5 Replies Latest reply on Jun 4, 2021 7:00 AM by Christopher Stanton

    ASP.Net Core 5 and Webserver on the BeagleBoard BBAI

    sjmill01

      For kicks, I wanted to see how well a BBAI could host a ASP.Net Core 5 Web site and run console apps.  So far, I'm very impressed.

       

      I made an Instructable on the process to do it:

       

      Build a Very Cheap .Net 5 Core Web Server With BeagleBone AI (BBAI) : 8 Steps - Instructables

       

      See ya',

      Sean

        • Re: .Net Core 5 and Webserver on the BeagleBoard BBAI
          mp2100

          Another thorough tutorial by Sean, this time over there at instructables. Ok: I’m only half way thru reading it but its good so far. I like my bbai but as you imply, it needs more support.

            • Re: .Net Core 5 and Webserver on the BeagleBoard BBAI
              sjmill01

              If you give it a try, let me know if you hit any stumbling blocks.  I'll be glad to help.

               

              Yesterday, I did the same basic procedure using an old Raspberry Pi and using Pagekite for TSL security.  I am very impressed with how these little machines can do such a great job with cutting edge tech.

               

              I also am very impressed how Microsoft just continues to give this tech away for free.

               

              For my first adventure with it, I'm building a page that brings my son and my projects posted across the web to one site:

               

              Raising Awesome (pagekite.me)

               

              See ya',

              Sean

              1 of 1 people found this helpful
            • Re: .Net Core 5 and Webserver on the BeagleBoard BBAI
              Fred27

              I've not tried that combination, but found .NET Core 1.0 ran fine on a Raspberry Pi - obviously a few years ago. I used that to demonstrate to some colleagues how to deploy containerized apps with Docker.

               

              By the way, Microsoft have now dropped "Core" from the name and it's just .NET 5.0.

                • Re: .Net Core 5 and Webserver on the BeagleBoard BBAI
                  sjmill01

                  Their naming is a bit of a mess.  For the web stuff, they are keeping “Core”.  Technically, I'm using ASP.Net Core 5 for my web page which is open source platform independent web apps.  But, to build those I use the .Net 5 binaries. (I updated my subject above with the asp prefix)

                   

                  “ASP.NET Core 5.0 is based on .NET 5.0 but retains the name "Core" to avoid confusing it with ASP.NET MVC 5. Likewise, Entity Framework Core 5.0 retains the name "Core" to avoid confusing it with Entity Framework 5 and 6.”

                   

                  https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/dotnet/core/dotnet-five

                   

                  With .Net 5, they’ve definitely made it confusing on what their recommended approach to web development is, what they call stuff, and how long past frameworks will be supported.  A camel is a horse by committee, I guess.  I was glad to see that they are still investing in VB, though.

                   

                  For those wanting to explore web development, I highlighted the dotnet template I prefer for website development.  Coding from the mid 90's CGI Forms for web pages, on to Classic ASP, and then to ASP.Net Web Forms, I find the webapp template the quickest and most reliable development approach for dynamic pages.  It, and the mvc template, are the most browser independent since it does not rely so much on the client side to render a page.  Because of this, pages made with it are often backwards compatible to Internet Explorer without any intention.  However, mvc, although it has many years in practice now, has extra bloat due to the controller concept.  The "webapp" template eliminates this and gets you back to just an HTML and a code file.  Still a little bloated compared to Web Forms of the .Net 4 era, but is much cleaner and easier to train others on than mvc.

                   

                  The other emerging technologies such as Blazor and Angular are good for user experiences intended to behave more like a connected, single page, app versus website - where you want the user experience to behave like an open websocket connection with no "postbacks".  For these, the GUI would typically stay the same and data changes before their eyes in near realtime.  This has its place, definitely and probably will be the norm in 10 years.  But for website development today, you limit your browser audience and the libraries are certainly a moving target with every release.

                   

                  See ya,

                  Sean