10 Replies Latest reply on Jul 7, 2020 9:58 AM by ibagadget

    Complete noob needs help with Pi3 components for Pipboy

    ibagadget

      Slightly overwhelmed here with all the info on this board.

       

      Quick synopsis - Been a huge Fallout fan for many years, and just recently had a friend give me the 3D printed Fallout Pipboy 3000 and the Pi3 board w/screen that goes in it. I have no idea what I'm doing. I watched the Element 14 video on the 2000 Mk II build, and I like some of the accessories that he put into his build. I would like to do something similar, with the GPS location tracking, menu switching, environmental readout and music playing (possibly from an attached USB drive?)

       

      I have never even held a Pi3 before this, let alone put one together and programmed it. Any assistance in what components I need to get, as well as where to find coding resources would be greatly appreciated.

       

      Owen

        • Re: Complete noob needs help with Pi3 components for Pipboy
          Christopher Stanton

          ibagadget get it working and running first, then fit it together and see how much room you have left to add anything extra.

           

          Your Pi with SDCard can host the music, you don't particularly need a USB storage for that, but you can add it.

           

          Additional sensors can be connected directly to your GPIO pins when it comes to it, including GPS. It depends what software you're running

           

          Plug it up and set it up first, then see where you go from there?

           

          Let us know.

          2 of 2 people found this helpful
            • Re: Complete noob needs help with Pi3 components for Pipboy
              ibagadget

              Thank you Christopher.

              I do have a bit of an update that I hope doesn't affect things too much - I was mistaken in which unit I had. It's actually a Pi2 board. The guy I got it from put it in a Pi3 box just for something to hold it, and I hadn't looked too closely at the board. I hope it still has the functionality and processing capability for what I'd like to do. If it doesn't, then I guess I'll just go with the currently available program made for this unit.

              If it will handle more peripherals, then that is awesome, but also leads to my next question:

               

              Can you point me in the right direction as to what are the most economical GPS and Weather sensor chips to get that will work with this? Need rotary switches, speaker, and power management board as well. I have access to RC Helicopter batteries, so I can use those for power, just need to be able to convert voltage to the proper output for the board and peripherals.

               

              Did I mention that I've never done this before?

               

              Once I can get all the components lined up, I think I can find someone locally that can walk me through connecting everything and (hopefully) getting it all to work.

                • Re: Complete noob needs help with Pi3 components for Pipboy
                  Christopher Stanton

                  The Pi 2, depending on version, can be just as fast as a Pi 3 (older versions of the Pi 2 use the same processor chip). Otherwise it can be as capable.

                   

                  The Pi 2 does not have onboard WiFi though, you have to add that via USB or an interface on the GPIO pins.

                   

                  For GPS, that depends entirely on how your software wants to interface with it. Usually a GPS only gives information over a 'serial port'. That can either be via pins on your GPIO, or it can be via USB, so that's a decision to make.

                   

                  As for weather sensor, what do you want to sense? Temperature? Humidity? Pressure? How do you want to communicate with them? Do you want the Pi to handle communication with them? Depending on how you answer these questions, depends on what hardware you get. Some sensors are 'all in one' and contain at least two, pressure and temperature, humidity and temperature, but usually not all three.

                   

                  From my experience, find out how you want to display this information first, and then see what you can get that works with it - for example if you end up working with JavaScript you're going to find libraries for it for certain hardware to make your life easier, than if you choose Python which may have different libraries available.

                   

                  Needs a starting point, I'd say if you have a screen, start getting that working first and identify the parts you have to hand.

                    • Re: Complete noob needs help with Pi3 components for Pipboy
                      ibagadget

                      Thank you Christopher. I think I will stick with Python, as that is the software that the original Pipboy program is written in. As you say, I guess I should get the board and screen up and running first, then go from there. If I can get the basic program running, then I guess I can always tweak its functionality later on as I get peripherals sorted out.

                       

                      And if I can't, then at least I will have the basic setup working, and can finish off the rest of the gauntlet build without having to worry about space for extra features to squish in.

                • Re: Complete noob needs help with Pi3 components for Pipboy
                  ibagadget

                  Quick question. Building up my credit on Amazon thanks to retailer surveys, and came across the Freenove Starter Kits - Are these worth considering? The Ultimate Starter Kit looks like a pretty good deal at $49.95US and comes with quite a few accessories and tutorials (no Pi, but I already have that)

                    • Re: Complete noob needs help with Pi3 components for Pipboy
                      Christopher Stanton

                      They're as useful as your curiosity in them is.

                       

                      By that I mean they contain a lot of parts, and if you're the type that can go "oh I can think how these work together for a project!" then they're great, also if you're the type of person to go "I'll methodically go through each component and get it working, and build up a suite of code to then make a project" it's also fine. However, it's perfectly acceptable to look at it and go "I have all of this stuff, where do I start? how does it fit together?" and then be ultimately bemused - that's usually me.

                       

                      I tend to pick up parts as and when I need them for what I want to do, and make sure they're fit for the job, however having a collection of parts spare isn't a bad thing when you know they work and use them to test.

                       

                      Hopefully that gives you a bit of a steer depending on what approach you're coming from.

                    • Re: Complete noob needs help with Pi3 components for Pipboy
                      ibagadget

                      Well, I bit the bullet and ordered the 223pc starter project kit and a 37pc sensor kit from Amazon. Just have to track down a GPS chip that will work and get it ordered, then I should have everything I need to get started on this project.

                       

                      Then I just have to learn how to solder and code.

                       

                      Fortunately, the starter kit comes with a tutorial book and sample projects, so that should help me get learning.