6 Replies Latest reply on Jun 3, 2014 6:50 AM by dougw

    Novice in trouble

    billyoung

      Hi all. I'm a retired mechanic and have VERY little knowledge in the magic that is electronics. So I'm throwing myself on to you good people who can maybe help me out.

         I hate throwing stuff away that could easily be repaired with a little bit of effort. I was given a golf trolley last year that didn't work. It has a module with a circuit board inside that looks like it has got wet at some time. I've tested the transistors (only 3) and found 1 of them has blown. The numbers on it are HO1 and YM3045N. I've tried to find one on the net but failed. Is there a way of finding an equivalent. From my limited knowledge it looks like it controls the voltage to the motor. Secondly would water getting into it be enough to blow it or should I look for a popped diode or something as well?..... Thanks in advance ... Bill

        • Re: Novice in trouble
          hamptonjmoore

          Hello sir, Newark Element 14 should have the transistor you are looking for but if not you could purchase another NPN transistor with high tolerance so you could be certain that it could handle the power you are applying to it. 

            • Re: Novice in trouble
              billyoung
              Thank you Hampton for your reply. You and Shabaz have added to my confusion. Shabaz has said it is a Dual Rectifier and you a NPN transistor (Which is what I thought it was)... This thing works from a 12V battery so it doesn't have a great deal of power. The replacement I am after would need to be the same shape a the old one and handle the same power. There is another transistor adjacent to this one which I have the feeling works in conjunction with the blown one. Would I need to change both to a higher rating?...Thank you again ....Bill
            • Re: Novice in trouble
              shabaz

              A google search reveals that the YM.. identifier is a dual rectifier, not a transistor. Water could have damaged bits of the circuit. What's worse, if it was powered up while wet, then yes there could be more serious damage. If there is a programmed device on board then if that is damaged there is almost no hope of repair without the manufacturer's help. Perhaps it didn't work before the water damage, in which case there is even more guesswork.

              It may be difficult to repair without some test equipment and electronics knowledge, and even then it might not be possible without manufacturer support. Not really sure what more can be said, engineering is a huge topic (can take years of study) and without more information it's hard to advise much. If there are things that are clearly faulty (e.g. burned tracks, fuses blown etc) then sometimes visual inspection can help, and an approximate idea what each area of the board might do, and the problem symptoms based on visual inspection and some measurements.

              1 of 1 people found this helpful
                • Re: Novice in trouble
                  billyoung

                  Thank you for your reply shabaz... I have checked the parts of this board that I can. Diodes resisters etc and can't fault them. It has a small I.C that I don't know how to check and wouldn't know how to replace anyway. I am working on the theory, if it only costs me a couple of £'s to try a new (Dual Rectifier???? I don't know what that is) part then I don't mind trying. I have looked on a site that shows how to test this part and there are no connections within. My little knowledge of such things tells me that a replacement is prolly available. As I said it was given to me and I hate seeing things wasted so I haven't lost anything i trying to repair it. Another answer on here suggests it is a NPN transistor. which is what I first assumed it was. Is a dual rectifier the same?...Or am I just being DUMB?

                • Re: Novice in trouble
                  shabaz

                  Hi Bill,

                   

                  With no knowledge of the circuit, you can try replacing out bits that look faulty, and as you say the cost is not a lot so may be worth it.

                  If you're looking for a near-similar replacement for any part (i.e. if you cannot obtain an exact replacement), then consulting part information in data sheets is usually mandatory and this can be tricky without knowing what the parts are doing (it's not a question of just comparing size and power - there are maybe 50 different parameters, and some of these parameters will need to meet certain requirements for your circuit, and some will be irrelevant - depends on the circuit). The circuit here may be quite low-tech and at 12V supply you may get away with it if you just select based on power, but you might not.

                   

                  Anyway, the YM.. identifier first hit on google is a dual rectifier which is not the same as a transistor. If the first hit is to be believed then if you think this part is faulty, it needs to be replaced with another dual rectifier, not a transistor.

                  • Re: Novice in trouble
                    dougw

                    Hi Bill,

                    What is the make and model of the trolley?

                    There is quite a bit of information on the net about some models - including manuals, replacement parts, circuit cards and subsystems.

                    Can you post a picture of the circuit card in question?