi itself.

                                     

                                    Hugh